Bible Ministries International

Unsealed Teachings

The following studies examine the unsealed teachings that God had sealed up, until our day. Below you can learn about the different doctrines that we have learned since 1988.

Daniel 12:9 And he said, Go thy way, Daniel: for the words are closed up and sealed till the time of the end.

Select which series you would like to learn more about.

The Lamb Slain Series

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World


By

E. Gunther von Harringa

BIBLE MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL                                         

 The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 1

December 16, 2018


This is the second of a new video series on various new doctrines along with doctrinal “clarifications” to shed light on our previous understanding of them, which God has graciously revealed to His people over the course of the last 30 years. Today’s date is December 16, 2018, and our second topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be “Part 1.” Lord willing in this series, we want to examine what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


I have stated this from time to time, but it bears repeating: Do not trust what I say please! Check out the verses yourself, and see if they do indeed harmonize with all that the Bible teaches on this particular doctrine. The idea of Christ atoning for sins on the Cross has been deeply rooted and tenaciously upheld by well-meaning Christians for centuries right up until our present day, myself included. We also have to recognize that this is one of the “unsealed” teachings that God has opened up to His people, as exemplified by the following citations:


Daniel 12:4 and 9-10 declare: “But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, [even] to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased. ... {9} And he said, Go thy way, Daniel: for the words [are] closed up and sealed till the time of the end. {10} Many shall be purified, and made white, and tried; but the wicked shall do wickedly: and none of the wicked shall understand; but the wise shall understand.”


And Matthew 13:34-35 provides this instruction: “All these things spake Jesus unto the multitude in parables; and without a parable spake he not unto them: {35} That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying, I will open my mouth in parables; I will utter things which have been kept secret from the foundation of the world.


The Centrality Of The Cross


In any discussion of the Atonement, the focus will inevitably center on the Cross. Indeed our present Christmas season is a wonderful reminder to the entire world of the Incarnation of the Lord Jesus Christ. In fact, we discover verses which link Christ’s lowly birth in a manger with “truth” and “redemption,” as these next passages testify:


Isaiah 9:6 gloriously announces: “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.


John 18:37 records: “Pilate therefore said unto him, Art thou a king then? Jesus answered, Thou sayest that I am a king. To this end was I born, and for this cause came I into the world, that I should bear witness unto the truth. Every one that is of the truth heareth my voice.”


Likewise, 1 Timothy 1:15 acknowledges: “This [is] a faithful saying, and worthy of all acceptation, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners; of whom I am chief.”


Similarly, we also read in Matthew 1:20-23 concerning Christ’s “mission” as well as His deity; verse 23 quotes Isaiah 7:14, “But while he thought on these things, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost. {21} And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name JESUS: for he shall save his people from their sins. {22} Now all this was done, that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, {23} Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us.


And Luke 2:11 solemnly affirms: “For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord.”


However these same verses, when understood only at face value, do not give the full picture, which can only be grasped when one harmonizes all that the Bible declares regarding the nature, scope, and timing of the Atonement, which I am attempting to do in this series, with God’s help. In doing so, we will be investigating a number of important terms that surround the doctrine of the Atonement, in both the Old and New Testaments. Some of these include: “cross, “tree,” “hanged,” “cursed,” “blood,” “death,” “sin,” “trespass,” “reconciled,” “slain,” “body,” “flesh,” and “enmity,” etc. Today we will take a look at the first five of them. 


The “Cross” [stauros:G2716] Or “Tree”


There are many, many verses that speak of Christ making payment for sins, but surprisingly not too many that include the terms, “cross” or “tree,” which I would now like to address, as those who insist that Christ made payment for sin in 33 AD specifically point to such passages in order to prove their claims. Since there is no exact Hebrew word that is rendered “cross,” (as far as I could find) we will begin with the Greek: 


Colossians 2:13-14 maintain: “And you, being dead in your sins and the uncircumcision of your flesh, hath he quickened together with him, having forgiven you all trespasses; {14} Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross;” [stauros:G2716] 


Ephesians 2:16-17 acknowledge, “And that he might reconcile both unto God in one body by the cross [stauros:G2716], having slain the enmity thereby: {17} And came and preached peace to you which were afar off, and to them that were nigh.”


Philippians 2:8 likewise asserts: “And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.” [stauros:G2716] 


Colossians 1:20-22 similarly reveal: “Having  made peace through the blood [haima:G129] of his cross [stauros:G2716], by him to reconcile all things unto himself; by him, [I say], whether [they be] things in earth, or things in heaven. {21} And you, that were sometime alienated and enemies in [your] mind by wicked works, yet now hath he reconciled {22} In the body of his flesh through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight:”


The “Tree”


Let’s now examine some illustrations of how God utilizes the Hebrew, then the Greek words for “tree”:

Deuteronomy 21:22-23 is an extremely important passage to consider, and the two terms, “for he that is hanged” and “[is] accursed of God” are only found together in verse 23:  “And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death, and he be to be put to death, and thou hang [talah:H8518]  him on a tree [`ets:H6086]: {23} His body shall not remain all night upon the tree [`ets:H6086], but thou shalt in any wise bury him that day; (for he that is hanged [talah:H8518] [is] accursed of God [qelalah:H7045];) that thy land be not defiled, which the LORD thy God giveth thee [for] an inheritance.”


The following references also contain the same word for “tree,” which is translated as “wood” with regards to the construction of Noah’s Ark, and the sacrifice of Isaac:


Genesis 6:14 records one of God’s precise instructions to Noah: “Make thee an ark of gopher wood; [`ets:H6086] rooms shalt thou make in the ark, and shalt pitch [kaphar:H3722 - a verb] it within and without with pitch.” [kopher:H3724 - a noun - derived from H3722]


Please note the identically spelled words rendered, “and shall pitch,” (the verb form) and “with pitch” (the noun form which stems from the verb form), that is most commonly translated as “atonement” (H3722) or “ransom.” (H3724)


In Genesis 22:3, 6-7, and 9 this word is prominently featured 5 times in this account which takes place on (one of the mountains of) Mount Moriah - the exact location where David set up an altar in the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite, and where the foundation of the Temple was laid, and where Christ hung on a wooden cross, outside the city walls in Jerusalem in 33 AD: 


“And Abraham rose up early in the morning, and saddled his ass, and took two of his young men with him, and Isaac his son, and clave the wood [`ets:H6086] for the burnt offering, and rose up, and went unto the place of which God had told him. ... {6} And Abraham took the wood [`ets:H6086] of the burnt offering, and laid [it] upon Isaac his son; and he took the fire in his hand, and a knife; and they went both of them together. {7} And Isaac spake unto Abraham his father, and said, My father: and he said, Here [am] I, my son. And he said, Behold the fire and the wood: [`ets:H6086] but where [is] the lamb for a burnt offering? ... {9} And they came to the place which God had told him of; and Abraham built an altar there, and laid the wood [`ets:H6086] in order, and bound [`aqad:H6123 - only found here in the Old Testament and has no root word] Isaac his son, and laid him on the altar upon the wood. [`ets:H6086]”


“Tree” [xylon:G3586]


The subsequent New Testament citations incorporate the Greek word, “xylon” (G3586) or “tree”:


1 Peter 2:24 declares: “Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree [xylon:G3586], that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.”


Acts 5:30 announces: “The God of our fathers raised up Jesus, whom ye slew and hanged [kremannymi:G2910] on a tree. [xylon:G3586]


Similarly, Acts 10:39 records: “And we are witnesses of all things which he did both in the land of the Jews, and in Jerusalem; whom they slew and hanged [kremannymi:G2910] on a tree:” [xylon:G3586]


Restating what Deuteronomy 21:23 teaches, Galatians 3:13 acknowledges: “Christ hath redeemed us from the curse [katara:G2671] of the law, being made a curse  [katara:G2671]  for us: for it is written, Cursed [epikataratos:G1944] [is] every one that hangeth [kremannymi:G2910] on a tree:” [xylon:G3586]


This verse is highly significant because of its relationship to Deuteronomy 21:23, and also because the same term for “curse” or “cursed” appears three times. 


Perhaps you also took note of the term, “hanged” in the foregoing verses I just quoted. It is also found in another outstanding passage - verse 40 - of Matthew 22:36-40,


“Master, which [is] the great commandment in the law? {37}  Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. {38} This is the first and great commandment. {39} And the second [is] like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. {40} On these two commandments hang [kremannymi:G2910] all the law and the prophets.


And speaking of the “law and the prophets” (or as it is sometimes expressed as, “law, prophets, and psalms” found in Luke 24:44) - both of which represent the Old Testament, and thus point to the Lord Jesus as the “Word of God;” I’ll read Luke 24:27, and 44-48,


“And beginning at Moses and all the prophets, he expounded unto them in all the scriptures the things concerning himself. ... {44} And he said unto them, These [are] the words which I spake unto you, while I was yet with you, that all things must be fulfilled, which were written in the law of Moses, and [in] the prophets, and [in] the psalms, concerning me. {45} Then opened he their understanding, that they might understand the scriptures, {46} And said unto them, Thus it is written, and thus it behoved Christ to suffer, and to rise from the dead the third day: {47} And that repentance and remission of sins should be preached in his name among all nations, beginning at Jerusalem. {48} And ye are witnesses of these things.”


I have stressed numerous times the message of Luke 24:45, that God has to open the understanding of His elect to even the most basic of spiritual truths, as we read in Luke 18:31-34, which is especially relevant to this study, as we are investigating the very doctrine which the Lord is referring to in this Scripture, namely His death, burial, and resurrection; please note the three different verbs that God has inserted in this amazing verse - “understood” [syniemi:G4920] (none); “hid,” [krypto:G2928] and (neither) “knew they” [ginosko:G1097]:


“Then he took [unto him] the twelve, and said unto them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished. {32} For he shall be delivered unto the Gentiles, and shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on: {33} And they shall scourge [him], and put him to death: and the third day he shall rise again. {34} And they understood [syniemi:G4920] none of these things: and this saying was hid  [krypto:G2928] from them, neither knew they [ginosko:G1097] the things which were spoken.”


“Blood” [dam:H1818]


The next word “blood,” surfaces extensively in both the Old and New Testaments in connection with “atonement,” as the following passages illustrate:


Leviticus 17:11 and 14 highlight the close relationship between the terms “blood” and “atonement” as well as “life” and “soul,” (which in this instance are the identical Hebrew word):  “For the life [nephesh:H5315] of the flesh [basar:H1320] [is] in the blood [dam:H1818]: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement [kaphar:H3722 - verb form] for your souls [nephesh:H5315]: for it [is] the blood [dam:H1818]: [that] maketh an atonement [kaphar:H3722 - verb form] for the soul. [nephesh:H5315]  ... {14} For [it is] the life [nephesh:H5315] of all flesh [basar:H1320]; the blood [dam:H1818]:of it [is] for the life [nephesh:H5315] thereof: therefore I said unto the children of Israel, Ye shall eat the blood [dam:H1818]: of no manner of flesh [basar:H1320]: for the life [nephesh:H5315] of all flesh [is] the blood [dam:H1818] thereof: whosoever eateth it shall be cut off.”


Also, I would like to draw your attention to the word, “flesh,” (basar:H1320) which is found three times; “life” or “soul” (nephesh:H5315) surfaces 5 times; and the verb form of “atonement,” (kaphar:H3722) (which we noted earlier) twice. 


Verses 11 and 15 of Isaiah 1:11-15 also include the same word, “blood” in the context of external ceremonial sacrifices, which were merely given perfunctorily, and which God detests: “To what purpose [is] the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the LORD: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts; and I delight not in the blood [dam:H1818] of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats. {12} When ye come to appear before me, who hath required this at your hand, to tread my courts? {13} Bring no more vain oblations; incense is an abomination unto me; the new moons and sabbaths, the calling of assemblies, I cannot away with; [it is] iniquity, even the solemn meeting. {14} Your new moons and your appointed feasts my soul hateth: they are a trouble unto me; I am weary to bear [them]. {15} And when ye spread forth your hands, I will hide mine eyes from you: yea, when ye make many prayers, I will not hear: your hands are full of blood.” [dam:H1818]


On the other hand in Isaiah 63:3, we see the singular sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ for His elect, in His perfect atonement, as well as His retribution against all the non-elect: “I have trodden the winepress alone; and of the people [there was] none with me: for I will tread them in mine anger, and trample them in my fury; and their blood [netsach:H5332 - different word, signifying “strength” or “forever”] shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment.”


“Blood” [haima:G129]


In the New Testament, the chief word for “blood” is “haima” (G129), from which we derive our English words that begin with the prefix, “hema-” or “hemo-” having to do with blood.


Matthew 26:28 (along with its counterparts, Mark 14:24 and Luke 22:20) maintains: “For this is my blood [haima:G129] of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins.”


Acts 20:28 speaks of salvation as a “purchase”: “Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to all the flock, over the which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers, to feed the church of God, which he hath purchased with his own blood.” [haima:G129] 


Romans 3:25 connects the word, “propitiation” (or “atonement”) with “blood”:  “Whom God hath set forth [to be] a propitiation [hilasterion:G2435] through faith in his blood [haima:G129], to declare his righteousness for the remission of sins that are past, through the forbearance of God;”


In Romans 5:9 “being justified” is also linked with “blood”:Much more then, being [dikaioo:G1344] now justified [dikaioo:G1344]  by his blood [haima:G129], we shall be saved from wrath through him.”


Likewise in Ephesians 1:7, God associates “redemption” with “blood” and “forgiveness of sins” with “grace”: In whom we have redemption [apolytrosis:G629] through his blood [haima:G129], the forgiveness [aphesis:G859] of sins [paraptoma:G3900], according to the riches of his grace;[charis:G5485]


Hebrews 9:7, 12-14, 22 and 25 also join “blood” with “redemption” and “remission” (or “forgiveness”): “But into the second [went] the high priest alone once every year, not without blood [haima:G129], which he offered for himself, and [for] the errors of the people: ... {12} Neither by the blood [haima:G129]of goats and calves, but by his own blood [haima:G129] he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption [lytrosis:G3085] [for us]. {13} For if the blood [haima:G129] of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: {14} How much more shall the blood [haima:G129] of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? ... {22} And almost all things are by the law purged with blood [haima:G129]; and without shedding of blood [haimatekchysia:G130] is no remission [aphesis:G859]. ... {25} Nor yet that he should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood [haima:G129] of others;”


Hebrews 13:12, “Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood [haima:G129], suffered without the gate.”


You can see from these references how significant this word “blood” is, and its vital connection to “atonement;” it is for this reason that the proponents of  a 33 AD atonement place particular emphasis on the physical blood that was shed on the Cross.


I think we will have to stop here today, and Lord willing continue our study of this doctrine in our next study. 

 The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 2

January 13, 2018


Today’s date is January 13, 2018, and our second topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 2. Lord willing in this series, we want to examine what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


An Important Reminder


I mentioned something in Part 1, which bears repeating. I have stressed numerous times the message of Luke 24:45, that God has to open the understanding of His elect to even the most basic of spiritual truths, as we read in Luke 18:31-34, which is especially relevant to this study, as we are investigating the very doctrine which the Lord is referring to in this Scripture, namely His death, burial, and resurrection; please note the three different verbs that God has inserted in this amazing verse - “understood” [syniemi:G4920] (none); “hid,” [krypto:G2928] and (neither) “knew they” [ginosko:G1097]:


“Then he took [unto him] the twelve, and said unto them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished. {32} For he shall be delivered unto the Gentiles, and shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on: {33} And they shall scourge [him], and put him to death: and the third day he shall rise again. {34} And they understood [syniemi:G4920] none of these things: and this saying was hid  [krypto:G2928] from them, neither knew they [ginosko:G1097] the things which were spoken.”


The doctrine of the Atonement has been kept “sealed” or “shut up” by God Himself, until our present day, now that we are in the “time of the end” spoken about in Daniel 12:4 and 9, which is why we are investigating this particular teaching, as well as a number of others, which God has graciously revealed to His elect over the course of the last 30 years or so.


Daniel 12:4 and 9-10 declare: “But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, [even] to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased. ... {9} And he said, Go thy way, Daniel: for the words [are] closed up and sealed till the time of the end. {10} Many shall be purified, and made white, and tried; but the wicked shall do wickedly: and none of the wicked shall understand; but the wise shall understand.”


Luke 10:21 includes the same idea of “hiding” and revealing” truth, in which the word, “babes,” is a reference to the elect: 


“In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid [apokrypto:G613] these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed [apokalypto:G601] them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.”


I would like to draw your attention to two highly important terms in this verse which tie into today’s lesson, namely “thou hast hid,” and “hast revealed.” So let’s take a closer look at each of these words:


Thou Hast Hid [apokrypto:G613] 


This compound Greek word is comprised of “apo” (G575), rendered as “from” primarily and “krypto” (G2928), which is the identical word translated “hid” in Luke 18:34. Besides the parallel verse in Matthew 11:25, this expression surfaces in four other Scriptures:


In Matthew 25:18 one discovers that it is used in conjunction with the “wicked and slothful servant” - a picture of the non-elect, who might appear to be saved but are not, and the subsequent punishment they receive, according to verses 28-30: “But he that had received one went and digged in the earth, and hid [apokrypto:G613] his lord's money… {28} Take therefore the talent from him, and give [it] unto him which hath ten talents. {29} For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even that which he hath. {30} And cast ye the unprofitable servant into outer darkness: there shall be weeping and gnashing of teeth.


Please note the crucial principle that God lays down in verse 29, which we can understand spiritually with regards to doctrines which God has revealed since the “book” (the Bible) was “unsealed” in Revelation 5:1-5 at the beginning of the Great Tribulation on May 21, 1988. This principle has to do with “Truth that one possesses, and more is given to him,” as opposed to another person that perhaps understood and agreed with many of these “unsealed” doctrines, let’s say, prior to May 21, 2011, but afterwards they began to reject them, one by one, demonstrating that “whatever they had previously understood is taken away from them, so they are left with nothing.”


In 1 Corinthians 2:4-7 this word “hidden” is spoken of as “a mystery,” and notice the contrast that is being made between “man’s wisdom” and the “wisdom of God,” as well as “the natural man” versus “he that is spiritual,” leading up to the exceptional methodology for studying the Bible that God exclusively ordained in verses 10-14,  “And my speech and my preaching [was] not with enticing words of man's wisdom, but in demonstration of the Spirit and of power: {5} That your faith should not stand in the wisdom of men, but in the power of God. {6} Howbeit we speak wisdom among them that are perfect: yet not the wisdom of this world, nor of the princes of this world, that come to nought:{7} But we speak the wisdom of God in a mystery, [even] the hidden [apokrypto:G613] [wisdom], which God ordained before the world unto our glory:... {10} But God hath revealed [apokalypto:G601] [them] unto us by his Spirit: for the Spirit searcheth all things, yea, the deep things of God. {11} For what man knoweth the things of a man, save the spirit of man which is in him? even so the things of God knoweth no man, but the Spirit of God. {12} Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God. {13} Which things also we speak, not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual. {14} But the natural man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know [them], because they are spiritually discerned.


Please also note the word, “hath revealed” (apokalypto:G601) in 1 Corinthians 2:10, which is the identical term as in Luke 10:21, which we will be considering shortly.  


Verse 9 of Ephesians  3:8-11 is the next verse we want to consider:  “Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ; {9} And to make all [men] see what [is] the fellowship of the mystery, which from the beginning of the world hath been hid [apokrypto:G613] in God, who created all things by Jesus Christ: {10} To the intent that now unto the principalities and powers in heavenly [places] might be known by the church the manifold wisdom of God, {11} According to the eternal purpose which he purposed in Christ Jesus our Lord:”


Colossians 1:26-28 likewise affirms: “[Even] the mystery which hath been hid [apokrypto:G613] from ages and from generations, but now is made manifest to his saints: {27} To whom God would make known what [is] the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles; which is Christ in you, the hope of glory: {28} Whom we preach, warning every man, and teaching every man in all wisdom; that we may present every man perfect in Christ Jesus:”


Did you happen to note the “time reference” in these last three passages with regard to “hiding” truth?  1 Corinthians 2:7 mentions “before the world.”  Ephesians 3:9 also explains that this “mystery” has been hidden “...from the beginning of the world.”  And Colossians 1:26 uses the language “from ages and from generations.” We also want to be mindful of the admonition in Proverbs 25:2, 


“[It is] the glory of God to conceal [cathar:H5641] a thing [dabar:H1697]: but the honour of kings [is] to search out [chaqar:H2713] a matter.” [dabar:H1697]


This citation is extremely important, as it underscores the responsibility of each of God’s elect [i.e., “kings”] to follow God’s methodology of “comparing spiritual with spiritual,” as outlined in 1 Corinthians 2:13 as well as in Acts 17:11.


Hath Revealed [apokalypto:G601]


The other expression that we want to search out in Luke 10:21 is “hath revealed” (apokalypto:G601). It surfaces 26 times in the New Testament, and always as some form of “reveal,” as Matthew 16:17 further emphasizes:


“And Jesus answered and said unto him, Blessed art thou, Simon Barjona: for flesh and blood hath [apokalypto:G601][G0] not revealed [apokalypto:G601] [it] unto thee, but my Father which is in heaven.”


A Closer Look At 1 Peter 2:24


In Part 1, we considered the word, “tree,” in 1 Peter 2:24, but I would like to spend some extra time on this verse, as it is one of the favorite passages that adherents of the Atonement in 33 AD bring up quite often:


“Who his own self [autos:G846] bare [anaphero:G399] our sins [hamartia:G266] in [en:G1722] his own [autos:G846] body [soma:G4983] on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by [hos:G3739] whose [autos:G846] stripes [molops:G3468] ye were healed.” [iaomai:G2390]


The last two terms in this verse, “stripes” and “healed” most definitely speak about payment for sin, and would seem to support the conclusion that this passage is referring to Christ on the “cross” (stauros:G2716) or “tree” (xylon:G3586) in 33 AD. However, we must also keep in mind that God wanted to keep this information “under wraps” until our day as I have frequently indicated, so He crafted many verses in such a way that they can be easily misunderstood. Secondly, let’s recall that one who is hanged on a “tree” or “cross” (both made out of wood) has to do with being “cursed,” as Deuteronomy 21:22-23 and Galatians 3:13 (in which this term is repeated three times) emphasize so clearly:


“And if a man have committed a sin worthy of death, and he be to be put to death, and thou hang [talah:H8518]  him on a tree [`ets:H6086]: {23} His body shall not remain all night upon the tree [`ets:H6086], but thou shalt in any wise bury him that day; (for he that is hanged [talah:H8518] [is] accursed of God [qelalah:H7045];) that thy land be not defiled, which the LORD thy God giveth thee [for] an inheritance.”


“Christ hath redeemed us from the curse [katara:G2671] of the law, being made a curse  [katara:G2671]  for us: for it is written, Cursed [epikataratos:G1944] [is] every one that hangeth [kremannymi:G2910] on a tree:” [xylon:G3586]

The word, “that hangeth” in Galatians 3:13 is curiously found in another outstanding passage - verse 40 - of Matthew 22:36-40, which I noted in Part 1, but is certainly worth repeating, as that study was aired almost a month ago:


“Master, which [is] the great commandment in the law? {37}  Jesus said unto him, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind. {38} This is the first and great commandment. {39} And the second [is] like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. {40} On these two commandments hang [kremannymi:G2910] all the law and the prophets.


There is at least a twofold significance here: One, we understand that Christ is the very essence of the “Law and the Prophets,” (or the Old Testament), in addition to being the grand theme of the New Testament as well, as we learn from John 5:39, for instance:


“Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me.”


Secondly, He alone perfectly obeyed both the first and second greatest commandments (on behalf of each of the elect), which are a distillation of the entire Bible, as Ecclesiastes 12:13 underscores: 


“Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this [is] the whole [duty] of man.”


(Bare [anaphero:G399] Our Sins [hamartia:G266]


The main issue with respect to the Atonement centers around the all important question as to when and where  Christ paid for the sins of each of God's elect? So, with that in mind, let's consider the two terms, “bear” (anaphero:G399) and “our sins” (hamartia:G266) in 1 Peter 2:24. These two words crop up in two other highly  significant passages, namely, Hebrews 7:27 and 9:26-28, in which they are rendered as, “offer(-ed) up” and “sins,”  as well as “bear”  and “sins” respectively, that deal with this very subject:


Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up [anaphero:G399] sacrifice, first for his own sins  [hamartia:G266] and then for the people's: for this he did once [hapax:G530] when he offered up [anaphero:G399] himself.”


“For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. {27}And as it is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the judgment: {28} So Christ was once [hapax:G530] offered to bear [anaphero:G399] the sins [hamartia:G266] of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.”


In these two Scriptures, there is  a little word that is most enlightening  - the term “once.”  If Christ was once “offered up” or “to bear” sins, when did that occur? This is an exceedingly crucial question.  Was it “...from the foundation of the world” or in 33 AD? It helps to approach this question as one would the matter of baptism. Both water baptism and Spirit baptism are taught in the Bible. Which one do you think has the capacity to forgive sins, and infuse eternal life into the  lives of the elect during the day of salvation? Obviously, only Spirit baptism could accomplish that.


The next two words that warrant our attention in 1 Peter 2:24 are: “stripes,” and “ye were healed,” which are only found together in this verse, so we will have to study them individually.


Stripes [molops:G3468] 


As a matter of fact, “stripes,” only surfaces here, and it's root word is dubious, which makes it somewhat challenging to investigate. In such cases, it is helpful to look for the same English word in either Greek or Hebrew. We are helped greatly by one verse in particular  - Isaiah 53:5 -  which 1 Peter 2:24 is quoting in part, forming what is known as a “word bridge,” between the Greek and the Hebrew:


Isaiah 53:5, “But he [was] wounded for our transgressions, [he was] bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace [was] upon him; and with his stripes  [chabbuwrah:H2250] we are healed.”


This Hebrew word, “and with his stripes” is rendered as “and bruises” in Isaiah 1:6, and represents the sins of the elect which Christ paid for; this was discussed in some detail in the previous video series that BMI presented on “Annihilation Or Eternal Suffering”:


Isaiah 1:6 maintains: “From the sole of the foot even unto the head [there is] no soundness in it; [but] wounds, and bruises [chabbuwrah:H2250], and putrifying sores: they have not been closed, neither bound up, neither mollified with ointment.”


Ye Were Healed [iaomai:G2390]


The expression, “ye were healed” is of course a reference to spiritual healing, or salvation, and is expressed in Acts 28:27 (and its parallel passages, Matthew 13:15 and John 12:40); it is quoting Isaiah 6:9-10, a most important verse that highlights the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation: 


“For the heart of this people is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes have they closed; lest they should see with [their] eyes, and hear with [their] ears, and understand with [their] heart, and should be converted, and I should heal [iaomai:G2390] them.”


Once again, we recognize that these two words, “stripes” and “ye were healed,” have to do with salvation. That is not the issue. The overarching question that we are seeking to answer is WHEN did this occur? Was it in 33 AD or prior to Creation? This is the gist of what this video series is concerned with.


Body [soma:G4983]


The next word that we want to discuss is “body” in 1 Peter 2:24, which those who insist on the Atonement occuring in 33 AD bring up frequently by posing a question like this: “If Christ made Atonement “from the foundation of the world,” and not in 33 AD, what kind of a body did He have, and on what “tree” or “cross” was there, since Creation had not taken place yet”? The second question has already been answered by Deuteronomy 21:22-23 and Galatians 3:13, and that is that the One who is hanged on a “tree” or “cross” has become a curse. This is what is in view spiritually - to be cursed by God Almighty, and, as a result, to be under His wrath, which we will continue to address, as we proceed in this series. With that in mind, let’s return to the first question, and consider how God utilizes this term, “body” (soma:G4983) in the New Testament, as the following citations address:


Luke 22:19 records, “And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake [it], and gave unto them, saying, This is my body [soma:G4983] which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.”


And John 2:21 acknowledges: “But he spake of the temple of his body.” [soma:G4983]


Ephesians 5:30 also teaches: “For we are members of his body, [soma:G4983] of his flesh, and of his bones.”


I’m afraid that we’ve run out of time, so we will have to stop here, and pick this up next week, Lord willing.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 3

January 20, 2019


Today’s date is January 20, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 3. In this series, we are examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


The privilege of studying God’s Word is indeed an amazing privilege, as God’s Word is likened to a beautifully woven, exquisitely detailed tapestry like no other - similar to the priests’ garments or other colorful fabrics in the Tabernacle and later in the Temple - that all have tremendous spiritual significance because they point exclusively to the Lord Jesus Christ, “...the Author and Finisher of [our] faith….” according to Hebrews 12:2. In this unparalleled  tapestry, one can see the “big picture,” or focus upon a single thread, and in both cases find tremendous spiritual sustenance. Yet, for all this awesome, breathtaking beauty and harmony that the Scriptures afford, we must remember that God’s Word is intended to be obeyed, which as we have correctly understood, is the definition of genuine love, as John 14:15 exhorts,


“If ye love me, keep my commandments.”


Last week as we were discussing 1 Peter 2:24, and the term, “body” we ran out of time, so I’m going to review some of that material before proceeding. I’ll read 1 Peter 2:24 again, 


“Who his own self bare our sins in his own body [soma:G4983] on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.”


Body [soma:G4983]


I made the point that those who insist on the Atonement occuring in 33 AD frequently bring up a question like this: “If Christ made Atonement “from the foundation of the world,” and not in 33 AD, what kind of a body did He have, and what “tree” or “cross” was there, since Creation had not taken place yet”? Part of the question has already been answered by Deuteronomy 21:22-23 and Galatians 3:13, by understanding that the One who is hanged on a “tree” or “cross” had become a curse. This is what is in view spiritually - to be cursed by God Almighty, and, as a result, to be under His wrath, which we will continue to address, as we progress in this series. With that in mind, let’s consider the first part of the question, and see how God utilizes this term, “body” (soma:G4983) in the New Testament, as the following citations address:


Luke 22:19 records, “And he took bread, and gave thanks, and brake [it], and gave unto them, saying, This is my body [soma:G4983] which is given for you: this do in remembrance of me.”


And John 2:21 acknowledges: “But he spake of the temple of his body.” [soma:G4983]


Ephesians 5:30 also teaches: “For we are members of his body, [soma:G4983] of his flesh, and of his bones.”


In these verses Jesus’ body is likened to both physical “bread” and a physical “Temple,” but we know that these are metaphors, expressing a spiritual reality. Jesus’ body does not literally consist of flour, yeast, salt, and water, neither is it a literal Temple made up of timber and stone or other materials, nor are the elect of God literal bones composed of collages, calcium, and bone marrow. These are all physical in nature, and are used by God to illustrate a deeper spiritual truth. What I’m attempting to show is simply how God has written the Bible parabolically, and because the Bible is a spiritual book, the diligent student of the Scriptures has to seek for the spiritual significance first, as we read in 1 Corinthians 15:44, in which this word, “body” is repeated 4 times, and the terms, “a natural” and “a spiritual,” twice; both words only surface together here, so we will have to research them separately. We also want to bear in mind that what is being carefully presented in 1 Corinthians 15 is an argument for the resurrection of the dead concerning the Lord Jesus, and in turn, His elect people as well: 


“It is sown a natural [psychikos:G5591] body; [soma:G4983] it is raised a spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] body. [soma:G4983]There is a natural [psychikos:G5591] body, [soma:G4983] and there is a spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] body.” [soma:G4983]


A Natural [psychikos:G5591] Body


The Greek term for “natural” is “psychikos,” which stems from “psyche” (G5590) rendered primarily as “soul” or “life,” which is derived from “psycho” (G5594), which is only used once as “wax cold” - referring to the love of many in Matthew 24:12. A good example of this is the formation of Adam out of the dust of the earth, and then God breathed into him, the “breath of life,” as we read in Genesis 2:7, which is also re-stated in 1 Corinthians 15:45, as we will learn shortly: 


“And the LORD God formed man [of] the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.”  


The following four passages contain this term, “natural,” besides 1 Corinthians 15:44, but since one of these is 1 Corinthians 15:46, I’ll read from verses 35-50 since the context is dealing with various kinds of “bodies,” and our word, “soma” (G4983)  is found no less than 9 times:


“But some [man] will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body [soma:G4983] do they come? {36} [Thou] fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened [or “made alive”], except it die: {37} And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body [soma:G4983] that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other [grain]: {38} But God giveth it a body [soma:G4983] as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. [soma:G4983]  {39} All flesh [is] not the same flesh: but [there is] one [kind of] flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, [and] another of birds. {40} [There are] also celestial bodies, and bodies [soma:G4983]  terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial [is] one, and the [glory] of the terrestrial [is] another. {41} [There is] one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for [one] star differeth from [another] star in glory. {42} So also [is] the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: {43} It is sown in dishonour; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power: {44} It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual body. [soma:G4983] There is a natural body, [soma:G4983] and there is a spiritual body. [soma:G4983]  {45} And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam [was made] a quickening spirit. {46} Howbeit that [was] not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural [psychikos:G5591]; and afterward that which is spiritual. {47} The first man [is] of the earth, earthy: the second man [is] the Lord from heaven. {48} As [is] the earthy, such [are] they also that are earthy: and as [is] the heavenly, such [are] they also that are heavenly. {49} And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly. {50} Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption.”


In the context of explaining God’s methodology for studying the Bible, 1 Corinthians 2:14 uses the word, “natural” regarding those who have not been “born from above”:“But the natural [psychikos:G5591] man receiveth not the things of the Spirit of God: for they are foolishness unto him: neither can he know [them], because they are spiritually discerned.”


In a chapter that is focused on the “tongue,” verse 15 of James 3:14-16 contains this term, rendered as “sensual”: “But if ye have bitter envying and strife in your hearts, glory not, and lie not against the truth. {15} This wisdom descendeth not from above, but [is] earthly, sensual, [psychikos:G5591] devilish. {16} For where envying and strife [is], there [is] confusion and every evil work.”


Verse 19 of Jude 1:17-19 likewise translates this word as “sensual”: “But, beloved, remember ye the words which were spoken before of the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ; {18} How that they told you there should be mockers in the last time, who should walk after their own ungodly lusts. {19} These be they who separate themselves, sensual, [psychikos:G5591] having not the Spirit.”



A Spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] Body


Now we can turn our attention to the word, “spiritual” (pneumatikos:G4152), found in 1 Corinthians 15:44 and 46. It stems from the word, “pneuma” (G4151) or “Spirit,” which in turn, is derived from “pneo” (G4154), or “blow.” You might recall John 3:8, where “pneo” is translated as “bloweth” and in which “pneuma” is rendered as both “The wind” and also “Spirit”: 


The wind [pneuma:G4151] bloweth [pneo:G4154] where it listeth, and thou hearest the sound thereof, but canst not tell whence it cometh, and whither it goeth: so is every one that is born of the Spirit.” [pneuma:G4151] 


1 Corinthians 15:44 and 46 teaches: “It is sown a natural body; it is raised a spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] body. There is a natural body, and there is a spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] body. ... {46} Howbeit that [was] not first which is spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152], but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. [pneumatikos:G4152]


Here are some other examples of how God utilizes this term:


It is expressed twice in 1 Corinthians 2:13, as “spiritual things” and “with spiritual”:“Which things also we speak, not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things [pneumatikos:G4152] with spiritual.” [pneumatikos:G4152]


1 Corinthians 10:3-4 we also read: “And did all eat the same spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] meat; {4} And did all drink the same spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] drink: for they drank of that spiritual [pneumatikos:G4152] Rock [petra:G4073] that followed them: and that Rock [petra:G4073] was Christ.”


Once again these Scriptures are using physical objects - “meat,” “drink” and “Rock” - to exemplify spiritual Truth. Christ is obviously not a rock in the literal sense, but is likened to one as something that is immovable and stable. 


In fact in 1 Peter 2:4-8, both Christ and His people are pictured as “living stones;” additionally Christ is featured as a “rock” (petra:G4037), as in 1 Corinthians 10:4:To whom coming, [as unto] a living [zao:G2198] stone, [lithos:G3037] disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, [and] precious, {5} Ye also, as lively [zao:G2198]  stones, [lithos:G3037] are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. {6} Wherefore also it is contained in the scripture, Behold, I lay in Sion a chief corner stone, [lithos:G3037] elect, precious: and he that believeth on him shall not be confounded. {7} Unto you therefore which believe [he is] precious: but unto them which be disobedient, the stone [lithos:G3037] which the builders disallowed, the same is made the head of the corner, {8} And a stone [lithos:G3037] of stumbling, and a rock [petra:G4073] of offence, [even to them] which stumble at the word, being disobedient: whereunto also they were appointed.”

Again we note that neither Christ nor those within His Kingdom are literal stones, but rather are compared to them metaphorically. The same is the case with these next references that are “word pictures” providing further spiritual insight:


Daniel 10:5-6 reveals, “Then I lifted up mine eyes, and looked, and behold a certain man clothed in linen, whose loins [were] girded with fine gold of Uphaz: {6} His body also [was] like the beryl, and his face as the appearance of lightning, and his eyes as lamps of fire, and his arms and his feet like in colour to polished brass, and the voice of his words like the voice of a multitude.”


Likewise, Revelation 1:13-17 offers this magnificent description: “And in the midst of the seven candlesticks [one] like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment down to the foot, and girt about the paps with a golden girdle. {14}  His head and [his] hairs [were] white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes [were] as a flame of fire; {15} And his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace; and his voice as the sound of many waters. {16} And he had in his right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp twoedged sword: and his countenance [was] as the sun shineth in his strength. {17} And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last:”


John 1:15 and 30 acknowledge this as well: “John bare witness of him, and cried, saying, This was he of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred [ginomai:G1096] [hardly ever used as “preferred” - predominantly as “to be” or “existed”] before me: for he was before me. ... {30} This is he of whom I said, After me cometh a man which is preferred [ginomai:G1096]  before me: for he was before me.”


This statement that John makes is highly significant, and it will aid us in answering the question as far as what kind of a body did Christ have at the “...foundation of the world,” prior to His incarnation in 7 BC. But I think I’ll wait to develop this. I also want to go back to 1 Corinthians 15:20-23 and delve further into these verses in our next lesson, Lord permitting:


1 Corinthians 15:20 and 23, “But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits [aparche:G536] of them that slept. ... {23} But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; [aparche:G536] afterward they that are Christ's at his coming.”

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 4

January 27, 2019


Today’s date is January 27, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 4. In this series, we are examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


What Kind Of A Body Did Christ Have At The Foundation Of The World In Order To Pay For Sins?


We are attempting to provide a Biblical response to the question that those who insist that the Atonement took place in 33 AD pose: “What kind of a body did Christ have at the foundation of the world in order to pay for sins?” To do so, we have been investigating the Greek word for “body” (soma:G4983) in Parts 2-3. In Part 3 we spent some time looking at various “bodies” - physical as well as spiritual - in 1 Corinthians 15, and the differing levels of “glory” that each possess. It might behoove us to review that chapter again from verses 35-50, keeping in mind that this term, “body” appears 9 times in these verses:


“But some [man] will say, How are the dead raised up? and with what body [soma:G4983] do they come? {36} [Thou] fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened [or “made alive”], except it die: {37} And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body [soma:G4983] that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat, or of some other [grain]: {38} But God giveth it a body [soma:G4983]  as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body. [soma:G4983]  {39} All flesh [is] not the same flesh: but [there is] one [kind of] flesh of men, another flesh of beasts, another of fishes, [and] another of birds. {40} [There are] also celestial bodies, and bodies [soma:G4983]  terrestrial: but the glory of the celestial [is] one, and the [glory] of the terrestrial [is] another. {41} [There is] one glory of the sun, and another glory of the moon, and another glory of the stars: for [one] star differeth from [another] star in glory. {42} So also [is] the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: {43} It is sown in dishonour; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in power: {44} It is sown a natural body [soma:G4983]; it is raised a spiritual body. [soma:G4983] There is a natural body, [soma:G4983] and there is a spiritual body. [soma:G4983] {45} And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam [was made] a quickening spirit. {46} Howbeit that [was] not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. {47} The first man [is] of the earth, earthy: the second man [is] the Lord from heaven. {48} As [is] the earthy, such [are] they also that are earthy: and as [is] the heavenly, such [are] they also that are heavenly. {49} And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly. {50} Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption.”


Body [soma:G4983]


As we continue to search out this word, “body” (soma:G4983), we want to be very clear that we are not referring to the “body” or “Bride” of Christ, which spiritually is made up of all God’s elect; nor are we concerned with the resurrection of the saints’ bodies at the end of this prolonged day of judgment that this chapter deals with. Our focus, rather, is on the “body” which Christ Himself possessed at the “...foundation of the world,” in which He died, was annihilated for the sins of each of His chosen people, and then rose victoriously. We need this kind of specificity in order to answer the question at hand. However, we have to be extremely careful, as we are speaking of eternal God, His royal majesty, the Lord Jesus Christ, and there is great mystery involved, whenever we begin to discuss any aspect of the Godhead directly. There are a number of ways that we can approach this issue; here are three of them:


  1. We can look at the kind of body that Christ had after His divine conception, and throughout His approximately 38 ½ years on earth, as He demonstrated on earth what had taken place prior to Creation in the Atonement.
  2. We can consider various appearances of Christ on earth prior to His incarnation - known, theologically, as “theophanies” - which possibly can provide more clues.
  3. Most importantly, we can show, without a shadow of a doubt, that it would have been impossible for the Atonement to have taken place in 33 AD. 


I think I would like to start with # 3:


The Atonement In 33 AD Is An Impossibility


  1. The Atonement took place once.


We encountered this crucial truth in Part 2, regarding the term, “once” as it is found in these next passages. Similar to two kinds of baptism - water or Spirit - the Bible speaks of two atonements - “...from the foundation of the world” and in 33 AD. - only the former has substance, the latter is a demonstration or manifestation, if you will:


Hebrews 9:25-26 and 28 maintain: “Nor yet that he [Christ] should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of others; {26} For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once [hapax:G530] in the end of the world hath he appeared [phaneroo:G5319] to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. ... {28} So Christ was once [hapax:G530] offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.”


The other thing that immediately catches our attention are the three Greek words in the phrase, “since [apo:G575] the foundation [katabole:G2602] of the world,” [kosmos:G2889]. Why start with “the foundation of the world”? Why start at that particular point? After all, the context is speaking of priests offering sacrifices for sin, and the Levitical priesthood would not be instituted for many thousands of years to come. The proponents of the 33 AD atonement are very much aware of Revelation 13:8, 


“And all that dwell upon the earth shall worship him, whose names are not written in the book of life of the Lamb slain from [apo:G575] the foundation [katabole:G2602]  of the world.” [kosmos:G2889]


They know that they cannot dismiss this verse if they are to be honest in their Bible study. So what do they do? They merely explain it away by saying: “This was done ‘in principle,’ because what God decrees will certainly come to pass, so it’s as good as done.” And we must bear in mind that many of us, myself included, held to this very notion for decades.


Incidentally, the exact phrase in Hebrews 9:26 surfaces in Revelation 13:8 - from [apo:G575] the foundation [katabole:G2602] of the world.” [kosmos:G2889] Furthermore, there are other verses that we will be discussing in this series that affirm the same truth besides Revelation 13:8. But for now, let’s go back to the term, “once” that we were analyzing:


1 Peter 3:18 further adds, “For Christ also hath once [hapax:G530] suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened by the Spirit:”


There is also a related word, also rendered as “once” (ephapax:G2178) in Hebrews 7:27; it is a compound Greek term, and  its main word is “hapax” (G530): 


“Who needeth not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people's: for this he did once [ephapax:G530], when he offered up himself.”


Three other citations also contain this same term, “once” (ephapax:G530):


Romans 6:10 likewise announces: “For in that he died, he died unto sin once: [ephapax:G2178] but in that he liveth, he liveth unto God.”


Hebrews 9:12 echoes this as well: “Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once [ephapax:G2178] into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption [for us].”


Verse 10 of Hebrews 10:5-10, and 14-20 reiterate the same: “Wherefore when he cometh into the world, he saith, Sacrifice and offering [prosphora:G4376] thou wouldest not, but a body [soma:G4983] hast thou prepared me: {6} In burnt offerings and [sacrifices] for sin thou hast had no pleasure. {7} Then said I, Lo, I come (in the volume of the book it is written of me,) to do thy will, O God. {8} Above when he said, Sacrifice and offering [prosphora:G4376]  and burnt offerings and [offering] for sin thou wouldest not, neither hadst pleasure [therein]; which are offered [prosphero:G4374] by the law; {9} Then said he, Lo, I come to do thy will, O God. He taketh away the first, that he may establish the second. {10} By the which will we are sanctified through the offering [prosphora:G4376] of the body [soma:G4983] of Jesus Christ once [ephapax:G2178] [for all]. {11} And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering [prosphero:G4374]  oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins: {12} But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for ever, sat down on the right hand of God; {13} From henceforth expecting till his enemies be made his footstool. {14} For by one offering [prosphora:G4376] he hath perfected for ever them that are sanctified. {15} [Whereof] the Holy Ghost also is a witness to us: for after that he had said before, {16} This [is] the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; {17} And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. {18} Now where remission of these [is, there is] no more offering [prosphora:G4376] for sin. {19} Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, {20} By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, [katapetasma:G2665]  that is to say, his flesh; ” [sarx:G4561]


Notice how God is linking the word, “body” (soma:G4983) used twice in this passage along with the Greek noun, “offering,” (prosphora:G4376) which crops up five times in this portion of Scripture, along with its verb form, “are offered” in verses 8 and 11. G4376 is also found in Ephesians 5:2, as “an offering”:


“And walk in love, as Christ also hath loved us, and hath given himself for us an offering [prosphora:G4376] and a sacrifice to God for a sweetsmelling savour.”


Flesh [sarx:G4561]


I would like to now consider the term, “flesh” (sarx:G4561) that was quoted a few minutes ago in Hebrews 10:20, “By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, [katapetasma:G2665]  that is to say, his flesh.” [sarx:G4561] In a later study, we will turn our attention to the word “veil,” which is also quite significant. The following citations reveal some of the ways that God employs this word, “flesh”:


In Ephesians 2:15 we learn that  “Having abolished in his flesh [sarx:G4561] the enmity, [even] the law of commandments [contained] in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, [so] making peace;”


John 1:14, “And the Word was made flesh, [sarx:G4561] and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.”


In John 6:51-56, and 63, this word is found 7 times, in which Christ is spiritually associating His “flesh” with “bread,” in fulfillment of Matthew 4:4 (“But he answered and said, It is written, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceedeth out of the mouth of God.”): “I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, [sarx:G4561] which I will give for the life of the world. {52} The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us [his] flesh [sarx:G4561] to eat? {53} Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh [sarx:G4561] of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you. {54} Whoso eateth my flesh, [sarx:G4561] and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. {55} For my flesh [sarx:G4561] is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. {56} He that eateth my flesh, [sarx:G4561] and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him. ... {63} It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh [sarx:G4561] profiteth nothing: the words that I speak unto you, [they] are spirit, and [they] are life.”


Christ’s “body” is also identified with “sinful flesh,” along with its condemnation in the Atonement according to Romans 8:3, “For what the law could not do, in that it was weak through the flesh, [sarx:G4561] God sending his own Son in the likeness of sinful flesh, [sarx:G4561] and for sin, condemned sin in the flesh:” [sarx:G4561]


Acts 2:22-31 is an extremely significant passage because it is recounting what took place in 33 AD, and is actually quoting both Psalm 16:8-11, and Psalm 132:11, “Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know: {23} Him, being delivered by the determinate counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: {24} Whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death: because it was not possible that he should be holden of it. {25} For David speaketh concerning him, I foresaw the Lord always before my face, for he is on my right hand, that I should not be moved: {26} Therefore did my heart rejoice, and my tongue was glad; moreover also my flesh [sarx:G4561] shall rest in hope: {27} Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. {28} Thou hast made known to me the ways of life; thou shalt make me full of joy with thy countenance. {29} Men [and] brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulchre is with us unto this day. {30} Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him, that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, [sarx:G4561] he would raise up Christ to sit on his throne; {31} He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his [autos:G846] soul [psyche:G5590] was [kataleipo:G2641] not [ou:G3756] left [kataleipo:G2641] in [eis:G1519] hell [hades:G86], neither his flesh [sarx:G4561] did see [eido:G1492] corruption.” [diaphthora:G1312]


This passage is explaining in no uncertain terms what occurred in 33 AD, namely that Christ’s body was not left in the “grave”(“hell”) , and neither did his “flesh” undergo “corruption” or the natural process of decay that begins at the moment of death. What this signifies brings us to point #...


       2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and did not decay in     

           33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.


However to prove this I will need to do a “word bridge” between Psalm 16:8-11 and Psalm 132:11, and contrast that with Acts 2:25-31, to show that both the “grave” as well as “corruption”  are intimately identified with sin. We won’t have time for that today, so that it will have to be the subject of our next study.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 5

February 3, 2019


Today’s date is February 3, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 5. In this series, we are examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


Why The Atonement In 33 AD Is An Impossibility


In our previous study we began considering the first two reasons “why the atonement in 33 AD is an impossibility,” namely:


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.


At the close of our last study I said that today we would offer proof for point #2, by doing a “word bridge” between Psalm 16:8-11 and Psalm 132:11, and contrast them with Acts 2:25-31, to show that both the “grave” as well as “corruption”  are intimately identified with sin; in other words, if Christ’s body was not left in the grave, and did not experience decay, how could He be bearing sin? Let’s review those passages again:


Psalm 16:8-11 states: “I have set the LORD always before me: because [he is] at my right hand, I shall not be moved. {9} Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoiceth: my flesh also shall rest in hope. {10} For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. {11} Thou wilt shew me the path of life: in thy presence [is] fulness of joy; at thy right hand [there are] pleasures for evermore.”


And Psalm 132:11 reveals, “The LORD hath sworn [in] truth unto David; he will not turn from it; Of the fruit of thy body will I set upon thy throne.” 


Let’s compare those verses with Acts 2:25-31, “For David speaketh concerning him, I foresaw the Lord always before my face, for he is on my right hand, that I should not be moved: {26} Therefore did my heart rejoice, and my tongue was glad; moreover also my flesh shall rest in hope: {27} Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. {28} Thou hast made known to me the ways of life; thou shalt make me full of joy with thy countenance. {29} Men [and] brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulchre is with us unto this day. {30} Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him, that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, he would raise up Christ to sit on his throne; {31} He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption.”


In the interest of time, I’m going to only compare Psalm 16:10 with Acts 2:27, and the almost identical wording in Acts 2:31, because we want to substantiate from Scripture that indeed corruption and decay are intimately associated with death, which is a direct result of sin, as Romans 6:23a and James 1:14-15 affirm, and a plethora of other citations in both the Old and New Testaments:


“For the wages of sin [is] death…”


“But every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. {15} Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death.”


Let’s begin with the Greek first and then we will turn to its Hebrew equivalent, “Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell…” in Psalm 16:10 and Acts 2:27 respectively:


Because [hoti:G3754] Thou Wilt [egkataleipo:G1459] Not [ou:G3756] Leave [egkataleipo:G1459] My [mou:G3450] Soul [psyche:G5590] In [eis:G1519] Hell [hades:G86]


Thou Wilt  [egkataleipo:G1459] Not [ou:G3756] Leave [egkataleipo:G1459]


The first thing that we want to reiterate is that Christ’s soul (or “life”) was not left in Hell, which the Scriptures define as the “grave;” He was not left in the grave.  This was addressed previously in the series on “Annihilation Or Eternal Suffering.”  In what other ways does God employ these two terms, “thou wilt [not] leave”? Actually only one other passage contains both of these expressions, and they surface together in 2 Corinthians 4:9, as “not” and “forsaken”:


“Persecuted, but not  [ou:G3756] forsaken [egkataleipo:G1459]; cast down, but not  [ou:G3756] destroyed;”


Regardless of how much a genuine Christian is called to suffer, these two words emphasize that God will “never leave” them, nor “forsake” them, as we also read in Hebrews 13:5, in which G1459 is rendered as “forsake”: 


“[Let your] conversation [be] without covetousness; [and be] content with such things as ye have: for he hath said, I will never leave thee, nor forsake [egkataleipo:G1459]  thee.”


We also recognize that other people might forsake God’s chosen people, as Paul, under divine inspiration, makes note of in 2 Timothy 4:10 and 16, “For Demas hath forsaken [egkataleipo:G1459] me, having loved this present world, and is departed unto Thessalonica; Crescens to Galatia, Titus unto Dalmatia. ... {16} At my first answer no man stood with me, but all [men] forsook [egkataleipo:G1459] me: [I pray God] that it may not be laid to their charge.”


Now, if Christ’s soul was not left in the grave, how then do we reconcile the statements found in the parallel passages of Matthew 27:46, and Mark 15:34 respectively? 


The former testifies: “And about the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken [egkataleipo:G1459] me?”


And the latter concurs:“And at the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani? which is, being interpreted, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken [egkataleipo:G1459] me?”


Of course, those who attempt to defend the notion that the payment for sin took place in 33 AD have an answer for this as well. They assert that God could so intensify and compress Christ’s suffering (which many of them believe is eternal punishment) into a time frame of three hours (6th - 9th hours), during which Christ supposedly atoned for the sins of the likes of Abel, along with every other child of God since, and even those still to be born into this sin-cursed earth after 33 AD. I too, accepted this same teaching, as I’m sure many of you did as well, but this is one of the wonderful aspects of Bible study, and that is to be open to “correction,” as 2 Timothy 3:16-17 acknowledges,


“All scripture [is] given by inspiration of God, and [is] profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction [epanothosis:G1882], for instruction in righteousness: {17} That the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works.”

My [mou:G3450] Soul [psyche:G5590]


One discovers, among other places, the two words, “my life or “my soul” in the following passages that particularly refer to Christ:


John 10:15 and 17 record: “As the Father knoweth me, even so know I the Father: and I lay down my [mou:G3450] life [psyche:G5590] for the sheep. ... {17} Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my [mou:G3450] life [psyche:G5590] that I might take it again.”


Likewise, John 12:27 testifies: “Now is my [mou:G3450] soul [psyche:G5590] troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour.”


In [eis:G1519] Hell [hades:G86]


The last two terms in the first half of Acts 2:27, “in hell” or “in the grave” only crop up in two other places besides Acts 2:27 and 31 - namely Revelation 1:8 and 20:14,


I’ll read Acts 2:27 and 31 again, as the additional emphasis in verse 31 is focused on the resurrection, which had to have taken place in 33 AD, since Christ’s life was not left in the grave, and he did not experience decay or “corruption;” spiritually we understand that His resurrection in 33 AD exemplifies the former resurrection that occurred prior to Creation, when His soul was not only left in Hell (albeit temporarily), but worse as He was annihilated, after which He rose from the dead, as John 10:17 affirmed earlier: “Because thou wilt not leave my soul in [eis:G1519] hell [hades:G86], neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. ... {31} He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in [eis:G1519] hell [hades:G86], neither his flesh did see corruption.”


Revelation 1:18 gloriously proclaims: “I [am] he that liveth, and was dead; and, behold, I am alive for [eis:G1519]  evermore, Amen; and have the keys of hell [hades:G86] and of death.”


And Revelation 20:14 makes this declaration: “And death and hell [hades:G86] were cast into [eis:G1519]  the lake of fire. This is the second death.”


For Thou Wilt Not Leave [`azab:G5800] My Soul [nephesh:G5315] In Hell [she’owl:H7585]


We now want to turn our attention to Psalm 16:10, and the Hebrew equivalent, “For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell...”  which is comprised of three Hebrew words, and see what truths God has hidden in these three expressions that might be different or that might serve to reinforce what we just learned from Acts 2:27. 


For Thou Wilt Not Leave [`azab:G5800]


The Hebrew term, “for thou wilt not leave” also shows up in the following citations:


Isaiah 41:17 maintains: “[When] the poor and needy seek water, and [there is] none, [and] their tongue faileth for thirst, I the LORD will hear them, I the God of Israel will not forsake [`azab:H5800] them.”


Similarly, Isaiah 42:16 states: “And I will bring the blind by a way [that] they knew not; I will lead them in paths [that] they have not known: I will make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. These things will I do unto them, and not forsake [`azab:H5800] them.”


And Isaiah 62:12 likewise affirms: “And they shall call them, The holy people, The redeemed of the LORD: and thou shalt be called, Sought out, A city not forsaken.” [`azab:H5800]


Another illustration of how God utilizes this expression emerges in  Psalm 40:12, in which this term, “thou wilt not leave” is rendered as “faileth”:


“For innumerable evils have compassed [’aphaph:H661] me about: mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, so that I am not able to look up; they are more than the hairs of mine head: therefore my heart faileth [`azab:H5800]

 Me.”


This is a very significant verse for a couple of reasons (at least). One is that it helps us to understand something about the publican in Luke 18:13,


“And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as [his] eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.


Did you notice the connection between Psalm 40:12 and Luke 18:13? The publican “... would not lift up so much as [his] eyes unto heaven… Why? Psalm 40:12 reveals: “...mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, so that I am not able to look up…” This is why the publican and all of God’s elect did what he did next during the day of salvation: “...but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.”


Secondly, our word, “faileth,” (G5800) or “thou wilt leave” is a consequence of “mine iniquities have taken hold upon me,” and “...innumerable evils have compassed [’aphaph:H661] me about…” In this we can see Christ being subjected to sin, death, and annihilation, which took place prior to Creation:






My Soul [nephesh:G5315] In Hell [she’owl:H7585]


The last two terms in Psalm 16:10, “my soul” and “in hell” are also found in another exceedingly important account - in Jonah 2:1-6,


Jonah 2:1-6 outlines the essence of being “left in the grave” typified by the “fish’s belly”: “Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish's belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly [or “womb”] of hell [she`owl:H7585] cried I, [and] thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about [’aphaph:H661] [even] to the soul [nephesh:G5315]: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars [was] about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God.”


I think we’ll stop here today. Lord willing, in our next study we will continue this “word bridge” between Psalm 16:10 and Acts 2:27 and 31.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 6

February 10, 2019


Today’s date is February 10, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 6. In this series, we are examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have concluded the following thus far:


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.


In providing proof for this second point, we began a word bridge between Psalm 16:10 and Acts 2:27 previously, and I would like to continue that today as well. We left off at the last half in both of these references. To refresh our memories, I’ll read them again:


Psalm 16:10 states: “For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer [nathan:H5414] thine Holy One [chaycid:H2623] to see [ra’ah:H7200] corruption.” [shachath:H7845]


And Acts 2:27 likewise asserts: “Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither [oude:G3761] wilt thou suffer [didomi:G1325] thine [sou:G4675] Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see [eido:G1492] corruption.” [diaphthora:G1312]


Neither Wilt Thou Suffer [nathan:H5414] Thine Holy One [chaycid:H2623]


Let’s begin by considering the first two words in Psalm 16:10, “neither wilt thou suffer” (nathan:H5414) and “thine Holy One” (chaciyd:H2623), which are only found together in one other intriguing passage in Psalm 79:2, in which these two terms are rendered as: “have they given” and “of thy saints,” which is speaking of God’s elect:  


“The dead bodies of thy servants have they given [nathan:H5414]  [to be] meat unto the fowls of the heaven, the flesh of thy saints [chaycid:H2623]

 unto the beasts of the earth.”


To See [ra’ah:H7200] Corruption [shachath:H7845]


The next two words in Psalm 16:10 are highly significant, and we will discover that they actually dovetail with BMI’s previous series on “Annihilation or Eternal Suffering,” and form the basis for why Christ could not have been “bearing sin” in 33 AD. These two words surface together in two other citations:


In Job 33:28 we read the following, in which the same word for “his soul” (nephesh:H5315) as in Psalm 16:10 appears here as well:  “He will deliver his soul  [nephesh:H5315] from going into the pit [shachath:H7845], and his life shall see [ra’ah:H7200] the light.”


Psalm 49:9 similarly discloses: “That he should still live for ever, [and] not see [ra’ah:H7200] corruption.” [shachath:H7845]





[And] Not See [ra’ah:H7200]


I would like to take a closer look at this word “see,” (ra’ah:H7200)  which can also imply “experience” as the following verses demonstrate:


Lamentations 3:1 acknowledges, “I [am] the man [that] hath seen [ra’ah:H7200] affliction by the rod of his wrath.”


Psalm 89:48 queries,“What man [is he that] liveth, and shall not see [ra’ah:H7200] death? shall he deliver his soul from the hand of the grave? Selah.”


Psalm 27:13 likewise affirms, “[I had fainted], unless I had believed to see [ra’ah:H7200 the goodness of the LORD in the land of the living.”


Also Psalm 34:8 and 12 offer this instruction: “O taste and see [ra’ah:H7200] that the LORD [is] good: blessed [is] the man [that] trusteth in him. ... {12} What man [is he that] desireth life, [and] loveth [many] days, that he may see [ra’ah:H7200] good?”


Corruption  [shachath:H7845]


Next I would like for us to focus more closely on the word, “corruption” (shachath:H7845), which is vitally relevant to our study, as it is predominantly translated as “pit,” signifying “hell,” or the grave, and thus intersects our previous study on Annihilation or Eternal Suffering, as I noted earlier. It is rendered as “corruption” four times, as pit 14 times, twice as “destruction and “ditch,” and once as the “grave,” for a total of 23 times. As we consider some of the ways that God utilizes this word, let’s keep in mind our Hebrew theme verse - Psalm 16:10 - “For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell [she’owl:H7585]; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption.” [shachath:H7845]. Please note that the two words, “hell” and “corruption” are actually interchangeable.


In Job 9:30-31 this word is rendered, “in the ditch,” with regard to Job who typifies the Lord Jesus under the wrath of God, who typifies the Lord Jesus under the wrath of God:  “If I wash myself with snow water, and make my hands never so clean; {31}Yet shalt thou plunge me in the ditch, [shachath:H7845] and mine own clothes shall abhor me.”


This is also the case in verse 14 of Job 17:13-15, “If I wait, the grave [is] mine house: I have made my bed in the darkness. {14} I have said to corruption, [shachath:H7845] Thou [art] my father: to the worm, [Thou art] my mother, and my sister. {15} And where [is] now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it?”


Job 33:18, and 22, 24, and 30, “He keepeth back his soul from the pit, [shachath:H7845] and his life from perishing by the sword. ... {22} Yea, his soul draweth near unto the grave, [shachath:H7845] and his life to the destroyers. ... {24} Then he is gracious unto him, and saith, Deliver him from going down to the pit: [shachath:H7845] I have found a ransom. … {30} To bring back his soul from the pit, [shachath:H7845] to be enlightened with the light of the living.”


Verse 15 of Psalm 9:15-17 describes the end of the non-elect: “The heathen are sunk down in the pit [shachath:H7845] [that] they made: in the net which they hid is their own foot taken. {16} The LORD is known [by] the judgment [which] he executeth: the wicked is snared in the work of his own hands. Higgaion. Selah. {17} The wicked shall be turned into hell, [and] all the nations that forget God.” 


Similarly, Psalm 55:23 translates this word as “of destruction,” referring to all that remain unsaved: “But thou, O God, shalt bring them down into the pit of destruction: [shachath:H7845] bloody and deceitful men shall not live out half their days; but I will trust in thee.”


Psalm 103:4 contains this same term, “destruction” and highlights the wonder of salvation that God extended to each of His elect, when that was still possible: “Who redeemeth thy life from destruction; [shachath:H7845] who crowneth thee with lovingkindness and tender mercies;


In similar fashion, Isaiah 38:17 renders this “from the pit”: “Behold, for peace I had great bitterness: but thou hast in love to my soul [delivered it] from the pit [shachath:H7845] of corruption: for thou hast cast all my sins behind thy back.”


Lastly, Jonah 2:6 is especially relevant, as it  underscores, Christ under the wrath of God “...from the foundation of the world;” moreover, the setting takes place within “the belly [or womb”] of hell,” [or the “grave”]: “Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish's belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, [and] thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, [even] to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars [was] about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, [shachath:H7845] O LORD my God.


In a future study in this series, I would like to do an in-depth analysis of this portion of Scripture, but for now let us turn our attention to the last half of Acts 2:27, which mirrors the last part of Psalm 16:10.


Wilt Thou Suffer [didomi:G1325] AND Holy One [hosios:G3741]


The first two main terms in the last half of Acts 2:27, “wilt thou suffer” and “Holy One” only surface together in two other verses, that reference Psalm 16:10 as well, namely Acts 13:34-35; I’ll read verses 32-37,


“And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, {33} God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. {34} And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, [now] no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give [didomi:G1325] you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David. {35} Wherefore he saith also in another [psalm], Thou shalt [didomi:G1325] not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see corruption.”


There are a number of things in this passage which pique our curiosity, and will need to be researched further:


  • In verse 33 we read “...this day have I begotten thee,” which speaks of birth and regeneration.
  • In verse 34 we find the unusual statement, “...now no more to return to corruption...”
  • In Acts 13:35, “Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see corruption” is in the negative, whereas the same two words in verse 34 are denoted positively in verse 34: I will give  [didomi:G1325]  you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741]  of David.”


To See [eido:G1492] Corruption [diaphthora:G1312]


The last two words that we want to investigate in Acts 2:27 are “to see” (eido:G1492) and “corruption” (diaphthora:G1312), and they are found together in 4 verses, regarding this same account:


Acts 2:31 testifies: “He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see [eido:G1492]  corruption.” [diaphthora:G1312]


Likewise, Acts 13:35-37 reveals: “Wherefore he saith also in another [psalm], Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. [diaphthora:G1312] {36} For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption [diaphthora:G1312]: {37} But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption.” [diaphthora:G1312]




The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 7

February 17, 2019


Today’s date is February 17, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 7. In this series, we are examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have concluded the following thus far:


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.


In providing proof for this second point, we did a “word bridge” between Psalm 16:10 and Acts 2:27 in our last two studies. I’ll quote both of those verses again: 


Psalm 16:10 states: “For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer [nathan:H5414] thine Holy One [chaycid:H2623] to see [ra’ah:H7200] corruption.” [shachath:H7845]


And Acts 2:27 likewise asserts: “Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither [oude:G3761] wilt thou suffer [didomi:G1325] thine [sou:G4675] Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see [eido:G1492] corruption.” [diaphthora:G1312]

I would like to comment further on a few points that emerged from this word bridge, having to do with two terms in Acts 2:27, “wilt thou suffer” [or “allow”] (didomi:G1325) and “Holy One” (hosios:G3741) 


“Wilt Thou Suffer” [didomi:G1325] And “Holy One” [hosios:G3741]


The first two main terms in the last half of Acts 2:27, “wilt thou suffer” and “Holy One” only surface together in two other verses that reference Psalm 16:10 as well, namely Acts 13:34-35; I’ll read verses 32-37,


“And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, {33} God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up [anistemi:G450] Jesus again [anistemi:G450]; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee. {34} And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, [now] no more to return [hypostrepho:G5290] to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give [didomi:G1325] you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David. {35} Wherefore he saith also in another [psalm], Thou shalt [didomi:G1325] not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see corruption.”


There are a number of things in this passage which I would like to address today: 


  1. In Acts 13:33 we read in that he hath raised up [anistemi:G450] Jesus again” [anistemi:G450] and then quotes from Psalm 2:7b “...this day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee,” which speaks of resurrection as well as birth and regeneration.


  1. In Acts 13:34 we also find the unusual statement, “...now no more to return

           [hypostrepho:G5290] to corruption...”


  1. In Acts 13:35, “Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [didomi:G1325] to see corruption” is in the negative, whereas the same  two words in verse 34 are denoted positively in verse 34: I will give [didomi:G1325]  you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741]  of David.”


# 1 In That He Hath Raised Up Again [anistemi:G450 - “an-is’-tay-mee”]


Let’s begin by looking at this unique Greek word in Acts 13:33, rendered, “in that he hath raised up (Jesus) again.” 


Why does it say “again,” which denotes a second time? 


And how  are we do understand the correlation between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:7b? 


This term (G450) is primarily translated 112 times as some form of “rise” or “rise up” or “raise” or “raise up,” “arise,”  or “stood,” etc. However, curiously in the following 13 citations, it is translated as some form of “rise again,” in spite of the fact that some commentaries say that the Greek does not convey this idea of “again.” As a matter of fact, Jay P. Green, in his Greek interlinear translates this word as “raising up.”  What we are going to find is that this term is going to lead us through a number of different Scriptural pathways, but they are all going to wind up at the same destination and reveal “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world” in all of His majesty, power, and glory. 


1Thessalonians 4:14 states: “For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again [anistemi:G450], even so them also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him.”


Acts 17:3 declares: “Opening and alleging, that Christ must needs have suffered, and risen again [anistemi:G450] from the dead; and that this Jesus, whom I preach unto you, is Christ.”


Likewise John 6:39 affirms, “And this is the Father's will which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise [anistemi:G450] it up again [anistemi:G450] at the last day.”


Matthew 17:9 concurs: “And as they came down from the mountain, Jesus charged them, saying, Tell the vision to no man, until the Son of man be risen again [anistemi:G450] from the dead.”


Matthew 20:19 adds: “And shall deliver him to the Gentiles to mock, and to scourge, and to crucify [him]: and the third day he shall rise again.” [anistemi:G450]

 

Mark 10:34, “And they shall mock him, and shall scourge him, and shall spit upon him, and shall kill him: and the third day he shall rise again.” [anistemi:G450]


Luke 9:8 and 19 maintain, “And of some, that Elias had appeared; and of others, that one of the old prophets was risen again. [anistemi:G450]... {19} They answering said, John the Baptist; but some [say], Elias; and others [say], that one of the old prophets is risen again.” [anistemi:G450]


This is also the case in Luke 24:7, “Saying, The Son of man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.” [anistemi:G450]


Speaking of Lazarus who had died as well as any other child of God, John 11:23-24 testifies: “Jesus saith unto her, Thy brother shall rise again. [anistemi:G450] {24} Martha saith unto him, I know that he shall rise again [anistemi:G450] in the resurrection at the last day.”


Verse 9 of John 20 includes this word, and I will read verses 1-9 for the sake of the context: “The first [day] of the week of the [Sunday] sabbaths cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre. {2} Then she runneth, and cometh to Simon Peter, and to the other disciple, whom Jesus loved, and saith unto them, They have taken away the Lord out of the sepulchre, and we know not where they have laid him. {3} Peter therefore went forth, and that other disciple, and came to the sepulchre. {4} So they ran both together: and the other disciple did outrun Peter, and came first to the sepulchre. {5} And he stooping down, [and looking in], saw the linen clothes lying; yet went he not in. {6} Then cometh Simon Peter following him, and went into the sepulchre, and seeth the linen clothes lie, {7} And the napkin, that was about his head, not lying with the linen clothes, but wrapped together in a place by itself. {8} Then went in also that other disciple, which came first to the sepulchre, and he saw, and believed. {9} For as yet they knew not the scripture, that he must rise again [anistemi:G450] from the dead.”


Verse 9 is a remarkable statement, given the fact that Jesus had told His followers repeatedly that He would rise from the dead. This again underscores the absolute necessity that God must open one’s understanding of even the simplest of Biblical truths, as our last citation, verse 33 of Luke 18:31-34, which I have referred to numerous times acknowledges:


“Then he took [unto him] the twelve, and said unto them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished. {32} For he shall be delivered unto the Gentiles, and shall be mocked, and spitefully entreated, and spitted on: {33} And they shall scourge [him], and put him to death: and the third day he shall rise again. [anistemi:G450] {34} And they understood none of these things: and this saying was hid from them, neither knew they the things which were spoken.”


Another Illustration Of “Anistemi” (G450) - Melchisedec


Hebrews 7:11 and 15 also contain the term, “anistemi,” without adding the word “again,” which I only want to mention, but I won’t develop this now, because I want to do a “word bridge” between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:7b first: “If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need [was there] that another priest should rise [anistemi:G450] after the order of Melchisedec, and not be called after the order of Aaron? ... {15} And it is yet far more evident: for that after the similitude of Melchisedec there ariseth [anistemi:G450] another priest,”


What does God have in mind by bringing up Melchisedec in connection with our word, “anistemi” (G450)? Ponder that if you will, because we will revisit Melchisedec in a future study.


#1b A Word Bridge Between Acts 13:33 And Psalm 2:7b 


I would now like us to compare the phrase in Acts 13:33, 


“Thou [sy:G4771] art [ei:G1488] my [mou:G3450] Son [huios:G5207], this day [semeron:G4594] have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee” 


with its Hebrew equivalent in Psalm 2:7b: I’ll read verses 6 and 7, as I want to discuss verse 6, (and in particular, the expression, “Yet have I set”) which we will discover is another major factor in our study:


Psalm 2:6-7, Yet have I set [nacak:H5258] my king upon my holy hill of Zion. {7} I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son [ben:H1121]; this day [yowm:H3117] have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


 Have I Begotten [gennao:G1080] Versus  Have I Begotten [yalad:H3205]


For the time being, let’s just concentrate on the term, “have I begotten” in both the Greek and Hebrew to see if we can pick out any similarities or dissimilarities:


 Have I Begotten [gennao:G1080]


Here are some examples of how God has chosen to use this word, which is found just under 100 times in the New Testament, and is rendered predominantly as “begat” or “be born.” We have to be cautious in applying this term, “begat” or “be born” to the Lord Jesus Christ as we are speaking of God the Son, Who is actually described in Hebrews 7:3, as Melchisedec (and I’m giving away a foretaste of a future study dedicated to this mysterious “Priest” and “King”) by these seven divine characteristics: 


“Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.”


Nonetheless, God does use this word to express the incomprehensible reality of the “...Word was made flesh…” as the following passages illustrate:


Luke 1:26-35 announces: “And in the sixth month the angel Gabriel was sent from God unto a city of Galilee, named Nazareth, {27} To a virgin espoused to a man whose name was Joseph, of the house of David; and the virgin's name [was] Mary. {28} And the angel came in unto her, and said, Hail, [thou that art] highly favoured, the Lord [is] with thee: blessed [art] thou among women. {29} And when she saw [him], she was troubled at his saying, and cast in her mind what manner of salutation this should be. {30} And the angel said unto her, Fear not, Mary: for thou hast found favour with God. {31} And, behold, thou shalt conceive in thy womb, and bring forth a son, and shalt call his name JESUS. {32} He shall be great, and shall be called the Son of the Highest: and the Lord God shall give unto him the throne of his father David: {33} And he shall reign over the house of Jacob for ever; and of his kingdom there shall be no end. {34} Then said Mary unto the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? {35} and the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born [gennao:G1080] of thee shall be called the Son of God.”


In verse 5 of Hebrews 5:5-10 we also read: “So also Christ glorified not himself to be made an high priest; but he that said unto him, Thou art my Son, to day have  [gennao:G1080]  I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee. {6} As he saith also in another [place], Thou [art] a priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec. {7} Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared; {8} Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered; {9} And being made perfect, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him; {10} Called of God an high priest after the order of Melchisedec.”


Hebrews 1:1-6 also reveals: “God, who at sundry times and in divers manners spake in time past unto the fathers by the prophets, {2} Hath in these last days spoken unto us by [his] Son, whom he hath appointed heir of all things, by whom also he made the worlds; {3} Who being the brightness of [his] glory, and the express image of his person, and upholding all things by the word of his power, when he had by himself purged our sins, sat down on the right hand of the Majesty on high; {4} Being made so much better than the angels, as he hath by inheritance obtained a more excellent name than they. {5} For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou art my Son, this day have  [gennao:G1080]  I begotten  [gennao:G1080]  thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son? {6} And again, when he bringeth in the firstbegotten [prototokos:G4416] into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.”


Please note the term, “the firstbegotten” (prototokos:G4416) in verse 6, which we won’t have time to expand upon today, but we will in a future study in this series. As you can see there are many “avenues” that still need to be researched. Lord willing, in our next study we will begin by looking at the Hebrew term, “have I begotten” (yalad:H3205) in Psalm 2:7b

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 8

February 24, 2019


Today’s date is February 24, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 8. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have concluded the following thus far, and after today’s study we will be able to add to this list:


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.


In providing proof for this second point, we began a word bridge between Psalm 16:10 and Acts 2:27 in study #6. To refresh our memories, I’ll read those two citations again:


Psalm 16:10 states: “For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer [nathan:H5414] thine Holy One [chaycid:H2623] to see [ra’ah:H7200] corruption.” [shachath:H7845]


And Acts 2:27 likewise asserts: “Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither [oude:G3761] wilt thou suffer [didomi:G1325] thine [sou:G4675] Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see [eido:G1492] corruption.” [diaphthora:G1312]


“Wilt Thou Suffer” [didomi:G1325] And “Holy One” [hosios:G3741]


We also discovered that the first two main terms in the last half of Acts 2:27, “wilt thou suffer” and “Holy One” only surface together in two other verses that reference Psalm 16:10 as well, namely Acts 13:34-35; I’ll read verses 32-37 for the sake of the context:


“And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, {33} God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up [anistemi:G450] Jesus again [anistemi:G450]; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee. {34} And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, [now] no more to return [hypostrepho:G5290] to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give [didomi:G1325] you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David. {35} Wherefore he saith also in another [psalm], Thou shalt [didomi:G1325] not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see corruption.”


There are three aspects in this passage that are intriguing which we began to address, and so far we are on point #1:  


  1. In Acts 13:33 we read in that he hath raised up [anistemi:G450] Jesus again” [anistemi:G450] which is followed by a quotation from Psalm 2:7b “...this day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee,” which speaks of resurrection as well as birth and regeneration.


  1. In Acts 13:34 we also find the unusual statement, “...now no more to return

           [hypostrepho:G5290] to corruption...”


  1. Lastly, in Acts 13:35, “Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [didomi:G1325] to see corruption” is in the negative, whereas the same  two words in verse 34 are denoted positively in verse 34: I will give [didomi:G1325]  you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David.”


A Word Bridge Between Acts 13:33 And Psalm 2:7b 


In study #7 we began a “word bridge” between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:6-7, and we discussed the Greek term, “have I begotten.” I’ll read those Scriptures again: 


“Thou [sy:G4771] art [ei:G1488] my [mou:G3450] Son [huios:G5207], this day [semeron:G4594] have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee” 


Psalm 2:6-7, Yet have I set [nacak:H5258] my king upon my holy hill of Zion. {7} I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son [ben:H1121]; this day [yowm:H3117] have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


Our examination of this Greek term “have I begotten” (gennao:1080) lead us to two exceedingly important verses - Hebrews 5:5 and Hebrews 1:5-6 - the former makes reference to Melchisedec; the latter to Christ being described as “the firstbegotten” (prototokos:G4416) in verse 6. Except for these two passages, every other verse in which “gennao” (G1080) is found speaks of physical or spiritual birth (i.e., salvation), but these verses are also speaking of a kind of “birth,” as we shall presently see. As a result, the subsequent questions come to mind. 


What purpose does God have by relating the Greek term “have I begotten” (gennao:1080) in Hebrews 5:5 with Melchisedec, and why is He linking it with another Greek term, “the firstbegotten” in Hebrews 1:6.  So let’s begin, with the latter first: 


The Firstbegotten [prototokos:G4416]


This compound Greek expression “firstbegotten,” or “firstborn” is literally made up of these two words, and occurs in eight other references, and can pertain to physical birth as Matthew 1:25 acknowledges - but not always - as we shall see shortly... 


“And knew her not till she had brought forth her firstborn [prototokos:G4416] son: and he called his name JESUS.”


Romans 8:29 says, “For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate [to be] conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn [prototokos:G4416] among many brethren.”


Colossians 1:15 and 18 make this monumental proclamation:  “Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn [prototokos:G4416] of every creature: ... {18} And he is the head [kephale:G2776] of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn [prototokos:G4416] from the dead; that in all [things] he might have the preeminence.” [proteuo:G4409]


Hebrews 12:23 explains precisely what the true church consists of: “To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, [prototokos:G4416] which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect,”


Revelation 1:5, “And from Jesus Christ, [who is] the faithful witness, [and] the first begotten [prototokos:G4416] of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood,”


From these Scriptures we can glean the following information:


  • According to Colossians 1:15, Revelation 1:5, and Hebrews 1:6, Christ is the “firstbegotten of the dead” or “firstborn from the dead.”
  • Christ is also “the firstborn of every creature,” as Colossians 1:15 teaches.
  • He is also “the firstborn among many brethren,” as Roman’s 8:29 reveals.
  • Additionally, Christ is also spoken as “the beginning,” “the head of the body,” and has absolute “preeminence” in Colossians 1:18.


What do all these various epithets signify? the firstbegotten of the dead;” the firstborn from the dead;” “the firstborn of every creature,” “the firstborn among many brethren,” “the beginning,” “the head of the body,” and is supremely “preeminent.” Why is God highlighting this title so much? What could He have in view, by doing this? Let’s take a closer look at each of them.


The Firstbegotten [prototokos:G4416] Of [ek:G1537] The Dead [nekros:G3498] / The Firstborn [prototokos:G4416] From [ek:G1537] The Dead [nekros:G3498]


The “firstbegotten” or “firstborn” “from” the dead, or  “of” the dead,  are the same word: “ek” - G1537. This term can only apply to the Lord Jesus Christ in the Resurrection at the foundation of the world, after having successfully atoned for the sins of His elect saints. One of the  reasons  for this is that there were individuals who were raised from the dead before Christ's Resurrection in 33 AD, so He could not have been the “first” to rise from the dead. These include Lazarus, the son of the widow of Nain, Jairus’ daughter, and the son of the Shunamite to name just a few. The other factor to keep in mind is the significance of the term “firstborn” in the Old Testament, which can't be developed at the moment, but I just wanted you to be aware of this; Lord willing,  we can look at this further in a future study. 


The Firstborn [prototokos:G4416] Of Every [pas:G3956] Creature [ktisis:G2937]


The next phrase, “the firstborn of every creature (or “Creation”), is tremendously important as well. We have to be careful with this word “creature,” or “creation,” to somehow assume that Christ was “created,” which He most certainly was not as He is in fact “the Creator,” as one reads in Colossians 1:16, and please note how these verses are sandwiched in between verses 14-18 which I will read for the sake of the context. This portion of Scripture begins by announcing that “redemption” and “forgiveness” are “through” Christ’s “blood,” (not in 33 AD as the context is taking place before Creation) and then moves on to establish Christ’s deity, and in that connection refers to Him, as the “firstborn of every creature” (or “creation”), and a little further down in verse 18 as, “the firstborn from the dead.  So God is linking these two expressions to clarify that they are in fact synonymous. In other words, the “firstborn of every creation” = the firstborn from the dead. And just to make sure that this point is not missed, a triple reference to Him as “Creator,” and not as one who is created (as is erroneously taught by some cults) is presented by the three phrases: For by him were all things created,” and “all things were created by him, and for him,” and “he is before all things, and by him all things consist.” 


“In whom we have redemption through his blood [or “life”], [even] the forgiveness of sins: {15} Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature: {16} For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether [they be] thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: {17} And he is before all things, and by him all things consist. {18} And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all [things] he might have the preeminence.


Incidentally, when we get around to discussing Melchisedec in Hebrews 7:3, we will see how closely what is said of Him parallels what we just read in Colossians 1:

“Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.”


The Firstborn [prototokos:G4416] Among [en:G1722] Many [polys:H4183] Brethren [adelphos:G80]


Let’s move on to the next phrase, which include this term, “firstborn,” in Romans 8:29, “the firstborn among many brethren;” I’ll read verse 28-32,


“And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to [his] purpose. {29} For whom he did foreknow, he also did predestinate [to be] conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the firstborn among many brethren. {30} Moreover whom he did predestinate, them he also called: and whom he called, them he also justified: and whom he justified, them he also glorified. {31} What shall we then say to these things? If God [be] for us, who [can be] against us? {32} He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?”


What are these citations speaking about? God’s election program during the day of salvation. The “brethren” were classified as such through Christ’s Work (and Faith) as the “the firstborn from the dead, among many brethren” Just as He rose from the ashes of death and annihilation, they too were “born again” in their souls at the moment that Christ applied His saving Faith to them during their lifetime. What remains is for them to receive their glorified spiritual bodies at the end of time. This is why the Savior is called the “firstborn among many brethren.”? In Mark 3:34-35 we discover a “definition verse” for this expression, “brethren,” which is translated as “brethren” or “brother” in this passage, speaking of each of God’s elect:


“And he looked round about on them which sat about him, and said, Behold my mother and my brethren! [adelphos:G80] {35} For whosoever shall do the will of God, the same is my brother, [adelphos:G80] and my sister, and mother.”


2 Thessalonians 2:13 pinpoints when this occurred: “But we are bound to give thanks alway to God for you, brethren [adelphos:G80] beloved of the Lord, because God hath from the beginning [arche:G746] chosen you to salvation through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth:”


Let’s now turn our attention to this word “the beginning,” which is the identical term as was noted in Colossians 1:18.  


The Beginning [arche:G746]


We also see this word in Revelation 22:13, translated as “the beginning”:


 “I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning [arche:G746] and the end, the first [protos:G4413] and the last.”


This passage also contains the word, “the first” (protos:G4413), which is the “first” one of two root words that make up our word, “firstborn,” (prototokos:G4416) which we have been discussing. “Protos” (G4413) also surfaces in 1 John 4:19, as “first,” referring to God’s salvation love that was bestowed upon the elect at the foundation of the world,  


“We love him, because he first [protos:G4413] loved us.”


We can now add to our list of Biblical reasons for why the Atonement occurred “...from the foundation of the world”:


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world.”


Lord willing, we will continue to learn more about this inexplicable salvation, as we continue this series:

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 9

March 3, 2019


Today’s date is March 3, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 9. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have discovered a number of word study paths that all lead to the inescapable fact that Christ is indeed “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” So far in our study of comparing “spiritual with spiritual,” we have arrived at the following conclusions: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world.”


A Word Bridge Between Acts 13:33 And Psalm 2:7b 


In study #7 we began a “word bridge” between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:6-7, and we discussed the Greek term, “have I begotten.” I’ll read those Scriptures again: 


“Thou [sy:G4771] art [ei:G1488] my [mou:G3450] Son [huios:G5207], this day [semeron:G4594] have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee” 


Psalm 2:6-7, Yet have I set [nacak:H5258] my king upon my holy hill of Zion. {7} I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son [ben:H1121]; this day [yowm:H3117] have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


Our examination of this Greek term “have I begotten” (gennao:1080) lead us to two exceedingly important verses - Hebrews 5:5 and Hebrews 1:5-6 - the former makes reference to Melchisedec; the latter to Christ being described as “the firstbegotten” (prototokos:G4416) in verse 6. So in our last study (Part 8) we began researching this term, 


The Firstbegotten [prototokos:G4416]


In looking at a number of passages that contain this word, “firstborn,” we discovered the following titles, which we then began to investigate individually:


  • According to Colossians 1:15, Revelation 1:5, and Hebrews 1:6, Christ is the “firstbegotten of the dead” or “firstborn from the dead.”
  • Christ is also “the firstborn of every creature,” as Colossians 1:15 teaches.
  • He is also “the firstborn among many brethren,” as Roman’s 8:29 reveals.
  • Additionally, Christ is also spoken of as “the beginning,” “the head of the body,” and “he might have the preeminence” in Colossians 1:18.


We did not have time to develop these last two phrases in Colossians 1:18 namely, “the head of the body,” and “he might have the preeminence,” which I would now like to address before going back to Acts 13:34-35, and the following issues that piqued our curiosity:


  • In Acts 13:34 we took note of the unusual statement, “...now no more to return [hypostrepho:G5290] to corruption...”


  • And in Acts 13:35 we saw that the terms, “Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741]  to see corruption” are in the negative, whereas the same two words in verse 34 are denoted positively: I will give [didomi:G1325] you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David.”

 

The Head [kephale:G2776] Of The Body [soma:G4983]


We are not surprised that the Savior is called the head of the body,” but when we stop to consider the other titles that surround this expression, “first begotten,” we are immediately on “high alert,” because as we have seen they are directing us back to the atonement “...from the foundation of the world.” These two words are only found together in three other citations, besides Colossians 1:18.


Curiously, in John 20:12 these two terms are found in conjunction with the position  in which Jesus’ body was laid in the tomb: “And seeth two angels in white sitting, the one at the head [kephale:G2776], and the other at the feet [pous:G4228], where the body [soma:G4983] of Jesus had lain.” As an aside, there is an interesting tie-in with Ephesians 1:21-22, in which the identical words for “head,” “feet,” and “body” are employed: 

“And hath put all [things] under his feet [pous:G4228], and gave him [to be] the head [kephale:G2776] over all [things] to the church, {23} Which is his body [soma:G4983], the fulness of him that filleth all in all.” 


Ephesians 5:23 speaks of the relationship between Christ and His Body (the eternal church), paralleling the God-given institution of marriage, as we read in Genesis 2 concerning Adam and Eve: “For the husband is the head [kephale:G2776] of the wife, even as Christ is the head [kephale:G2776] of the church: and he is the saviour of the body.” [soma:G4983]


Verse 19 of Colossians 2:18-19 likewise declares: “Let no man beguile you of your reward in a voluntary humility and worshipping of angels, intruding into those things which he hath not seen, vainly puffed up by his fleshly mind, {19} And not holding the Head [kephale:G2776], from which all the body [soma:G4983] by joints and bands having nourishment ministered, and knit together, increaseth with the increase of God.”


He [autos:G846] Might Have [ginomai:G1096] The Preeminence [proteuo:G4409]


The next phrase that we want to turn our attention to in Colossians 1:18 is: “He might have the preeminence,”  which consists of three words, which are only found together in this verse, so I’m going to focus on the term, “the preeminence” (proteuo:G4409). This word stems from the term “protos” (G4413) which I mentioned in an earlier study; it is the first of two root words that make up the expression, “firtsborn” (proto - tokos:G4416). Let’s examine some of the ways that God utilizes this word, which is primarily rendered as “first” or “chief,” and appears, for instance, in connection with the first two commandments in Mark 12:29-30, “And Jesus answered him, The first [protos:G4413] of all the commandments [is], Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord: {30} And thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy mind, and with all thy strength: this [is] the first [protos:G4413] commandment.”


Acts 26:23 can only be referring to the atonement, at “...the foundation of the world”: “That Christ should suffer, [and] that he should be the first [protos:G4413] that should rise from the dead, and should shew light unto the people, and to the Gentiles.”


1 John 4:19 also acknowledges: “We love him, because he first [protos:G4413] loved us.”


Revelation 1:11 and 17 further testify: “Saying, I am Alpha and Omega, the first [protos:G4413] and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea. ... {17} And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first [protos:G4413] and the last:”


Revelation 2:8 maintains: “And unto the angel of the church in Smyrna write; These things saith the first [protos:G4413] and the last, which was dead, and is alive;”


Lastly, Revelation 22:13 affirms, “I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first [protos:G4413] and the last.”


These foregoing verses emphasize the reality that Christ is not only the “First” and “Preeminent” with respect to His eternal nature (“...even from everlasting to everlasting, thou [art] God” according to Psalm 90:2), but also from the standpoint of time - in fact before time - since time as we know began with the advent of Creation, when God said “let there be light,” and He separated the “light” from the “darkness” which we understand spiritually has to do with the essence of the Gospel; later on in Creation week, God attached both the “light” as well as the “darkness” to the celestial timekeepers, by which mankind has been subject to ever since. 


Let me give you a little outline of where we need to go from here in our study:


#1: I would now like to go back to Acts 13:33-35 to take a closer look at the unusual statement in verse 34 “...now no more to return to corruption…, ” after which we will consider the two sets of identical terms, “I will give” (didomi:G1325) and “Thou shalt not suffer” (didomi:G1325) as well as “mercies” (hosios:G3741) and “Holy One” (hosios:G3741); I’ll quote those verses again: “God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. {34} And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, [now] no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give [didomi:G1325]  you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741]  of David. {35} Wherefore he saith also in another [psalm], Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741]  to see corruption.”


# 2: Following that we will complete the word bridge  that we began in Part 7 between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:7b, centering on the Hebrew word, “have I begotten” (yalad:H3205), because we only had enough time to investigate the equivalent Greek word, “have I begotten” in Acts 13:33. Well I hope I have not made things too complicated for you.


Now No More [meketi:G3371] To [mello:G3195] Return [hypostrepho:G5290] To [eis:G1519] Corruption [diaphthora:G1312]


As stated, we will begin with with this enigmatic phrase in Acts 13:34, “...now no more to return to corruption;” the five Greek words in this citation are only found together here, so we will have to consider the main words individually - “now no more,” “return,” and “corruption.”


Now No More [meketi:G3371] 


The usage of the expression “now no more” represents an absolute, as the subsequent six passages illustrate:


In Mark 9:25 we witness the healing of the boy with a “deaf and dumb” spirit - a spiritual representation of what occurs in salvation during that wonderful “time and season”: “When Jesus saw that the people came running together, he rebuked the foul spirit, saying unto him, [Thou] dumb and deaf spirit, I charge thee, come out of him, and enter no more [meketi:G3371] into him.”


Then in Mark 11:14, the Lord curses the “fig tree” (that represents national Israel), and by so doing, highlights the end of God’s usage of corporate Israel as the Kingdom of God on earth; this word is here rendered as “hereafter”: “And Jesus answered and said unto it, No man eat fruit of thee hereafter [meketi:G3371] for ever. And his disciples heard [it].”


On the other hand, Romans 6:6 acknowledges that the child of God, once saved, will no longer serve sin in their soul, when salvation had taken place; it is translated as “henceforth not”:“Knowing this, that our old man is crucified with [him], that the body of sin might be destroyed, that henceforth [meketi:G3371][G0] we should not [meketi:G3371] serve sin.:


This same truth is also expressed in 2 Corinthians 5:15, in which this term is once again rendered as “ not henceforth”: “And [that] he died for all, that they which live should not henceforth [meketi:G3371] live unto themselves, but unto him which died for them, and rose again.”


1 Peter 4:2 substantiates this as well, in which this is translated as “no longer”: “That he no longer [meketi:G3371] should live the rest of [his] time in the flesh to the lusts of men, but to the will of God.”


One other passage to consider is Ephesians 4:14, and again this is rendered as “no more”: “That we [henceforth] be no more [meketi:G3371] children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, [and] cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive;” By the way, the identical word also appears in verses 17 and 28 of Ephesians 4, as “henceforth not” and “no more,” respectively. 


Return [hypostrepho:G5290] 


This particular word, “return,” is predominantly used the way we might use the term today, as these next passages demonstrate; this is not to suggest that it is only to be understood physically, because we recognize that each “God-breathed” word in the Bible has hidden spiritual ramifications:


Luke 17:15-18 concerns the response of one of the ten lepers who were healed in which this term surfaces in verse 15 and 18, as “turned back” and “that returned” in that order: “And one of them, when he saw that he was healed, turned back, [hypostrepho:G5290] and with a loud voice glorified God, {16} And fell down on [his] face at his feet, giving him thanks: and he was a Samaritan. {17} And Jesus answering said, Were there not ten cleansed? but where [are] the nine? {18} There are not found that returned [hypostrepho:G5290] to give glory to God, save this stranger.”


On the other hand, the One “returning” in the parable of the Nobleman in Luke 19:12 is the Lord Himself: “He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return.” [hypostrepho:G5290]


Acts 14:21 record one leg of  Paul and Barnabas’ missionary journeys: “And when they had preached the gospel to that city, and had taught many, they returned again [hypostrepho:G5290] to Lystra, and [to] Iconium, and Antioch,”


Galatians 1:17 also employs this word: “Neither went I up to Jerusalem to them which were apostles before me; but I went into Arabia, and returned [hypostrepho:G5290] again unto Damascus.”


When one takes into account this word, “return,” it is strengthened greatly by its modifier, “now no more” in this profound declaration in Acts 13:44, “...now no more to return to corruption.”


I think we’ll stop here for today, and in our next study, Lord willing, we will concentrate on this term, “corruption,” (diaphthora:G1312) and then finish up with Acts 13:34-35, after which we will address the Hebrew word for “have I begotten” (yalad:H3205) in Psalm 2:7b in our word bridge between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:7b.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 10

March 10, 2019


Today’s date is March 10, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 10. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether these things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have discovered a number of word study paths that all lead to the inescapable fact that Christ is indeed “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” By comparing “spiritual with spiritual,” we have arrived at the following conclusions so far: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world.”


I mentioned at the close of our previous study (#9) that today we would, among other things, look at the Greek word “corruption,” (diaphthora:G1312), but I forgot that we actually covered this already in Part 6. Instead let’s examine the two sets of words in Acts 13:34-35, “Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see corruption” which is in the negative in verse 35, whereas the same two words are denoted positively in verse 34: I will give [didomi:G1325] you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David.” I’ll read verses 22-23 and 32-37 for the sake of the context:


“And when he [God] had removed him [king Saul], he raised up unto them David to be their king; to whom also he gave testimony, and said, I have found David the [son] of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will. {23} Of this man's seed hath God according to [his] promise raised unto Israel a Saviour, Jesus: ... {32} And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, {33} God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up [anistemi:G450] Jesus again [anistemi:G450]; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten [gennao:G1060] thee. {34} And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, [now] no more to return to corruption [diaphthora”G1312], he said on this wise, I will give [didomi:G1325] you the sure mercies [hosios:G3741] of David. {35} Wherefore he saith also in another [psalm], Thou shalt not suffer [didomi:G1325] thine Holy One [hosios:G3741] to see corruption. [diaphthora:G1312] {36} For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption: {37} But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption.”


In this portion of Scripture we witness an interplay between the resurrection in 33 AD and that which occurred “...at the foundation of the world,” and we also see a secondary interplay between David and the Lord Jesus Christ, in which some might insist that this not speaking of Christ being “raised again” “...at the foundation of the world,” but rather that Christ took on a human nature as a descendant of David, and in his very lineage because of the word, taken from Psalm 2:7, “begotten” (gennao:G1080), even though the term, “in that he hath raised again” (anistemi:G450) is speaking of resurrection. A good illustration of this kind of misunderstanding is found in verse 8 of Luke 9:7-9, in which this word, “in that he hath raised again” (anistemi:G450) is rendered “was risen again”: 


“Now Herod the tetrarch heard of all that was done by him: and he was perplexed, because that it was said of some, that John was risen from the dead; {8} And of some, that Elias had appeared; and of others, that one of the old prophets had risen again. [anistemi:G450] {9} And Herod said, John have I beheaded: but who is this, of whom I hear such things? And he desired to see him.”   


However, it is crucial to bear in mind that God had to “seal up” this doctrine (and a number of others) until our day, in accordance with God’s methodology, as outlined in Proverbs 25:2 and elsewhere:


“[It is] the glory of God to conceal a thing: [dabar:H1697 - chiefly translated as “word”] but the honour of kings [is] to search out a matter.” [dabar:H1697 - chiefly translated as “word”]    


  • Verses 32-33 are dealing with the resurrection in 33 AD up to the phrase taken from Psalm 2:7 b, “Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee.” 


  • This quotation of Psalm 2:7b in verse 33 is referring to the resurrection, “...from the foundation of the world.” 


  • But in verse 34, the resurrection in 33 AD is once again in view, since it says, “...[now] no more to return to corruption.Christ’s body did not “corrupt” or experience decay because He was not bearing sin in 33 AD. He did not “return” or “go back” to corruption, implying that He already had already done so, which is why verse 35 affirms (quoting Psalm 16:10): “Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One  to see corruption.” 


  • However, in the latter part of  verse 34 we discover the somewhat puzzling  proclamation by the Father to the Son: “...I will give you the sure [pistos:G4103 - or “faithful”] mercies [hosios:G3741 - or “Holy One”] of David.” [Dabid:G1138 - from Dabid:H1732]. David, whose name signifies “the beloved,” is one of the greatest representatives of God’s Beloved Son, the Lord Jesus Christ - Who is both the “Holy One,” as well as “Faithful” - as we will now see by taking a closer look at these two terms. 


  • Lastly, one notices the ongoing comparison throughout this chapter and in verses 36-37 between David who died and experienced corruption, whereas Christ died and did not experience corruption in the demonstration in 33 AD.


Let’s now investigate the two terms in verses 34-35, “mercies” or “Holy One,” and “sure” or “faithful;” I won’t develop the other two terms that are identically spelled, “I will give,” and “Thou shalt not suffer” (didomi:G1325), other than to mention that they underscore the fact that God is the One that is both “giving” as well as “suffering,” an Old English word for “allowing.”


“Mercies” Or “Holy One” [hosios:G3741]


Hebrews 7:26 teaches: “For such an high priest became us, [who is] holy, [hosios:G3741] harmless, undefiled, separate from sinners, and made higher than the heavens;”


And Revelation 15:4 acknowledges that God alone is holy: “Who shall not fear thee, O Lord, and glorify thy name? for [thou] only [art] holy: [hosios:G3741] for all nations shall come and worship before thee; for thy judgments are made manifest.”


Curiously this term is rendered as “shalt be” in Revelation 16:5 in this majestic declaration of God’s eternal existence: “And I heard the angel of the waters say, Thou art righteous, O Lord, which art, and wast, and shalt be, [hosios:G3741] because thou hast judged thus.”


“Sure” Or “Faithful” [pistos:G4103]


1 Corinthians 1:9 maintains, “God [is] faithful, [pistos:G4103] by whom ye were called unto the fellowship of his Son Jesus Christ our Lord.”


1 Thessalonians 5:24 adds: “Faithful [pistos:G4103] [is] he that calleth you, who also will do [it].”


Likewise 2 Thessalonians 3:3 reveals: “But the Lord is faithful, [pistos:G4103] who shall stablish you, and keep [you] from evil.”


Hebrews 2:17 declares: “Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like unto [his] brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful [pistos:G4103] high priest in things [pertaining] to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.”


Similarly, Hebrews 10:23 affirms: “Let us hold fast the profession of [our] faith without wavering; (for he [is] faithful [pistos:G4103] that promised;)”


Hebrews 11:11 also acknowledges: “Through faith also Sara herself received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age, because she judged him faithful [pistos:G4103] who had promised.”


Next we want to finish up the “word bridge” between Acts 13:33 and Psalm 2:6-7b by looking at the Hebrew term, “have I begotten” (yalad:H3205), as we only researched the Greek equivalent in an earlier lesson. I’ll quote those passages again: 


Acts 13:33 states: “God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten [gennao:H1080] thee.”


Psalm 2:6-7, “Yet have I set my king upon my holy hill of Zion. {7} I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son; this day have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


Have I Begotten [yalad:H3205] 


I would like to examine both verses 6 and 7 in some detail, but for now let’s keep our focus on this word, “have I begotten.” It is a term that is used primarily to denote “birth” by over 13 different English words, so it is indeed very pregnant with meaning, no pun intended. As such, it would lend credence to the notion as I stated earlier, of Christ taking on a human nature, as opposed to rising from the dead “...at the foundation of the world.” Here are some examples:


One of the questions we received last Sunday on Enoch is a good illustration of this expression in Genesis 4:17 and Genesis 5:18, in which it is rendered as “and bare” and “he begat” respectively: “And Cain knew his wife; and she conceived, and bare [yalad:H3205] Enoch: and he builded a city, and called the name of the city, after the name of his son, Enoch....{5:18} “And Jared lived an hundred sixty and two years, and he begat [yalad:H3205] Enoch:”


This expression is also utilized in both Isaiah 7:14 and Isaiah 9:6 with regards to the Incarnation: “Therefore the Lord himself shall give you a sign; Behold, a virgin shall conceive, and bear [yalad:H3205] a son, and shall call his name Immanuel…{9:6} For unto us a child is born, [yalad:H3205] unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.”


In verse 2 of Zephaniah 2:2-3 is translated as “bring forth” in this warning that God gives prior to the “day of judgment”: “Before the decree bring forth [yalad:H3205], [before] the day pass as the chaff, before the fierce anger of the LORD come upon you, before the day of the LORD'S anger come upon you. {3} Seek ye the LORD, all ye meek of the earth, which have wrought his judgment; seek righteousness, seek meekness: it may be ye shall be hid in the day of the LORD'S anger.”


In Isaiah 54:1, this word is rendered as “thou [that] didst not bear,” and is developed further in the parable found in Galatians 4 regrading Sarah and Hagar, and Isaac and Ishmael: Sing, O barren, thou [that] didst not bear; [yalad:H3205] break forth into singing, and cry aloud, thou [that] didst not travail with child: for more [are] the children of the desolate than the children of the married wife, saith the LORD.”


In Job 15:7 God poses this curious question to Job, Who typifies the Lord Jesus, in which the word, “art thou the first” is doubled: “[Art] thou the first [ri’shown:H7223/ri’shown:H7223] man [adam:H120] [that] was born? [yalad:H3205] or wast thou made before the hills?”


Lastly, Ecclesiastes 3:2 maintains: “A time to be born, [yalad:H3205] and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up [that which is] planted;”


A Closer Look At Psalm 2:6-7


As I mentioned, we want to now turn our attention to Psalm 2:6-7, as we are going to find some exceedingly important proofs that relate to Christ being “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.”


Yet have I set [nacak:H5258] my king upon my holy hill of Zion. {7} I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son; this day have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


Yet Have I Set [nacak:H5258]


The first Hebrew word, “Yet have I set” in Psalm 2:6 is most compelling. It is only translated this way and in one other reference - Proverbs 8:23 -  which we will also be examining in greater detail:


I was set up [nacak:H5258] from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was.”


In all of the other 23 occurrences of this word, it is always rendered as: pour out,” (12x), pour (4x), cover (3x), offer(2x), once as melteth,” and once as molten,” as the subsequent citations reveal:


Genesis 35:14 records: “And Jacob set up a pillar in the place where he talked with him, [even] a pillar of stone: and he poured [nacak:H5258] a drink offering thereon, and he poured oil thereon.”


And Numbers 28:7 offers this instruction: “And the drink offering thereof [shall be] the fourth [part] of an hin for the one lamb: in the holy [place] shalt thou cause the strong wine to be poured [nacak:H5258] unto the LORD [for] a drink offering.


In verse 16 of 2 Samuel 23:14-17 we learn what David did: “And David [was] then in an hold, and the garrison of the Philistines [was] then [in] Bethlehem. {15} And David longed, and said, Oh that one would give me drink of the water of the well of Bethlehem, which [is] by the gate! {16} And the three mighty men brake through the host of the Philistines, and drew water out of the well of Bethlehem, that [was] by the gate, and took [it], and brought [it] to David: nevertheless he would not drink thereof, but poured it out [nacak:H5258] unto the LORD. {17} And he said, Be it far from me, O LORD, that I should do this: [is not this] the blood of the men that went in jeopardy of their lives? therefore he would not drink it. These things did these three mighty men.”


Isaiah 29:10 relates this expression to spiritual blindness and death, and please note that it is God that is fostering this delusion as we also see in 2 Thessalonians 2:11, “For the LORD hath poured out [nacak:H5258] upon you the spirit of deep sleep, and hath closed your eyes: the prophets and your rulers, the seers hath he covered.”


Isaiah 30:1 highlights man’s futile attempts to cover his sin, without God’s righteousness:“Woe to the rebellious children, saith the LORD, that take counsel, but not of me; and that cover [nacak:H5258] with a covering, but not of my spirit, that they may add sin to sin:”


This term is also expressed as “melteth” in Isaiah 40:19 in the construction of a false idol: “The workman melteth [nacak:H5258] a graven image, and the goldsmith spreadeth it over with gold, and casteth silver chains.


Isaiah 44:10 similarly adds: “Who hath formed a god, or molten [nacak:H5258] a graven image [that] is profitable for nothing?”


Because of the preponderance of this term, “poured out,” “covered,” or “melteth”/ “molten,” we can safely conclude that this word should most definitely be rendered in this manner in both Psalm 2:6 and in Proverbs 8:23 accordingly:


Yet have I set poured out [nacak:H5258] my king upon my holy hill of Zion


I was set up poured out [nacak:H5258] from everlasting, from the beginning, or ever the earth was.”


Let’s stop here. Lord willing, we will continue examining Psalm 2:6-7 and Proverbs 8:23 in our next study.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 11

March 17, 2019


Today’s date is March 17, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 11. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have discovered a number of word study paths that all lead to the inescapable fact that Christ is indeed “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” So far in our study of comparing “spiritual with spiritual,” we have arrived at the following conclusions: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world,” since others were raised from the dead prior to the Crucifixion in 33 AD.
  4. Christ was indeed “poured out” or “offered up” or “melted” - terms that vividly portray annihilation - which He voluntarily subjected Himself to in the Atonement at the foundation of the world.


At the end of our last study we began an examination of Psalm 2:6-7, and I’ll read down to verse 9, since among other truths, these verses relate to reaching the last of the nations of the elect prior to May 21, 2011, along with what is taking place currently in this prolonged day of judgment:


Yet have I set [nacak:H5258] my king [melek:H4428] upon my holy [qodesh:H6944] hill [har:H20222] of Zion. [Tsiyown:H6726] {7} I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son; this day have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee. {8} Ask of me, and I shall give [thee] the heathen [for] thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth [for] thy possession. {9} Thou shalt break them with a rod of iron; thou shalt dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel.”


One of the most astounding truths that we discovered in our last study centered around the term, “Yet have I set” which should be translated as “Yet have I “poured out,” or “offered” or “melted,” since Christ gave up His life, and was annihilated in the Atonement, “...from the foundation of the world,” as we read in John 10:17-18,


“Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. {18} No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.”


My King [melek:H4428]


The expression, “my king” in Psalm 2:6 is of course speaking of the Lord Jesus, as we read in Zechariah 14:5, 9, and 16-17, 


“And ye shall flee [to] the valley of the mountains; for the valley of the mountains shall reach unto Azal: yea, ye shall flee, like as ye fled from before the earthquake in the days of Uzziah king [melek:H4428] of Judah: and the LORD my God shall come, [and] all the saints with thee. ... {9} And the LORD shall be king [melek:H4428] over all the earth: in that day shall there be one LORD, and his name one. ... {16} And it shall come to pass, [that] every one that is left of all the nations which came against Jerusalem shall even go up from year to year to worship the King, [melek:H4428] the LORD of hosts, and to keep the feast of tabernacles. {17} And it shall be, [that] whoso will not come up of [all] the families of the earth unto Jerusalem to worship the King, [melek:H4428] the LORD of hosts, even upon them shall be no rain.”


Upon My Holy [qodesh:H6944] Hill [har:H20222] Of Zion [Tsiyown:H6726] 


The last phrase in Psalm 2:6 is comprised of three words: “...upon my holy [qodesh:H6944] hill [har:H20222] of Zion.” [Tsiyown:H6726] These three terms appear together in the following four citations, and refer to God’s Holy Kingdom, as “mountains”  spiritually represent “kingdoms” in the Bible; “Zion” can refer to Jerusalem, and we are to understand that as “Jerusalem...above” in this context, according to Galatians 4:26 or the “New Jerusalem” in Revelation 21:2 respectively:


“But Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all.”


“And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.”


Joel 2:1 records the warning that God’s saints proclaimed leading up to the start of Judgment Day on May 21, 2011: “Blow ye the trumpet in Zion, [Tsiyown:H6726] and sound an alarm in my holy [qodesh:H6944]  mountain: [har:H20222] let all the inhabitants of the land tremble: for the day of the LORD cometh, for [it is] nigh at hand;”


Joel 3:17 also declares: “So shall ye know that I [am] the LORD your God dwelling in Zion, [Tsiyown:H6726] my holy [qodesh:H6944] mountain: [har:H20222] then shall Jerusalem be holy [qodesh:H6944], and there shall no strangers pass through her any more.”


Obadiah 1:17 likewise adds, “But upon mount [har:H20222] Zion [Tsiyown:H6726] shall be deliverance, and there shall be holiness; [qodesh:H6944]  and the house of Jacob shall possess their possessions.”


And Zechariah 8:3 maintains: “Thus saith the LORD; I am returned unto Zion, [Tsiyown:H6726] and will dwell in the midst of Jerusalem: and Jerusalem shall be called a city of truth; and the mountain [har:H20222] of the LORD of hosts the holy [qodesh:H6944]  mountain.” [har:H20222]

 

Psalm 2:7


Let us now turn our attention to Psalm 2:7 which states: “I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son; this day have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


The last term in this verse, “have I begotten thee” (yalad:H3205) was already discussed to some extent  in Part 10, as quite often it refers to physical birth. However we have to bear in mind that Christ is the “firstborn from the dead” or “first begotten from the dead” as we discovered in Colossians 1:18 Revelation 1:5 respectively:


“And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all [things] he might have the preeminence.”


“And from Jesus Christ, [who is] the faithful witness, [and] the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood,”


These references also complement what we found in Job 15:7 in Part 10, in which God poses this rhetorical question to Job (who typifies the Lord Jesus): 


“[Art] thou the first man [that] was born? [yalad:H3205] or wast thou made [chuwl:H2342] before the hills?” 


What is He really asking? ARE YOU THE FIRSTBORN? The answer is a resounding yes! You might be wondering about the word, “or wast thou made” (chuwl:H2342), which I do want to develop, but I will wait until we get to Proverbs 8, where it is prominently featured in verses 24-25. Alright, let’s go back to Psalm 2:7, and the first two words…


I Will Declare [caphar:H5608] The Decree [choq:H2706]


One finds these two terms together in three other citations, besides here in Psalm 2:7,

In Ezra 7:11 the word, “I will declare” is rendered twice as “scribe,” and the decree as “statutes”: “Now this [is] the copy of the letter that the king Artaxerxes gave unto Ezra the priest, the scribe, [caphar:H5608] [even] a scribe [caphar:H5608] of the words of the commandments of the LORD, and of his statutes [choq:H2706] to Israel.”


Then in Psalm 50:16 these two expressions are translated as “declare” and “statutes” accordingly: “But unto the wicked God saith, What hast thou to do to declare [caphar:H5608] my statutes [choq:H2706], or [that] thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth?”


Similarly Psalm 119:26 renders them in the same manner: “I have declared [caphar:H5608]  my ways, and thou heardest me: teach me thy statutes.” [choq:H2706]


So as we think about the implications of these two words - both of which point to the Word of God - God is preparing to make one of the most solemn pronouncements in all of Scripture…but before He does that He inserts two other expressions that further underscore the Word of God for even greater emphasis...


The LORD [Yehovah:H3068] Hath Said [’amar:H559] Unto Me


These two words are found together over 4200 times in the Old Testament, as these next passages reveal - one from Genesis 2:16 and the other from Malachi 4:1,


And the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] God commanded the man, saying [’amar:H559], Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat:”


“For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn as an oven; and all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, shall be stubble: and the day that cometh shall burn them up, saith [’amar:H559] the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] of hosts, that it shall leave them neither root nor branch.”


The declaration, “THOU ART MY SON” is both awe-inspiring and fearful, as we contemplate the monumental significance of Christ’s death and annihilation - the payment required for all the sins of each of the elect - at the foundation of the world, and His subsequent resurrection, as was noted earlier today in John 10:17-18, but certainly bears repeating:


“Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. {18} No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.”

Thou Art My Son [ben:H1121]


We have already discussed some of the passages that contain this declaration, “Thou art my son,” but let’s review them again and please note the strong connection with the Greek word, “begotten” (gennao:G1080), which we considered in some of our earlier studies, and corresponds to the Hebrew, “begotten” (yalad:H3205), found in Psalm 2:7.


Acts 13:33 records, “God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou [sy:G4771] art [ei:G1488] my [mou:G3450] Son [huios:G5207], this day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee.”


Hebrews 1:5, “For unto which of the angels said he at any time, Thou [sy:G4771] art [ei:G1488] my [mou:G3450] Son [huios:G5207], this day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee? And again, I will be to him a Father, and he shall be to me a Son?”


Hebrews 5:5, “So also Christ glorified not himself to be made an high priest; but he that said unto him, Thou [sy:G4771] art [ei:G1488] my [mou:G3450] Son [mou:G3450], to day have I begotten [gennao:G1080] thee.”


These next citations do not contain the term, “begotten,” but they do include the expression, “beloved” (agapetos:G27), “dearly beloved” or “well beloved.” 


And do you remember why He is the “beloved”? John 10:17 tells us: Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it againDeath and Resurrection.




Mark 1:11, “And there came a voice from heaven, [saying], Thou art my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.”


Luke 3:22, “And the Holy Ghost descended in a bodily shape like a dove upon him, and a voice came from heaven, which said, Thou art my beloved Son; in thee I am well pleased.”


This Day [yowm:H3117]


The last word that we want to investigate in Psalm 2:7 is “this day” (yowm:H3117); it is the most common word for “day” in the Old Testament, utilized over 2000 times. And without a doubt, the Lord Jesus is that monolithic “Day,” as we will presently see, and we know that this is referring to Him being the Firstborn or Firstbegotten, “from the dead.” However, this is occurring prior to Creation, when there was no “day” or “night” or time in general, as they had not been created yet. He is that everlasting “Day” or “Daystar” that we read about, for example, in 2 Peter 1:9, in which the first rays of Light pierce through the darkness of sin, as evidenced in Creation, because Christ Who is that Light, had just conquered sin and annihilation, and rose in everlasting victory in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world”:


“We have also a more sure word of prophecy; whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day [hemera:G2250] dawn [diaugazo:G1306], and the day star arise in your hearts:” 


In Psalm 110:3 and 5 this word, “in the day” appears in a timeline that stretches all the way prior to Creation to our current day of judgment: “Thy people [shall be] willing in the day [yowm:H3117] of thy power, in the beauties of holiness from the womb of the morning: thou hast the dew of thy youth. ... {5} The Lord at thy right hand shall strike through kings in the day [yowm:H3117] of his wrath.”



Psalm 118:24 also maintains: “This [is] the day [yowm:H3117] [which] the LORD hath made; we will rejoice and be glad in it.”


In Psalm 139:15-16 one gleans from this historical parable the spiritual formation of the Body of Christ, comprised of all the elect, in which the term “day” is rendered, “[which] in continuance”: “My substance was not hid from thee, when I was made in secret, [and] curiously wrought in the lowest parts of the earth. {16} Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; and in thy book all [my members] were written, [which] in continuance [yowm:H3117] were fashioned, when [as yet there was] none of them.”


In Genesis 25:31, God links the “day” with the “birthright” (pointing to Christ) of the firstborn: “And Jacob said, Sell me this day [yowm:H3117]  thy birthright.” [bekowrah:H1062]


Similarly, in Numbers 3:13, God makes another association between “the day” and “the firstborn,” in which “the firstborn” surfaces three times in this passage: Because all the firstborn [bekowr:H1060] [are] mine; [for] on the day [yowm:H3117] that I smote all the firstborn [bekowr:H1060] in the land of Egypt I hallowed unto me all the firstborn [bekowr:H1060] in Israel, both man and beast: mine shall they be: I [am] the LORD.”


Incidentally, the expressions, “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), “firstfruits” (bikkuwr:H1061), and  “birthright” (bekowrah:H1062), all stem from another root word, which is translated as either “firstborn,” “firstling,” “new fruit,” or “first child” (bakar:H1069) which we will also be investigating in our future studies. Lord willing. So let’s stop here for today.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 12

March 24, 2019


Today’s date is March 24, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 12. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have discovered a number of word study paths that all lead to the inescapable fact that Christ is indeed “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” So far in our study of comparing “spiritual with spiritual,” we have arrived at the following conclusions: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world,” since others were raised from the dead prior to the Crucifixion in 33 AD.
  4. Christ was indeed “poured out” or “offered up” or “melted” - terms that vividly portray annihilation - which He voluntarily subjected Himself to in the Atonement at the foundation of the world.




We also have correctly noted that Christ received the title, “Son of God,” when He rose from death and annihilation, according to Romans 1:4; I’ll read verses 1-4,


“Paul, a servant of Jesus Christ, called [to be] an apostle, separated unto the gospel of God, {2} (Which he had promised afore by his prophets in the holy scriptures,) {3} Concerning his Son Jesus Christ our Lord, which was made of the seed of David according to the flesh; {4} And declared [horizo:G3724] [to be] the Son [huios:G5207] of God [theos:G2316] with [en:G1722] power [dynamis:G1411], according [kata:G2596] to the spirit [pneuma:G4151] of holiness [hagiosyne:G42], by [ek:G1537] the resurrection [anastasis:G386] from the dead:” [nekros:G3498]


A Closer Look At Romans 1:4


It might be a good idea to take a closer look at Romans 1:4, as this is such a key verse; after which we can examine the Hebrew expressions, “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), “firstfruits” (bikkuwr:H1061), and “birthright” (bekowrah:H1062), which all stem from a root word, which is translated as either “firstborn,” “firstling,” “new fruit,” or “first child” (bakar:H1069), as I mentioned at the close of Part 11. 


And Declared [horizo:G3724]


Let’s first consider the Greek term, “and declared” in Romans 1:4. By contrast, you might recall from Part 11 that we looked at the Hebrew word, “I will declare” which appears in Psalm 2:7, which we investigated in some detail, and which states: 


I will declare [caphar:H5608] the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou [art] my Son; this day have I begotten [yalad:H3205] thee.”


Please note that both Psalm 2:7 and Romans 1:4 speak about Christ’s “...resurrection from the dead,” and as the [“first] begotten [from the dead].” Let’s keep that at the forefront of our minds as we probe into this Greek word, “and declared.” 


This Greek expression, “and declared” (horizo:G3724) in Romans 1:4 crops up in the following 7 citations, besides here in Romans 1:4; it is translated as “determine,” “ordain,” “declare,” and once as “limit”:


In verse 22 of Luke 22:21-22 the Savior makes this statement with regard to Judas, in which this word is rendered as “it was determined”: “But, behold, the hand of him that betrayeth me [is] with me on the table. {22} And truly the Son of man goeth, as it was determined: [horizo:G3724] but woe unto that man by whom he is betrayed!”


In verse 23 of Acts 2:22-36, this term is translated as “by the determinate”: “Ye men of Israel, hear these words; Jesus of Nazareth, a man approved of God among you by miracles and wonders and signs, which God did by him in the midst of you, as ye yourselves also know:{23} Him, being delivered by the determinate [horizo:G3724] counsel and foreknowledge of God, ye have taken, and by wicked hands have crucified and slain: {24} Whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death: because it was not possible that he should be holden of it. {25} For David speaketh concerning him, I foresaw the Lord always before my face, for he is on my right hand, that I should not be moved: {26} Therefore did my heart rejoice, and my tongue was glad; moreover also my flesh shall rest in hope: {27} Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. {28} Thou hast made known to me the ways of life; thou shalt make me full of joy with thy countenance. {29} Men [and] brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulchre is with us unto this day. {30} Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him, that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, he would raise up Christ to sit on his throne; {31} He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption. {32} This Jesus hath God raised up, whereof we all are witnesses. {33} Therefore being by the right hand of God exalted, and having received of the Father the promise of the Holy Ghost, he hath shed forth this, which ye now see and hear. {34} For David is not ascended into the heavens: but he saith himself, The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, {35} Until I make thy foes thy footstool. {36} Therefore let all the house of Israel know assuredly, that God hath made that same Jesus, whom ye have crucified, both Lord and Christ.”


Verse 42 of Acts 10:42-43 expresses this word as “was ordained”: “And he commanded us to preach unto the people, and to testify that it is he which was ordained [horizo:G3724]  of God [to be] the Judge of quick [i.e., “the living”] and dead. {43} To him give all the prophets witness, that through his name whosoever believeth in him shall receive remission of sins.”


In verse 29 of Acts 11:27-30 it appears again as “determined”: “And in these days came prophets from Jerusalem unto Antioch. {28} And there stood up one of them named Agabus, and signified by the Spirit that there should be great dearth throughout all the world: which came to pass in the days of Claudius Caesar. {29} Then the disciples, every man according to his ability, determined [horizo:G3724] to send relief unto the brethren which dwelt in Judaea: {30} Which also they did, and sent it to the elders by the hands of Barnabas and Saul.”


In verses 26 and 31 of Acts 17:22-34, these words surface as “and hath determined,” and “he hath ordained,” respectively: “Then Paul stood in the midst of Mars' hill, and said, [Ye] men of Athens, I perceive that in all things ye are too superstitious. {23} For as I passed by, and beheld your devotions, I found an altar with this inscription, TO THE UNKNOWN GOD. Whom therefore ye ignorantly worship, him declare I unto you. {24} God that made the world and all things therein, seeing that he is Lord of heaven and earth, dwelleth not in temples made with hands; {25} Neither is worshipped with men's hands, as though he needed any thing, seeing he giveth to all life, and breath, and all things; {26} And hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined [horizo:G3724] the times before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation; {27} That they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him, and find him, though he be not far from every one of us: {28} For in him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring. {29} Forasmuch then as we are the offspring of God, we ought not to think that the Godhead is like unto gold, or silver, or stone, graven by art and man's device. {30} And the times of this ignorance God winked at; but now commandeth all men every where to repent: {31} Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by [that] man whom he hath ordained; [whereof] he hath given assurance unto all [men], in that he hath raised him from the dead. {32} And when they heard of the resurrection of the dead, some mocked: and others said, We will hear thee again of this [matter]. {33} So Paul departed from among them. {34} Howbeit certain men clave unto him, and believed: among the which [was] Dionysius the Areopagite, and a woman named Damaris, and others with them.”


Lastly, in verse 7 of Hebrews 4:1-11, this term is found as “he limiteth”: “Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left [us] of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it. {2} For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them: but the word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard [it]. {3} For we which have believed do enter into rest, as he said, As I have sworn in my wrath, if they shall enter into my rest: although the works were finished from the foundation of the world. {4} For he spake in a certain place of the seventh [day] on this wise, And God did rest the seventh day from all his works. {5} And in this [place] again, If they shall enter into my rest. {6}  Seeing therefore it remaineth that some must enter therein, and they to whom it was first preached entered not in because of unbelief: {7} Again, he limiteth [horizo:G3724] a certain day, saying in David, To day, after so long a time; as it is said, To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts. {8} For if Jesus had given them rest, then would he not afterward have spoken of another day. {9} There remaineth therefore a rest to the people of God. {10} For he that is entered into his rest, he also hath ceased from his own works, as God [did] from his. {11} Let us labour therefore to enter into that rest, lest any man fall after the same example of unbelief.”


In the foregoing verses we see how God employs this expression in a very precise way to highlight:


  1. Christ’s resurrection “...from the foundation of the world” in Romans 1:4
  2. Christ’s betrayal by Judas leading up to His crucifixion, which was a “tableau” of the Atonement that took place, “...from the foundation of the world” in Luke 22:22
  3. Christ being delivered up to death by God’s “...determinate counsel and foreknowledge….” according to Acts 2:23 in the “demonstration” of 33 AD.
  4. The brethren (in Asia Minor) who “determined” to send “relief” (signifying “service” or “ministry”) to their brethren in Judea, upon hearing about an upcoming “famine” in Acts 11:29 (apparently during the reign of Claudius Caesar: 41-54 AD) - a reminder of the “spiritual famine” found in Amos 8:11-12
  5. The predetermined “times” and “seasons” (i.e., “bounds”) of mankind upon earth in Acts 17:26.
  6. The selection of the [beginning of] “day” of judgment, (May 21, 2011),  in which Christ is judging the world in righteousness, having given “assurance” [(i.e., “faith”“pistis” (G4102)] to “all” - referring to all the nations of elect, prior to May 21, 2011 - by raising Him from the dead “...at the foundation of the world.”
  7. The “day of salvation” which lasted 13,203 years in Hebrews 4:7 in the context of  “...the works were finished from the foundation of the world.”  


The next two words, “the Son” and “of God” make up this title that was given to the Lord Jesus, according to Romans 1:4, which we are investigating:


And declared [horizo:G3724] [to be] the Son [huios:G5207] of God [theos:G2316] with [en:G1722] power [dynamis:G1411], according [kata:G2596] to the spirit [pneuma:G4151] of holiness [hagiosyne:G42], by [ek:G1537] the resurrection [anastasis:G386] from the dead:” [nekros:G3498]


[To Be] The Son [huios:G5207] Of God [theos:G2316]


This title is only seen in the New Testament, with the unique exception of one very significant Old Testament passage that we discover in verse 25 of  Daniel 3:24-25, which relates spiritually to the Great Tribulation, in which Nebuchadnezzar (who typifies Satan) makes the following proclamation, under divine inspiration to indicate that Christ was already - by virtue of His “resurrection from the dead” at the foundation of the world - the glorious “Son of God”:


“Then Nebuchadnezzar the king was astonied, and rose up in haste, [and] spake, and said unto his counsellors, Did not we cast three men bound into the midst of the fire? They answered and said unto the king, True, O king. {25} He answered and said, Lo, I see four men loose, walking in the midst of the fire, and they have no hurt; and the form of the fourth is like the Son [bar:G1247, Aramaic - corresponding to the Hebrew, “ben” (H1121)] of God.”[’elahh:H426, Aramaic - corresponding to the Hebrew, ’elowahh” (H433)]


Christ already possessed the title of “Son of God,” prior to His crucifixion in 33 AD, as the following passages indicate, so that title could not have been conferred upon Him when He rose from the dead on that first Resurrection Sunday according to Romans 1:4, but rather “...at the foundation of the world”:


Matthew 26:63-64 records, “But Jesus held his peace. And the high priest answered and said unto him, I adjure thee by the living God, that thou tell us whether thou be the Christ, the Son [huios:G5207] of God.” [theos:G2316]


Luke 1:35 also reveals that the title “Son of God” was given prior to His Divine Conception: “And the angel answered and said unto her, The Holy Ghost shall come upon thee, and the power of the Highest shall overshadow thee: therefore also that holy thing which shall be born of thee shall be called the Son [huios:G5207]  of God.” [theos:G2316]


John 10:36 declares: “Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son [huios:G5207]   of God?” [theos:G2316]


And John 19:7 adds: “The Jews answered him, We have a law, and by our law he ought to die, because he made himself the Son [huios:G5207] of God.” [theos:G2316]


Galatians 2:20 is one of 13 or so passages in both the Old and New Testaments that contain the possessive form regarding the “faith of Christ”: “I am crucified with Christ: nevertheless I live; yet not I, but Christ liveth in me: and the life which I now live in the flesh I live by the faith of the Son [huios:G5207] of God [theos:G2316], who loved me, and gave himself for me.”


And at what point did God “love” the Apostle Paul (or each of the other elect), and “gave himself” for them? This was accomplished “...at the foundation of the world.”


Hebrews 7:3 provides a description of Melchisedec - Who is Christ - as the elect’s High Priest: “Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son [huios:G5207] of God [theos:G2316]; abideth a priest continually.”


With [en:G1722] Power [dynamis:G1411]


Let’s now consider the two terms, “with power” which highlight the eternal power that the Godhead possesses, which our feeble minds can only begin to appreciate because it is infinitely beyond our ability to comprehend, as the subsequent references affirm:


1 Corinthians 4:20 asserts: “For the kingdom of God [is] not in word, but in [en:G1722]  power.” [dynamis:G1411]


Speaking expressly of the resurrection 1 Corinthians 15:43 announces: “It is sown in dishonour; it is raised in glory: it is sown in weakness; it is raised in [en:G1722]  power:” [dynamis:G1411]


1 Thessalonians 1:5 also corroborates this: “For our gospel came not unto you in word only, but also in [en:G1722] power, [dynamis:G1411] and in the Holy Ghost, and in much assurance; as ye know what manner of men we were among you for your sake.”


All Three Persons Of The Godhead Collaborated In The Resurrection


I also want to emphasize another prominent aspect of the resurrection “...at the foundation of the world,” which is that all three Persons of the Godhead are pinpointed as having raised Christ from the dead individually, keeping in mind the mystery that they always complement and glorify One another in perfect harmony:


Acts 17:31 illustrates the Father’s role: “Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by [that] man whom he hath ordained; [whereof] he hath given assurance unto all [men], in that he hath raised him from the dead.” 


John 10:18 underscores the role of the Son: “No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.”


And in 1 Peter 3:18 we learn about the Holy Spirit’s participation: “For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that he might bring us to God, being put to death in the flesh, but quickened [“made alive”] by the Spirit:” 


To The Spirit [pneuma:G4151] 


There is also a unique passage found in 1 Peter 1:2 that includes the role of all three Persons of the Godhead in saving God’s elect, during the day of salvation, which contains the next word in Romans 1:4, “to the Spirit”: 


“Elect according to the foreknowledge of God the Father, through sanctification of the Spirit, [pneuma:G4151] unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ: Grace unto you, and peace, be multiplied.”


Of Holiness [hagiosyne:G42]


The next expression, “of holiness” only surfaces in two other citations, both of which render this word as “holiness” as well:


2 Corinthians 7:1 asserts: “Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness [hagiosyne:G42] in the fear of God.”


In similar fashion, 1 Thessalonians 3:13 concludes: “To the end he may stablish your hearts unblameable in holiness [hagiosyne:G42] before God, even our Father, at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his saints.”


The Resurrection [anastasis:G386] From The Dead: [nekros:G3498]


The last two words in Romans 1:4 are “the resurrection” and “from the dead,” which of course underscores that Christ is indeed “the firstborn from the dead,” or “the first begotten of the dead,” as we have discussed repeatedly. Here are some illustrations of how God utilizes these two terms:


1 Corinthians 15:12-13, 21, and 42 offer this argument: “Now if Christ be preached that he rose from the dead,  [nekros:G3498] how say some among you that there is no resurrection [anastasis:G386] of the dead?  [nekros:G3498] {13} But if there be no resurrection [anastasis:G386] of the dead,  [nekros:G3498] then is Christ not risen: ... {21} For since by man [came] death, by man [came] also the resurrection [anastasis:G386] of the dead.  [nekros:G3498]... {42} So also [is] the resurrection [anastasis:G386] of the dead.  [nekros:G3498] It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption:”


In similar fashion, 1 Peter 1:3 acknowledges: “Blessed [be] the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, which according to his abundant mercy hath begotten us again unto a lively hope by the resurrection [anastasis:G386] of Jesus Christ from the dead,”  [nekros:G3498]


Let’s stop here, and Lord willing, continue our research into this wonderful doctrine in our next study.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 13

March 31, 2019


Today’s date is March 31, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 13. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have discovered a number of word study paths that all lead to the inescapable fact that Christ is indeed “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” So far in our study of comparing “spiritual with spiritual,” we have arrived at the following conclusions: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world,” since others were raised from the dead prior to the Crucifixion in 33 AD.
  4. Christ was indeed “poured out” or “offered up” or “melted” - terms that vividly portray annihilation - which He voluntarily subjected Himself to in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world.”
  5. When Christ rose from death and annihilation “...from the foundation of the world,” He received the title, “Son of God.”


In our last study, I mentioned that today we would consider the Hebrew expressions, “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), “firstfruits” (bikkuwr:H1061), and  “birthright” (bekowrah:H1062), all of which stem from the root word, “bakar” (H1069), which is translated as either “firstborn,” “firstling,” “new fruit,” or “first child.”  We are doing this, praying that God might give us further insight into this wonderful doctrine that God has revealed, regarding the Atonement which the Lord Jesus Christ performed as the “...Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.”


Bakar [H1069]


Let’s first consider the root word, “bakar,” (H1069) from which the three terms “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), “firstfruits” (bikkuwr:H1061), and “birthright” (bekowrah:H1062) are derived from; it is only found in the following four passages:


In Leviticus 27:26, we learn that the “firstling” which is how this term is rendered here, belongs to Jehovah, and was not to be offered to the LORD, by man: “Only the firstling [bakar:H1069] of the beasts, which should be the LORD'S firstling, no man shall sanctify it; whether [it be] ox, or sheep: it [is] the LORD'S.”


This principle was to be carried out with regard to human beings in Deuteronomy 21:16, in the case of a man that had two wives, reminiscent of Jacob and both Leah and Rachel: “Then it shall be, when he maketh his sons to inherit [that] which he hath, [that] he may not make the son of the beloved firstborn [bakar:H1069] before the son of the hated, [which is indeed] the firstborn:” [bekowr:H1060]


Please note the second term, “[which is indeed] the firstborn,” (bekowr:H1060) is one of the derivatives of this word.



Jeremiah 4:31 renders this word, “as of her that bringeth forth her first child”: “For I have heard a voice as of a woman in travail, [and] the anguish as of her that bringeth forth her first child [bakar:H1069], the voice of the daughter of Zion, [that] bewaileth herself, [that] spreadeth her hands, [saying], Woe [is] me now! for my soul is wearied because of murderers.”


And Ezekiel 47:12 declares: “And by the river upon the bank thereof, on this side and on that side, shall grow all trees for meat, whose leaf shall not fade, neither shall the fruit thereof be consumed: it shall bring forth new fruit [bakar:H1069] according to his months, because their waters they issued out of the sanctuary: and the fruit thereof shall be for meat, and the leaf thereof for medicine.”


This word, “bakar” (H1069) as you can see is primarily translated as “firstling,” “firstborn,” and “first child,” except here in Ezekiel 47:12, in which it is rendered as “new fruit.” However, God very definitely connects the idea of “childbirth” with “fruit” in a number of passages in both the Old and New Testaments, such as Deuteronomy 7:13 and Luke 1:42, respectively, even though a different word for “fruit” is utilized:  


“And he will love thee, and bless thee, and multiply thee: he will also bless the fruit [periy:H6529] of thy womb [beten:H990], and the fruit [periy:H6529] of thy land, thy corn, and thy wine, and thine oil, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep, in the land which he sware unto thy fathers to give thee.”


Incidentally, the term, “of thy womb” is “beten” (H990) and it is rendered  almost equally as “belly” or “womb.” And in verse 2 of Jonah 2:1-2, which we still need to re-visit, it appears as “the belly of hell” (or the grave) referring to the Lord Jesus under the wrath of God, and from which He would emerge as “the firstborn from the dead”: 


“And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly [beten:H990] of hell [sheowl:H7585] cried I, [and] thou heardest my voice.”


Luke 1:42 speaks of the Savior’s incarnation: “And she spake out with a loud voice, and said, Blessed [art] thou among women, and blessed [is] the fruit [karpos:G2590] of thy womb.” [koilia:G2836]


I’ll read Ezekiel 47:12 again which is speaking of a spiritual Temple: “And by the river upon the bank thereof, on this side and on that side, shall grow all trees for meat, whose leaf shall not fade, neither shall the fruit thereof be consumed: it shall bring forth new fruit [bakar:H1069] according to his months, because their waters they issued out of the sanctuary: and the fruit thereof shall be for meat, and the leaf thereof for medicine.”


Ezekiel 47:12 is also similar to a few other citations as well, having to do with “bearing fruit”:


In Revelation 22:1-2 we learn of what will take place in the “New Heavens” and “New Earth”: “And he shewed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb. {2} In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, [was there] the tree of life, which bare [poieo:G4160] twelve [manner of] fruits, [karpos:G2590] [and] yielded [apodidomi:G591] her fruit [karpos:G2590] every month: and the leaves of the tree [were] for the healing of the nations.”


With regard to the salvation of each of God’s elect, Psalm 1:3 similarly states: “And he shall be like a tree planted by the rivers of water, that bringeth forth [nathan:H5414] his fruit [periy:H6529] in his season; his leaf also shall not wither; and whatsoever he doeth shall prosper.”

  

Let’s now consider some of the other derivatives of the term, “bakar” (H1069); we have already seen one of them earlier today in Deuteronomy 21:16, which is “bekowr.” (H1060) Here are are some additional ones:


Firstborn [bekowr:H1060]


Genesis 27:32 also acknowledges: “And Isaac his father said unto him, Who [art] thou? And he said, I [am] thy son, thy firstborn [bekowr:H1060] Esau.”


Exodus 4:22-23, “And thou shalt say unto Pharaoh, Thus saith the LORD, Israel [is] my son, [even] my firstborn: [bekowr:H1060] {23} And I say unto thee, Let my son go, that he may serve me: and if thou refuse to let him go, behold, I will slay thy son, [even] thy firstborn.” [bekowr:H1060]


 Firstfruits [bikkuwr:H1061]


The next term that we want to examine is “firstfruits” (bikkuwr:H1061). In verse 16 of Exodus 23:14-17, it appears in connection with the other two feasts that the Israelite males were commanded to observe three times in the year:  


Three times thou shalt keep a feast unto me in the year. {15} Thou shalt keep the feast of unleavened bread: (thou shalt eat unleavened bread seven days, as I commanded thee, in the time appointed of the month Abib; for in it thou camest out from Egypt: and none shall appear before me empty:) {16} And the feast of harvest, the firstfruits [bikkuwr:H1061] of thy labours, which thou hast sown in the field: and the feast of ingathering [or “tabernacles”], [which is] in the end of the year, when thou hast gathered in thy labours out of the field. {17} Three times in the year all thy males shall appear before the Lord GOD.”


Nehemiah 10:35-37 reiterates this as well; additionally all three related terms - G1060, G1061, and G1063 - surface in verses 35 and 36:  “And to bring the firstfruits [bikkuwr:H1061] of our ground, and the firstfruits [bikkuwr:H1061] of all fruit of all trees, year by year, unto the house of the LORD: {36} Also the firstborn [bekowr:H1060] of our sons, and of our cattle, as [it is] written in the law, and the firstlings [bekowrah:H1062] of our herds and of our flocks, to bring to the house of our God, unto the priests that minister in the house of our God: {37} And [that] we should bring the firstfruits of our dough, and our offerings, and the fruit of all manner of trees, of wine and of oil, unto the priests, to the chambers of the house of our God; and the tithes of our ground unto the Levites, that the same Levites might have the tithes in all the cities of our tillage.”


As we saw with the word, “firstborn” (prototokos:G4416) in Greek,  the New Testament also has to be consulted with regard to “firstfruits” (aparche:G536), which we now want to turn our attention to; then, Lord willing, we will look at the last expression, “bekowrah” (H1062), along with its New Testament counterpart.


Firstfruits [aparche:G536] 


The word, “firstfruits” is found eight times in the New Testament, and always translated as such. Here are a few illustrations:


1 Corinthians 15:20 and 23 is a highly significant verse because of the fact that it is associating Christ as the “firstfruits” with the resurrection from the dead at the foundation of the world, and spiritually parallels the word, “firstborn” or “first begotten” from the dead: “But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits [aparche:G536] of them that slept. ... {23} But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits [aparche:G536]; afterward they that are Christ's at his coming.”


The context of verse 18 in James 1:17-18, has to do with salvation, according to God’s divine will and election program, and thus is related to spiritual birth: “Of his own will begat he us with the word of truth, that we should be a kind [tis:G5100] of firstfruits [aparche:G536] of his creatures.” Notice how it says that the elect are “a kind” of firstfruits, in the sense that we too, have been raised from the dead spiritually in our souls, and that was only made possible by virtue of Christ’s Atonement and subsequent resurrection, at the foundation of the world, but  we also look forward to the resurrection of our bodies…


...As Romans 8:23 testifies: “And not only [they], but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits [aparche:G536] of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, [to wit], the redemption of our body.” 


Lastly Revelation 14:4 ties back to the Feast of Pentecost or First Fruits or Weeks (on May 22, 33 AD) when the era of the church age began with great impetus as “...about three thousand souls…” were saved; those who were saved during the 1955 years of the church age are the ones mentioned in this reference as “the firstfruits”: “These are they which were not defiled with women; for they are virgins. These are they which follow the Lamb whithersoever he goeth. These were redeemed from among men, [being] the firstfruits [aparche:G536]  unto God and to the Lamb.”


Birthright [bekowrah:H1062]


The third Hebrew term that we want to examine today is “bekowrah” (G1062). It is primarily rendered as “birthright,” and its parent word is actually “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), and its grandparent word is “bakar” (H1069), which we discussed at the beginning of today’s study, and is translated as “firstborn,” “firstling,” and “new fruit”:


This expression shows up in the account of Esau selling his “birthright” to Jacob, as we see in Genesis 25:31-34, 


“And Jacob said, Sell me this day thy birthright. [bekowrah:H1062]

 {32} And Esau said, Behold, I [am] at the point to die: and what profit shall this birthright [bekowrah:H1062] do to me? {33} And Jacob said, Swear to me this day; and he sware unto him: and he sold his birthright [bekowrah:H1062] unto Jacob. {34} Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentiles; and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way: thus Esau despised [his] birthright.” [bekowrah:H1062] 


Genesis 27:36, records the following conversation between Esau and is father, Isaac: “And he said, Is not he rightly named Jacob? for he hath supplanted me these two times: he took away my birthright [bekowrah:H1062]; and, behold, now he hath taken away my blessing. And he said, Hast thou not reserved a blessing for me?”


Esau is lying here, as he purposefully sold his “birthright” for a bowl of lentil soup, when he was very hungry. In fact we read in Genesis 25:34 that he actually “despised” his “birthright.” Since the “birthright” has to do with the “Firstborn,” Who is the Lord Jesus Christ, effectively Esau despised the Lord Jesus Christ, which is the posture that all the non-elect assume. 


We want to be mindful of that fact that this “birthright” is derived from the expression “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), as I mentioned earlier and is also rendered as “firstborn” in Deuteronomy 21:17, which delineates the “inheritance” or “double portion” which belonged to the firstborn as Deuteronomy 21:17 stipulates, which we discover both terms - the root word, H1060 first; then H1062 second: 


“But he shall acknowledge the son of the hated [for] the firstborn [bekowr:H1060], by giving him a double [shenayim:H8147 - “two”] portion [peh:H6310 - “mouth”] of all that he hath: for he [is] the beginning of his strength; the right of the firstborn [bekowrah:H1062] [is] his.”


Incidentally, the expression “double portion” is also found in verse 9 of 2 Kings 2:9-15, which helps us see the tremendous spiritual import that this word coveys, in which Elisha replies to Elijah’s question:


“And it came to pass, when they were gone over, that Elijah said unto Elisha, Ask what I shall do for thee, before I be taken away from thee. And Elisha said, I pray thee, let a double [shenayim:H8147] portion [peh:H6310] of thy spirit be upon me. {10} And he said, Thou hast asked a hard thing: [nevertheless], if thou see me [when I am] taken from thee, it shall be so unto thee; but if not, it shall not be [so]. {11} And it came to pass, as they still went on, and talked, that, behold, [there appeared] a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted them both asunder; and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven. {12} And Elisha saw [it], and he cried, My father, my father, the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof. And he saw him no more: and he took hold of his own clothes, and rent them in two pieces. {13} He took up also the mantle of Elijah that fell from him, and went back, and stood by the bank of Jordan; {14} And he took the mantle of Elijah that fell from him, and smote the waters, and said, Where [is] the LORD God of Elijah? and when he also had smitten the waters, they parted hither and thither: and Elisha went over. {15} And when the sons of the prophets which [were] to view at Jericho saw him, they said, The spirit of Elijah doth rest on Elisha. And they came to meet him, and bowed themselves to the ground before him. ”


Now let’s go to the New Testament commentary on Esau selling his “birthright” to Jacob in Hebrews 12:15-17, 


“Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble [you], and thereby many be defiled; {16} Lest there [be] any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright. [prototokia:G4415 - from “prototokos” (G4416)] {17} For ye know how that afterward, when he would have inherited the blessing, he was rejected: for he found no place of repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears.”


Lo and behold, this Greek noun “birthright” is “prototokia” (G4415), and it is only used once here in Hebrews 12:16! Does that ring a bell? It should. It stems from the word “prototokos” (G4416), or “firstborn” or “first begotten of the dead” as we saw in Romans 8:29, Colossians 1:15 and 18, and Revelation 1:5  back in Part 8. 


Lord willing, we will continue our investigation in our next study. 

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 14

April 7, 2019


Today’s date is April 14, 2019 and our topic is devoted to the doctrine of “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8), and this will be Part 14. In this series, we have been examining what the Bible actually teaches about this crucial subject, by contrasting  that with what some claim the Bible teaches regarding the assumption that the atonement for sin took place when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD. As we endeavor to compare “spiritual with spiritual,” let us be mindful of the crucial admonition found in Acts 17:11, 


“These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.”


In our ongoing study of this key doctrine we have discovered a number of word study paths that all lead to the inescapable fact that Christ is indeed “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” So far in our study of comparing “spiritual with spiritual,” we have arrived at the following conclusions: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world,” since others were raised from the dead prior to the Crucifixion in 33 AD.
  4. Christ was indeed “poured out” or “offered up” or “melted” - terms that vividly portray annihilation - which He voluntarily subjected Himself to in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world.”
  5. When Christ rose from death and annihilation “...from the foundation of the world,” He received the title, “Son of God.”


  1. Christ is also the “first of the firstfruits” in addition to being the “birthright, both of which point are related to Him being the “firstborn from the dead.” 




In Part 13 we focused on the root word, “bakar” (H1069), and three of its derivatives translated as “firstborn” (bekowr:H1060), “firstfruits” (bikkuwr:H1061), and “birthright” (bekowrah:H1062)  “firstborn.” We also noted that “bakar” (H1069) is translated as “firstling,” “firstborn,” and “first child,” and “new fruit”  in the four references in which it is found. Moreover, God very definitely connects the idea of “childbirth” with “fruit” in a number of passages in both the Old and New Testaments, such as Deuteronomy 7:13 and Luke 1:42, even though a different word for “fruit” is utilized:  


“And he will love thee, and bless thee, and multiply thee: he will also bless the fruit [periy:H6529] of thy womb [beten:H990], and the fruit [periy:H6529] of thy land, thy corn, and thy wine, and thine oil, the increase of thy kine, and the flocks of thy sheep, in the land which he sware unto thy fathers to give thee.”


I made point that the term, “of thy womb” “beten” (H990) is rendered  almost equally as “belly” or “womb.” And in verse 2 of Jonah 2:1-2, it appears as “the belly of hell” (or the grave) referring to the Lord Jesus under the wrath of God, and from which He would emerge as “the firstborn from the dead.” So today, I would like to examine Jonah 2, and see how God has hidden the Atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ “from the foundation of the world”  in this marvelous historical parable. 


Prayer From A Fish’s Belly


I’m going to concentrate on Jonah 2:1-9, which is Jonah’s (or spiritually the Savior’s) prayer which he uttered when he was in the belly of the great fish:


“Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, even to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars was about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God. {7} When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple. {8} They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy. {9} But I will sacrifice unto thee with the voice of thanksgiving; I will pay that that I have vowed. Salvation is of the LORD.”


A Picture Of Christ


We must bear in mind that Jonah’s experience in the whale’s belly lasted three days and three nights as we read in Jonah 1:17,


“Now the LORD had prepared a great fish to swallow up Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights.”


God associates Jonah’s ordeal with Christ suffering “in the heart of the earth” – as we read in Matthew 12:38-40,


“Then certain of the scribes and of the Pharisees answered, saying, Master, we would see a sign from thee. {39} But he answered and said unto them, An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after a sign; and there shall no sign be given to it, but the sign of the prophet Jonas: {40} For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth. {41} The men of Nineveh shall rise in judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it: because they repented at the preaching of Jonas; and, behold, a greater than Jonas is here.”


In Matthew 12:40 God identifies the phrase “in the whale’s belly” with the phrase “in the heart of the earth.”  In turn, Jonah 2:2 helps to clarify that the phrase, “in the heart of the earth,” corresponds to “the belly of hell”  – which is the grave – or destruction:


“And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice.”


The number three is highly significant as it represents the “purpose of God,” and is used very frequently in connection with events leading up to the Cross, the Crucifixion itself, as well as events that occurred after His burial; it also refers spiritually to the sufferings of Christ, which began on Thursday evening with His agony in the Garden of Gethsemane. Starting on Thursday evening and ending with His resurrection early Sunday morning totals 3 days and 3 nights, either by Jewish reckoning (evening-mornings) or by Roman reckoning (from midnight to midnight). Furthermore the analogy of hell (or the grave) characterized by the whale’s belly, gives us additional details that amplify our understanding of what Christ accomplished in the Atonement “at the foundation of the world,” when He paid for the sins of His people. Incomprehensible as it may seem to us, it was at that time that the Savior was annihilated, and then rose again to life – since He is the very essence of eternal life. 


Then Jonah Prayed Unto Jehovah His God [Elohim – the plural form of God]


Jonah prayed…In similar fashion, we see Christ also praying three times in the Garden of Gethsemane - in the demonstration or tableau -  according to Matthew 26:36-45,


“Then cometh Jesus with them unto a place called Gethsemane, and saith unto the disciples, Sit ye here, while I go and pray yonder. {37} And he took with him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be sorrowful and very heavy. {38} Then saith he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry ye here, and watch with me. {39} And he went a little further, and fell on his face, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me: nevertheless not as I will, but as thou [wilt.] {40} And he cometh unto the disciples, and findeth them asleep, and saith unto Peter, What, could ye not watch with me one hour? {41} Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak. {42} He went away again the second time, and prayed, saying, O my Father, if this cup may not pass away from me, except I drink it, thy will be done. {43} And he came and found them asleep again: for their eyes were heavy. {44} And he left them, and went away again, and prayed the third time, saying the same words. {45} Then cometh he to his disciples, and saith unto them, Sleep on now, and take your rest: behold, the hour is at hand, and the Son of man is betrayed into the hands of sinners.


By Reason Of Mine Affliction [tsarah:G6869]


The Hebrew word rendered, “by reason of mine affliction” (tsarah:G6869) is the beginning of a pattern of suffering – both physical as well as mental and spiritual – that Jonah undoubtedly faced – as did the Savior in demonstrating what He had accomplished, on behalf of the elect, prior to Creation. The same word is found twice in Genesis 42:21, but I’ll read verses 17-23 to get the context.  This is the account of Joseph (as second in command of all of Egypt) – another great representation of the Lord Jesus – and his half-brothers who lament the fact that they had thrown Joseph into a pit, and later sold him to a caravan of Ishmaelites who were headed to Egypt:


“And he put them all together into ward [or prison] three days. {18} And Joseph said unto them the third day, This do, and live; for I fear God: {19} If ye be true men, let one of your brethren be bound in the house of your prison: go ye, carry corn for the famine of your houses: {20} But bring your youngest brother unto me; so shall your words be verified, and ye shall not die. And they did so. {21} And they said one to another, We are verily guilty concerning our brother, in that we saw the anguish [tsarah:G6869] of his soul, when he besought us, and we would not hear; therefore is this distress [tsarah:G6869] come upon us.{22} And Reuben answered them, saying, Spake I not unto you, saying, Do not sin against the child; and ye would not hear? therefore, behold, also his blood is required.{23} And they knew not that Joseph understood them; for he spake unto them by an interpreter.” 


In Psalm 25:17-18 it is translated, “The troubles [tsarah:G6869] of my heart are enlarged: O bring thou me out of my distresses. {18} Look upon mine affliction and my pain; and forgive all my sins.”


Likewise in Psalm 143:7-11, it is rendered as “out of trouble” in verse 11: “Hear me speedily, O LORD: my spirit faileth: hide not thy face from me, lest I be like unto them that go down into the pit. {8} Cause me to hear thy lovingkindness in the morning; for in thee do I trust: cause me to know the way wherein I should walk; for I lift up my soul unto thee. {9} Deliver me, O LORD, from mine enemies: I flee unto thee to hide me. {10} Teach me to do thy will; for thou art my God: thy spirit is good; lead me into the land of uprightness. {11} Quicken me [or “make me alive”], O LORD, for thy name’s sake: for thy righteousness’ sake bring my soul out of trouble [tsarah:G6869].”


Two Words For “Belly”


I was a bit intrigued when I realized that God employs two different (and unrelated) Hebrew words for “belly” in the first two verses of Jonah 2. The first one in verse one also appears in Jonah 1:17 where it is rendered “in the belly.” Please note how God links this word to the phrase “…three days and three nights.”


“Now the LORD had prepared a great fish to swallow up Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly [me`ah:G4578] of the fish three days and three nights.


The second occurrence of this first word is in Jonah 2:1, “Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly [me`ah:G4578],”


This word is commonly rendered “bowels” and in a third of the references it points to giving birth; in fact, once it is translated “in my womb” in Ruth 1:1 – in which the widow Naomi (having lost her husband and two sons by death)  –  asks her two Moabitish daughters-in-law, Ruth and Orpah, this poignant question:


“And Naomi said, Turn again, my daughters: why will ye go with me? [are] there yet [any more] sons in my womb [me`ah:G4578], that they may be your husbands?”


This term also symbolizes great emotional fervor or even turmoil in one’s innermost being or “heart,” as in Psalm 40:7-8, where it is rendered “my heart” in verse 8, speaking of the Lord Jesus Christ:


“Then said I, Lo, I come: in the volume of the book it is written of me: {8} I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my heart [me`ah:G4578].” 


Although this verse on the surface is apparently positive, if we consider these same words – “not my will, but thine be done” – as they are uttered in the context of the Garden of Gethsemane, the phrase takes on a very different meaning, as Hebrews 5:7 points out:


“Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared;”


The imagery of birth and the pain associated with birth by extension – or a similar excruciating pain – is what is being expressed by this first Hebrew word, “belly” (me`ah:G4578).


The Second Word For “Belly” [beten:H990)]


Let us now turn our attention to the second Hebrew term that is translated “belly” (beten:G990) in the phrase “out of the belly of hell” – and surfaces only once in the book of Jonah – in Jonah 2:2, 


“And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly [beten:H990] of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice.”


This second word,“out of the belly” (beten:H990) is similar to the first one in meaning, as it is also related to giving birth – or the “womb” – or literally to one’s stomach, one’s “body,” in addition to a person’s emotions. 


Job 1:21 maintains, “And said, Naked came I out of my mother’s womb [beten:H990], and naked shall I return thither: the LORD gave, and the LORD hath taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD.”


And Ecclesiastes 11:5 declares, “As thou knowest not what is the way of the spirit, nor how the bones [do grow] in the womb [beten:H990] of her that is with child: even so thou knowest not the works of God who maketh all.”


Out Of The Belly [beten:H990] Of Hell [sheowl:H7585]


In Jonah 2:2 God shows us the spiritual meaning of the whale’s belly – or the grave (sheowl:H7585)  – which is the Hebrew word “sheowl.” The word translated “grave” is used interchangeably with “hell,” and is found 63 times in the Old Testament. Consider the following illustrations which were also discussed in the Annihilation Or Eternal Suffering series that BMI presented, prior to this series.


1 Samuel 2:6 (which is Hannah’s prayer) declares, “The LORD killeth, and maketh alive: he bringeth down to the grave [sheowl:H7585], and bringeth up.”


Job 17:13 adds, “If I wait, the grave [sheowl:H7585] [is] mine house: I have made my bed in the darkness.”


Psalm 88:3 laments, “For my soul is full of troubles: and my life draweth nigh unto the grave [sheol:H7585].”


And Psalm 89:48 poses this question: “What man is he that liveth, and shall not see death? shall he deliver his soul from the hand of the grave [sheowl:H7585] ? Selah.”


Isaiah 14:11 and 15 acknowledge this as well with regard to Satan: “Thy pomp is brought down to the grave [sheowl:H7585], and the noise of thy viols: the worm is spread under thee, and the worms cover thee….{15} Yet thou shalt be brought down to hell [sheowl:H7585], to the sides of the pit.”


To Swallow Up [bala`:H1104]


The next Hebrew word that we want to investigate is translated “to swallow up” in the phrase “…Now the LORD had prepared a great fish to swallow up [bala`:H1104] Jonah” in Jonah 1:17, even though it does not surface in Jonah’s prayer here in Jonah 2. Nonetheless it is relevant to our discussion as the entry point, if you will, to the whale’s belly. In fact, God utilizes this term to underscore the reality of death and destruction associated with the grave, as the subsequent passages reveal:


Exodus 15:12 states, “Thou stretchedst out thy right hand, the earth [’erets:H776] swallowed [bala`:H1104] them.”


The context of Exodus 15 recounts the victory that God had over Pharaoh Thutmosis III and his army, all of whom perished in the Red Sea, after having safely delivered the Israelites on “dry ground.” Even though this is speaking about the Red Sea, God chose the word “earth” (’erets:H776) to swallow Pharaoh and his troops, because in death we return to the ground, as God stipulated in Genesis 3:19b,


“…for dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.”


Isaiah 14:9 and 12, which specifically point to Satan’s demise, uses this same word “of the earth” (’erets:H776) and “to the ground” (’erets:H776) in association with hell or “sheowl.” Keep in mind that God uses Pharaoh as well as other historical figures – like Nebuchadnezzar – to symbolize Satan:


Hell [sheol:H7585] from beneath is moved for thee to meet thee at thy coming: it stirreth up the dead for thee, even all the chief ones of the earth [’erets:H776]; it hath raised up from their thrones all the kings of the nations… {12} How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! how art thou cut down to the ground [’erets:H776], which didst weaken the nations!”


Psalm 69 is a Messianic psalm (one that exemplifies Christ’s sufferings). Notice how verses 1-2 and 13-15 in this prayer are very similar to some of the phrases we find in Jonah 2:1-9,


“<<To the chief Musician upon Shoshannim, A Psalm of David.>> Save me, O God; for the waters are come in unto my soul. {2} I sink in deep mire, where there is no standing: I am come into deep waters, where the floods overflow me…{13} But as for me, my prayer is unto thee, O LORD, in an acceptable time: O God, in the multitude of thy mercy hear me, in the truth of thy salvation. {14} Deliver me out of the mire, and let me not sink: let me be delivered from them that  hate me, and out of the deep waters. {15} Let not the waterflood overflow me, neither let the deep swallow me up [bala`:H1104], and let not the pit shut her mouth upon me.


Numbers 16:23-40 provide another example of how God uses this word “swallow,” which is repeated three times in this frightening account of God’s swift retribution against Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, along with 250 “princes of the congregation” – all of whom were Levites – and sinfully rebelled against God, by coveting the same responsibilities that God had given only to the priests; please note the three-fold reference to “swallow… up,”  along with the twofold references to “sheowl,” rendered as “into the pit”:


“And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {24} Speak unto the congregation, saying, Get you up from about the tabernacle of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram. {25} And Moses rose up and went unto Dathan and Abiram; and the elders of Israel followed him. {26} And he spake unto the congregation, saying, Depart, I pray you, from the tents of these wicked men, and touch nothing of theirs, lest ye be consumed in all their sins. {27} So they gat up from the tabernacle of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, on every side: and Dathan and Abiram came out, and stood in the door of their tents, and their wives, and their sons, and their little children. {28} And Moses said, Hereby ye shall know that the LORD hath sent me to do all these works; for I have not done them of mine own mind. {29} If these men die the common death of all men, or if they be visited after the visitation of all men; then the LORD hath not sent me. {30} But if the LORD make a new thing, and the earth open her mouth, and swallow them up [bala`:H1104], with all that appertain unto them, and they go down quick into the pit [sheol:H7585]; then ye shall understand that these men have provoked the LORD. {31} And it came to pass, as he had made an end of speaking all these words, that the ground clave asunder that was under them: {32} And the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed them up [bala`:H1104], and their houses, and all the men that appertained unto Korah, and all their goods.{33} They, and all that appertained to them, went down alive into the pit [sheol:H7585], and the earth closed upon them: and they perished from among the congregation.{34} And all Israel that were round about them fled at the cry of them: for they said, Lest the earth swallow us up [bala`:H1104] also.{35} And there came out a fire from the LORD, and consumed the two hundred and fifty men that offered incense.{36} And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {37} Speak unto Eleazar the son of Aaron the priest, that he take up the censers out of the burning, and scatter thou the fire yonder; for they are hallowed.{38} The censers of these sinners against their own souls, let them make them broad plates for a covering of the altar: for they offered them before the LORD, therefore they are hallowed: and they shall be a sign unto the children of Israel.{39} And Eleazar the priest took the brasen censers, wherewith they that were burnt had offered; and they were made broad plates for a covering of the altar: {40} To be a memorial unto the children of Israel, that no stranger, which is not of the seed of Aaron, come near to offer incense before the LORD; that he be not as Korah, and as his company: as the LORD said to him by the hand of Moses.”


Of The Mountains [har:H2022]


In the Bible, the term “mountains” is synonymous with “kingdoms” – referring to either the kingdom of God or the kingdom of Satan. Most notably is the account found in Exodus 19:16-18, in which Israel was to be gathered at the base of Mount Sinai, to hear God pronounce a summary of His law (the 10 commandments) to them; this is also repeated in the book of  Deuteronomy  (which incidentally means “double law”). Please note how God repeats the word, “mountain” (har:H2022) four times in these three verses:


“And it came to pass on the third day in the morning, that there were thunders and lightnings, and a thick cloud upon the mount [har:H2022], and the voice of the trumpet exceeding loud; so that all the people that was in the camp trembled. {17} And Moses brought forth the people out of the camp to meet with God; and they stood at the nether part of the mount [har:H2022]. {18} And mount [har:H2022] Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the LORD descended upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount [har:H2022] quaked greatly.”


Incidentally, the word “nether” (tachtiy:H8482) is the same term that is rendered “unto (or) from the lowest (hell)” that was mentioned previously in Deuteronomy 32:22 and in Psalm 86:13. Mount Sinai is representative of God’s Law (which is the Bible – as is Moses himself). Furthermore, we have understood that the penalty prescribed by the law is death and annihilation, as Romans 6:23a states so succinctly:


“For the wages of sin is death…


So, in essence, when Christ became sin for each of God’s elect “...at the foundation of the world.” He became subject to the Law’s demands – going down to “the bottoms of the mountains” -  to be cut off by death and annihilation for the sins of each of His beloved people.


Let’s stop here, and Lord willing, we will pick up this detour into Jonah 2 in our next study.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 15

April 14, 2019


This is Part 15 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is April 14, 2019. We have taken a detour in our examination of this doctrine in order to consider how Jonah 2, which is a historical parable, points very directly to this doctrine. In our previous study (Part 14) we considered the following terms: “by reason of mine affliction” in Jonah 2:1, “to swallow up” in Jonah 1:17, and “of the mountains” in Jonah 2:6.  

Additionally, we discovered that God also employed two different Hebrew words for “belly”: one in Jonah 2:1 (me`ah:H4578); the other is Jonah 2:2 (beten:H990). Let’s read this prayer of Jonah again in Jonah 2:1-9,


“Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, even to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars was about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God. {7} When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple. {8} They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy. {9} But I will sacrifice unto thee with the voice of thanksgiving; I will pay that that I have vowed. Salvation is of the LORD.”

  

Two Words For “Cried”


God has also utilized two different words for “cried” in Jonah 2:2,


“And said, I cried [qara`:H7121] by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I [shava`:H7768], and thou heardest my voice.


The first one is rendered (qara`:H7121) and you might recognize this word as part of the phrase “qara` shem” which Mr. Camping discovered to indicate an immediate father-son relationship in the genealogies of Genesis 5 and 11. It is translated in a variety of ways, but mostly as “call,” “cried,” “read,” and “proclaim,” appearing in 735 places. For example it crops up numerous times in the verbal exchange between Eli, Samuel, and God in 1 Samuel 3:3-10, which is also a historical parable having to do with the end of the church age:


“And ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the LORD, where the ark of God was, and Samuel was laid down to sleep; {4} That the LORD called [qara`:H7121] Samuel: and he answered, Here am I.{5} And he ran unto Eli, and said, Here am I; for thou calledst [qara`:H7121] me. And he said, I called [qara`:H7121] not; lie down again. And he went and lay down. {6} And the LORD called [qara`:H7121] yet again, Samuel. And Samuel arose and went to Eli, and said, Here am I; for thou didst call [qara`:H7121] me. And he answered, I called [qara`:H7121] not, my son; lie down again. {7} Now Samuel did not yet know the LORD, neither was the word of the LORD yet revealed unto him. {8} And the LORD called [qara`:H7121] Samuel again the third time. And he arose and went to Eli, and said, Here am I; for thou didst call [qara`:H7121]  me. And Eli perceived that the LORD had called [qara`:H7121] the child.{9} Therefore Eli said unto Samuel, Go, lie down: and it shall be, if he call [qara`:H7121] thee, that thou shalt say, Speak, LORD; for thy servant heareth. So Samuel went and lay down in his place. {10} And the LORD came, and stood, and called [qara`:H7121] as at other times, Samuel, Samuel. Then Samuel answered, Speak; for thy servant heareth.”


Jeremiah 36:1-18 is a passage where this same word also surfaces quite frequently as “called,” “read,” “proclaimed,” and “pronounced;” incidentally in this portion of Scripture God tells precisely how He dictated His Word to “holy men of God” (as we read in 2 Peter 1:21):  


“And it came to pass in the fourth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah, that this word came unto Jeremiah from the LORD, saying, {2} Take thee a roll of a book, and write therein all the words that I have spoken unto thee against Israel, and against Judah, and against all the nations, from the day I spake unto thee, from the days of Josiah, even unto this day. {3} It may be that the house of Judah will hear all the evil which I purpose to do unto them; that they may return every man from his evil way; that I may forgive their iniquity and their sin. {4} Then Jeremiah called [qara`:H7121] Baruch the son of Neriah: and Baruch wrote from the mouth of Jeremiah all the words of the LORD, which he had spoken unto him, upon a roll of a book. {5} And Jeremiah commanded Baruch, saying, I am shut up; I cannot go into the house of the LORD: {6} Therefore go thou, and read [qara`:H7121] in the roll, which thou hast written from my mouth, the words of the LORD in the ears of the people in the LORD’S house upon the fasting day: and also thou shalt read [qara`:H7121] them in the ears of all Judah that come out of their cities. {7} It may be they will present their supplication before the LORD, and will return every one from his evil way: for great is the anger and the fury that the LORD hath pronounced against this people. {8} And Baruch the son of Neriah did according to all that Jeremiah the prophet commanded him, reading [qara`:H7121] in the book the words of the LORD in the LORD’S house. {9} And it came to pass in the fifth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah king of Judah, in the ninth month, that they proclaimed [qara`:H7121] a fast before the LORD to all the people in Jerusalem, and to all the people that came from the cities of Judah unto Jerusalem. {10} Then read [qara`:H7121] Baruch in the book the words of Jeremiah in the house of the LORD, in the chamber of Gemariah the son of Shaphan the scribe, in the higher court, at the entry of the new gate of the LORD’S house, in the ears of all the people. {11} When Michaiah the son of Gemariah, the son of Shaphan, had heard out of the book all the words of the LORD, {12} Then he went down into the king’s house, into the scribe’s chamber: and, lo, all the princes sat there, even Elishama the scribe, and Delaiah the son of Shemaiah, and Elnathan the son of Achbor, and Gemariah the son of Shaphan, and Zedekiah the son of Hananiah, and all the princes.{13} Then Michaiah declared unto them all the words that he had heard, when [qara`:H7121] Baruch read [qara`:H7121] the book in the ears of the people. {14} Therefore all the princes sent Jehudi the son of Nethaniah, the son of Shelemiah, the son of Cushi, unto Baruch, saying, Take in thine hand the roll wherein thou hast read [qara`:H7121] in the ears of the people, and come. So Baruch the son of Neriah took the roll in his hand, and came unto them.{ 15} And they said unto him, Sit down now, and read it [qara`:H7121] in our ears. So [qara`:H7121] Baruch read [qara`:H7121] it in their ears. {16} Now it came to pass, when they had heard all the words, they were afraid both one and other, and said unto Baruch, We will surely tell the king of all these words. {17} And they asked Baruch, saying, Tell us now, How didst thou write all these words at his mouth? {18} Then Baruch answered them, He pronounced [qara`:H7121] all these words unto me with his mouth, and I wrote them with ink in the book.


Lamentations 3:53-55 uses similar language to what we find in Jonah 2: “They have cut off my life in the dungeon [bore:H953], and cast a stone upon me. {54} Waters flowed over mine head; then I said, I am cut off. {55} I called [qara`:H7121]  upon thy name, O LORD, out of the low dungeon [bore:H953].


You might also recall that Jeremiah, too, was cast into a pit in which there was only mire…and he sunk in the mire, according to Jeremiah 38:6, where the identical word “dungeon” (bore:H953) appears:


“Then took they Jeremiah, and cast him into the dungeon of Malchiah the son of Hammelech, that was in the court of the prison: and they let down Jeremiah with cords. And in the dungeon [bore:H953] there was no water, but mire: so Jeremiah sunk in the mire.” 


Psalm 42:5-7 is similar to Jonah 2 as it speaks of the “deep,” “waves,” and “billows;” by the way, the latter two are identical in both accounts: 


Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance. {6} O my God, my soul is cast down within me: therefore will I remember thee from the land of Jordan, and of the Hermonites, from the hill Mizar. {7} Deep calleth [qara`:H7121] unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves [mishbar:H4867] and thy billows [gal:H1530] are gone over me.


The Second Word For “Cried”


The second word rendered “cried” (shava`:H7768) is a more forceful word than the first one, even though it is only found in 21 places. The following are Messianic psalms, in which the one petitioning typifies Christ, who is heard by God the Father, as we are reminded in John 11:42,


“And I knew that thou hearest me always: but because of the people which stand by I said [it], that they may believe that thou hast sent me.”


Psalm 18:6 is very similar to Jonah 2, “In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried [shava`:H7768] unto my God: he heard my voice out of his temple, and my cry came before him, even into his ears.”


Psalm 22:24 also acknowledges, “For he hath not despised nor abhorred the affliction of the afflicted; neither hath he hid his face from him; but when he cried [shava`:H7768] unto him, he heard.”


And Psalm 28:1-2 affirm, “<<A Psalm of David.>> Unto thee will I cry, O LORD my rock; be not silent to me: lest, if thou be silent to me, I become like them that go down into the pit. Hear the voice of my supplications, when I cry [shava`:H7768] unto thee, when I lift up my hands toward thy holy oracle.”


Psalm 31:22 likewise declares,  “For I said in my haste, I am cut off from before thine eyes: nevertheless thou heardest the voice of my supplications when I cried  unto thee.”


Two Words For “Heard”


We also discover two different words for “heard” in Jonah 2:2 that are rendered as: “and he heard” (`anah:H6030) and “thou heardest” (shama`:H8085) in Jonah 2:2,


“And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard [`anah:H6030] me; out of the belly of hell cried I, [and] thou heardest [shama`:H8085] my voice.”


These two expressions are also found together in 19 other passages; one of them is also quoted in the account of Joseph and his half-brothers in Genesis 42:22,


“And Reuben answered [`anah:H6030] them, saying, Spake I not unto you, saying, Do not sin against the child; and ye would not hear [shama`:H8085]? therefore, behold, also his blood is required.”


And Psalm 27:7 asserts, Hear [shama`:H8085], O LORD, when I cry with my voice: have mercy also upon me, and answer [`anah:H6030] me.”


Psalm 143:1 similarly maintains, “<<A Psalm of David.>> Hear [shama`:H8085] my prayer, O LORD, give ear to my supplications: in thy faithfulness answer [`anah:H6030] me, and in thy righteousness.”


Isaiah 65:24 is an exceptional passage which testifies of God’s inscrutable faithfulness: “And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer [`anah:H6030]; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear [shama`:H8085].”


Why is God using three different sets of words in Jonah’s prayer so far? We have seen that God links Jonah’s ordeal in the whale’s belly for “three days and three nights” with Christ being “in the heart of the earth” for the same length of time in Matthew 12:40, 


“For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.”


Additionally, the “whale’s belly” is referred to as “the belly of hell (sheol)” – signifying the grave or destruction. We have correctly understood that the death, burial, and resurrection of the Lord Jesus in 33 AD was a vivid re-enactment of the actual payment for sin that necessitated the death and annihilation of the Lord Jesus – even before God created our present universe.


Jonah 2:3


Let’s move on to verse 3: “For thou hadst cast me [shalak:H7993]

into the deep [metsolah:H4688], in the midst [lebab:H3824] of the seas  [yawm:H3220]; and the floods [nahar:H5104] compassed me about [cabab:H5437]: all thy billows [mishbar:H4867] and thy waves [gal:H1530] passed over [`abar:H5674] me.”


For Thou Hadst Cast Me [shalak:H7993]


The next phrase that we want to explore is: “For thou hadst cast me into the deep.”  This is recounting historically what took place in Jonah 1:12 and 15, when the sailors following Jonah’s instructions, threw him into the Mediterranean Sea for the express purpose of calming the fierce storm: 


“And he said unto them, Take me up, and cast me forth [tool:H2904] into the sea; so shall the sea be calm unto you: for I know that for my sake this great tempest is upon you. So they took up Jonah, and cast him forth [tool:H2904] into the sea: and the sea ceased from her raging.”


Incidentally, this same word (tool:H2904) is only used two other times in the book of Jonah – in Jonah 1:4-5,


“But the LORD sent out [tool:H2904] a great wind into the sea, and there was a mighty tempest in the sea, so that the ship was like to be broken. {5} Then the mariners were afraid, and cried every man unto his god, and cast forth [tool:H2904] the wares that were in the ship into the sea, to lighten it of them. But Jonah was gone down into the sides of the ship; and he lay, and was fast asleep.”


This same word (tool:H2904) is also rendered “is cast” in Proverbs 16:33,


“The lot is cast [tool:H2904]  into the lap; but the whole disposing thereof [is] of the LORD.”


What’s noteworthy about this verse is the fact that it explains that God is the One who both knows as well as determines the outcome of the lot which is cast. This is especially significant since the same word translated “lot” (gowral:H1486) in Proverbs 16:33 surfaces no less than three times in Jonah 1:7, pointing once again to the number three – underscoring the purpose of God for Christ to be “…slain from the foundation of the world.”


“And they said every one to his fellow, Come, and let us cast lots [gowral:H1486], that we may know for whose cause this evil is upon us. So they cast lots [gowral:H1486], and the lot [gowral:H1486] fell upon Jonah.”


Even more importantly is the mysterious fact that God the Son voluntarily allows God the Father to exact the required punishment of death and annihilation upon Him, by casting Him into the sea, which again, represents “the grave,” as this next word, “into the deep” affirms:


Into The Deep [metsolah:H4688]


On the surface, the expression “into the deep” (metsolah:H4688) is a reference to the sea, in the historical context, but parabolically to “hell” or the “grave,” as these next citations reveal:


In Psalm 88:6 in it rendered “in the deeps” and notice the connection with the terms, “the lowest pit” and “in darkness” - both of which relate to the grave, as we saw in the Annihilation series: “Thou hast laid me in the lowest pit, in darkness, in the deeps.” [metsolah:H4688]


Exodus 15 is a victory song that the Israelites sung after God delivered them from the Red Sea - another portrait of “hell” or the “grave,” in which this word is translated as “into the bottom” in verse 5:  “The depths have covered them: they sank into the bottom [metsolah:H4688] as a stone.”


This same account is also referenced in Nehemiah 9:11, and again is translated as “into the deeps”: “And thou didst divide the sea before them, so that they went through the midst of the sea on the dry land; and their persecutors thou threwest into the deeps [metsolah:H4688], as a stone into the mighty waters.”


This is also seen in Psalm 69:2 and 15, as “in deep” and “neither let the deep”: “I sink in deep[metsolah:H4688] mire, where [there is] no standing: I am come into deep waters, where the floods overflow me. ... {15} Let not the waterflood overflow me, neither let the deep [metsolah:H4688] swallow me up, and let not the pit shut her mouth upon me.”


Lastly, Micah 7:19 affirms this as well, rendering this expression as, “into the depths,” and please note how the iniquities and sins of the elect are “cast...into the depths of the sea” by virtue of Christ’s sacrificial atonement: 


“He will turn again, he will have compassion upon us; he will subdue our iniquities; and thou wilt cast all their sins into the depths [metsolah:H4688] of the sea.”


In The Midst Of The Seas


The next Hebrew word, “in the midst” (lebab:H3824) occurs 252 times in the Old Testament; 231 times it is translated “heart,” so it could be understood this way: “in the [heart] of the seas.” This of course reminds us of Matthew 12:40, which bears repeating:


“For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.


A similar phrase is found again in Exodus 15:8, which depicts the fall of Pharaoh and his entire army in the Red Sea, although God utilizes a closely related Hebrew word, which is also rendered “in the heart”:


“And with the blast of thy [God’s] nostrils the waters were gathered together, the floods stood upright as an heap, and the depths were congealed in the heart [labe:H3820] of the sea [yawm:H3220].


By the way, the same term “of the sea(s)” (yawm:H3220) is found in both Exo 15:8, as well as in Jonah 2:3, which states:


“For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas [yawm:H3220]; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me.”


And The Floods Compassed Me About


This is now the third reference to “water” in Jonah 2:3; this particular Hebrew word (nahar:H5104) is generally translated “river;” in this instance, however, the translators rendered it, “and the floods.” (nahar:H5104) Let’s focus on the word, “compassed me about” (cabab:H5437), and I think we will find something quite relevant:


Let’s go to 2 Samuel 22:6, which says, “The sorrows of hell compassed me about [cabab:H5437]; the snares of death prevented me;”


Psalm 18 which is practically identical to 2 Samuel 22, is a song that details the victory that God gave to David over Saul and his enemies. Psalm 18:4 declares exactly what 2 Samuel 22:6 affirms,  “The sorrows of hell compassed me about [cabab:H5437]: the snares of death prevented me.”


In Psalm 88:17 it is rendered “they came round about”: “They came round about [cabab:H5437] me daily like water; they compassed me about together.”


All Thy Billows And Thy Waves Passed Over Me


The last phrase that we want to examine in Jonah 2:3 is “all thy billows and thy waves passed over me.”  Again we note the fourth reference to water – billows and waves. The word rendered “billows” (mishbar:H4867) is only found here in Jonah 2:3 – in the other 4 occurrences it is translated “waves.”  For example, here are three of them; two of these chapters have already been quoted so far in today’s study:


2 Samuel 22:5 teaches, When the waves [mishbar:H4867] of death compassed me, the floods of ungodly men made me afraid;”


And Psalm 42:7 acknowledges, “Deep calleth unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves [mishbar:H4867] and thy billows are gone over me.”


Psalm 88:7 further adds, “Thy wrath lieth hard upon me, and thou hast afflicted me with all thy waves [mishbar:H4867]. Selah.”


The Hebrew word that is rendered “and thy waves” (gal:H1530) appears 35 times in the Old Testament. Consider the following citations:


This word surfaces in Psalm 42:7 again, where it is translated “and thy billows”: “Deep calleth unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves and thy billows [gal:H1530] are gone over me.”


In Psalm 107:23-30 this same word is repeated in verses 25 and 29, where it is translated as “waves”: 


“They that go down to the sea in ships, that do business in great waters; {24} These see the works of the LORD, and his wonders in the deep. [metsolah:H4688] {25} For he commandeth, and raiseth the stormy wind, which lifteth up the waves [gal:H1530] thereof. {26} They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths: their soul is melted because of trouble. {27} They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wits’ end. {28} Then they cry unto the LORD in their trouble, and he bringeth them out of their distresses. {29} He maketh the storm a calm, so that the waves [gal:H1530]thereof are still. {30} Then are they glad because they be quiet; so he bringeth them unto their desired haven.”


The last word, “passed over” (`abar:H5674) in the phrase, “all thy billows and thy waves passed over me”  is used almost 500 times in the Old Testament, as the subsequent passages reveal:


In Psalm 124:1-5 this word “passed over” is rendered “had gone over”: “<<A Song of degrees of David.>> If [it had not been] the LORD who was on our side, now may Israel say; {2} If [it had not been] the LORD who was on our side, when men rose up against us: {3} Then they had swallowed us up [bala`:H1104] quick, when their wrath was kindled against us: {4} Then the waters had overwhelmed us, the stream had gone over [`abar:H5674]our soul: {5} Then the proud waters had gone over [`abar:H5674] our soul.”


The Hebrew word that is translated “they had swallowed us up” in verse 3 is the identical word used in Jonah 1:17, as “to swallow up”: “Now the LORD had prepared a great fish to swallow up [bala`:H1104] Jonah. And Jonah was in the belly of the fish three days and three nights.”


For the third time today, Psalm 42:7 is in view again, as verse 7 renders this word as, “are gone”: “Deep calleth unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves and thy billows are gone [`abar:H5674] over me.”


Let’s stop here for today, and Lord willing, we will pick this up in our next lesson.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 16

April 21, 2019


This is Part 16 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is April 21, 2019. We have taken a detour in our examination of this doctrine in order to consider how Jonah 2, which is a historical parable, points very directly to this doctrine. Let’s read this prayer of Jonah again in Jonah 2:1-9,


“Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, even to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars was about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God. {7} When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple. {8} They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy. {9} But I will sacrifice unto thee with the voice of thanksgiving; I will pay that that I have vowed. Salvation is of the LORD.”



I Am Cast Out  [garash:H1644] Of Thy Sight [`ayin:H5869]


The next phrase we want to consider is: “I am cast out of thy sight” in Jonah 2:4. The Hebrew word rendered “I am cast out” (garash:H1644) also appears in the following verses:


Genesis 3:22-24 chronicles mankind’s fall into sin, necessitating God to expel Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden, thereby preventing them from eating of the tree of life; this word is translated “So he drove out…” in verse 24 “And the LORD God said, Behold, the man is become as one of us, to know good and evil: and now, lest he put forth his hand, and take also of the tree of life, and eat, and live for ever: {23} Therefore the LORD God sent him forth from the garden of Eden, to till the ground from whence he was taken. {24} So he drove out [garash:H1644] the man; and he placed at the east of the garden of Eden Cherubims, and a flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of life.”


A similar incident took place with regard to Cain, the first murderer in Genesis 4:11-14 in which this word is rendered in verse 14 as, “Behold thou hast driven me out”: “And now art thou cursed from the earth, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother’s blood from thy hand; {12} When thou tillest the ground, it shall not henceforth yield unto thee her strength; a fugitive and a vagabond shalt thou be in the earth. {13} And Cain said unto the LORD, My punishment is greater than I can bear. Behold, thou hast driven me out [garash:H1644] this day from the face of the earth; and from thy face shall I be hid; and I shall be a fugitive and a vagabond in the earth; and it shall come to pass, that every one that findeth me shall slay me.”


Of Thy Sight [`ayin:H5869]


Undoubtedly, God is omnipresent (or everywhere) and omniscient (knows everything), so one cannot hide from Him as Adam and Eve foolishly tried to do, to no avail. In Proverbs 15:3, the word “out of thy sight” in Jonah 2:4 is rendered as “the eyes”:


“The eyes [`ayin:H5869] of the LORD are in every place, beholding the evil and the good.”


With that in mind, to be “cast out of thy [God’s] sight” is truly a punishment “greater than I can bear” – these words were uttered by Cain in Genesis 4:13b and really serve to express the anguish of those who are outside of the kingdom of God; their fate is to be removed from the presence of God eternally by death and annihilation. They will never be remembered again, as if they never existed in the first place. In the face of such a horrendous prospect, we find words of enormous comfort in the next phrase…


Yet I Will Look Again [nabat:H5027]


This phrase, “yet I will look [again]” (nabat:H5027) is filled with hope – pointing spiritually to a resurrection from death – which can only be referring to the Lord Jesus Christ – who is “the firstborn from the dead,” as we read in Colossians 1:18 – and is portrayed by Jonah in “the belly of hell.”


“And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.”


This same Hebrew word, rendered “yet I will look [again]” (nabat:H5027) is also contained in Isaiah 63:5, which emphasizes the fact that man plays absolutely no role in his salvation – it is all the work and faith of the Lord Jesus Christ alone:


“And I looked [nabat:H5027], and there was none to help; and I wondered that there was none to uphold: therefore mine own arm brought salvation unto me; and my fury, it upheld me.”


Toward Thy Holy Temple [heykal:H1964]


Where did Jonah (or Christ) look again?… “toward thy [God’s] holy temple.”  A similar statement is found in Jonah 2:7, which I will mention, but won’t go into any details, as we will be discussing this further in another study, Lord willing:


“When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple [heykal:H1964].”


2 Samuel 22 (and its parallel chapter Psalm 18) has cropped up in this series on Jonah 2 a number of times, and verse 7 is relevant to our subject of the temple:


“In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried to my God: and he did hear my voice out of his temple [heykal:H1964], and my cry [did enter] into his ears.”


And once again we find a virtually identical statement in Psalm 18:6,


“In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried unto my God: he heard my voice out of his temple [heykal:H1964], and my cry came before him, [even] into his ears.


In John 2:18-21 we also learn,


“Then answered the Jews and said unto him, What sign [semeion:G4592] shewest thou unto us, seeing that thou doest these things? {19} Jesus answered and said unto them, Destroy [lyo:G3089] this temple [naos:G3485], and in three days I will raise it up. {20} Then said the Jews, Forty and six years was this temple [naos:G3485], in building, and wilt thou rear it up in three days? {21} But he spake of the temple [naos:G3485], of his body.”


The word, “Destroy” (lyo:G3089 - also translated as: “break,” “loose,” “dissolve,” and “melt”) in John 2:19  highlights the “destruction” that the Savior succumbed to at “...the foundation of the world.”  This also matches the expression “I was set up” (nacak:H5258) in Proverbs 8:23, which is similarly rendered as “pour,” “pour out,” “cover,” “offer,” “melteth,” and “molten.” The exact word for “sign” (semeion:G4592) that surfaces 4 times in this passage appears in Luke 11:29-32, divulging very strategic information which contrasts Jonah with the Lord Jesus Christ: 


“And when the people were gathered thick together, he began to say, This is an evil generation: they seek a sign [semeion:G4592]; and there shall no sign [semeion:G4592] be given it, but the sign [semeion:G4592] of Jonas the prophet. {30} For as Jonas was a sign [semeion:G4592]  unto the Ninevites, so shall also the Son of man be to this generation. {31} The queen of the south shall rise up in the judgment with the men of this generation, and condemn them: for she came from the utmost parts of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon; and, behold, a greater than Solomon is here. {32} The men of Nineve shall rise up in the judgment with this generation, and shall condemn it: for they repented at the preaching of Jonas; and, behold, a greater than Jonas is here.”


Jonah 2:5


Let’s proceed to verse 5:  “The waters compassed me about [’aphaph:H661], even to the soul: the depth closed me round about [cabab:H5437], the weeds were wrapped about my head.”


Previously, we noted a curious phenomena: four sets of different Hebrew words that God chose to utilize – “belly,” “cried,” “heard,” and “cast out.”  The two words in each of these sets are not related to each other at all – they were completely different. I remarked that perhaps God did this to underscore that what is taking place in the narrative as a double portrait,  pointing to the death (and subsequent) destruction of the Lord Jesus “...from the foundation of the world,” as well as the tableau in 33 AD.


A Second Word For “Compassed Me About” [’aphaph:H661] 


Now we are faced with another such set of words in verse 5. This second Hebrew term is rendered “compassed me about.” (’aphaph:H661), and appears first in verse 5. Previously in Jonah 2:3, we discussed the second word “compassed ” (cabab:H5437), which in verse 5 is translated “closed me round about.” H661 is found in only four other places in the Old Testament, and when I checked each of these out I realized that they (along with their contexts) dramatically pinpoint and verify the nature of judgment which God is reiterating in a very dramatic way; moreover we discovered in Jonah 2:1-4 that God kept bringing us back to three of these very same chapters – 2 Samuel 2; Psalm 18; and Psalm 40.



2 Samuel 22:5-6 proclaims, “When the waves of death compassed [’aphaph:H661] me, the floods of ungodly men made me afraid; {6} The sorrows of hell compassed me about; the snares of death prevented me;


Psalm 18:4-5 likewise asserts, “The sorrows of death compassed [’aphaph:H661] me, and the floods of ungodly men made me afraid. {5} The sorrows of hell compassed me about: the snares of death prevented me.


And Psalm 40:12 states, “For innumerable evils have compassed [’aphaph:H661] me about: mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, so that I am not able to look up; they are more than the hairs of mine head: therefore my heart faileth me.”


In Psalm 40:12 we read this phrase: “…mine iniquities have taken hold upon me, so that I am not able to look up;When we compare this verse with Luke 18:13, we learn why the Publican “would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven”:


“And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner.”


Lastly, Psalm 116:3 concurs with the other passages that were just quoted: “The sorrows of death compassed [’aphaph:H661] me, and the pains of hell gat hold upon me: I found trouble and sorrow.”


[Even] To The Soul [nephesh:H5315]


The next Hebrew word we want to explore is rendered “to the soul,” in Jonah 2:5, and is found over 600 times in the Old Testament and is translated in many different ways. For example, it appears three times in Leviticus 17:11; this verse helps to clarify the fact that Christ’s blood signifies His very life – which He voluntarily gave up – at “... the foundation of the world” when He made payment for the sins of His beloved Body or Bride, comprised of all the elect: 


Please note how this word is repeated three times as “life” or “souls” in Leviticus 17:11, which declares,:For the life [nephesh:H5315]of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls [nephesh:H5315]: for it is the blood that maketh an atonement for the soul [nephesh:H5315].


The same word also appears in verse 5 of  Deuteronomy 6:4-9, as: “and with all thy soul”: “Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God is one LORD: {5} And thou shalt love the LORD thy God with all thine heart, and with all thy soul [nephesh:H5315], and with all thy might. {6} And these words, which I command thee this day, shall be in thine heart: {7} And thou shalt teach them diligently unto thy children, and shalt talk of them when thou sittest in thine house, and when thou walkest by the way, and when thou liest down, and when thou risest up. {8} And thou shalt bind them for a sign upon thine hand, and they shall be as frontlets between thine eyes. {9} And thou shalt write them upon the posts of thy house, and on thy gates.


And in 1 Samuel 2:35, the word “soul” is rendered “and in my mind”: “And I will raise me up a faithful priest, [that] shall do according to [that] which [is] in mine heart and in my mind [nephesh:H5315]: and I will build him a sure house; and he shall walk before mine anointed for ever.”


The Weeds


The expression “weeds”  (soof:H5488) in Jonah 2:5 is only translated this way here in Jonah 2:5; everywhere else it is found as Red, as in the “Red” Sea, with the exception of the word “flags,” which occurs three times. You might recall that the “Red” Sea is also a dramatic picture of “hell” or the “grave.”


In Exodus 2:3, we read the following account concerning Moses’ mother:“And when she could not longer hide him, she took for him an ark of bulrushes, and daubed it with slime and with pitch, and put the child therein; and she laid [it] in the flags [soof:H5488] by the river’s brink.”


You might also recall Rahab’s powerful testimony that she gave to the two spies, in which she boldly made intercession for her individual family members in Joshua 2:9-13. In verse 10, she makes reference to the Red Sea in which Pharaoh Thutmosis III, and his entire Egyptian army - who typify Satan and all the non-elect - lost their lives:


“And she said unto the men, I know that the LORD hath given you the land, and that your terror is fallen upon us, and that all the inhabitants of the land faint because of you. {10} For we have heard how the LORD dried up the water of the Red [soof:H5488] sea for you, when ye came out of Egypt; and what ye did unto the two kings of the Amorites, that were on the other side Jordan, Sihon and Og, whom ye utterly destroyed. {11} And as soon as we had heard these things, our hearts did melt, neither did there remain any more courage in any man, because of you: for the LORD your God, he is God in heaven above, and in earth beneath. {12} Now therefore, I pray you, swear unto me by the   LORD, since I have shewed you kindness, that ye will also shew kindness unto my father’s house, and give me a true token:{13} And that ye will save alive my father, and my mother, and my brethren, and my sisters, and all that they have, and deliver our lives from death. {14} And the men answered her, Our life for yours, if ye utter not this our business. And it shall be, when the LORD hath given us the land, that we will deal kindly and truly with thee. {15} Then she let them down by a cord through the window: for her house was upon the town wall, and she dwelt upon the wall. {16} And she said unto them, Get you to the mountain, lest the pursuers meet you; and hide yourselves there three days, until the pursuers be returned: and afterward may ye go your way. {17} And the men said unto her, We will be blameless of this thine oath which thou hast made us swear. {18} Behold, when we come into the land, thou shalt bind this line of scarlet thread in the window which thou didst let us down by: and thou shalt bring thy father, and thy mother, and thy brethren, and all thy father’s household, home unto thee.


Were Wrapped About [chabash:H2280]


The Hebrew word rendered “were wrapped about” (chabash:H2280) - referring to the weeds” - is a striking word picture which identifies with the “Red [Sea]” or “the grave” and encase Jonah’s (i.e., Christ’s) head in the historical context, as he is in the “belly of the whale” - or “the belly of hell”  the grave.” 


In Psalm 147:3, this same word is translated, “and bindeth up,” and reveals the spiritual “binding” that engulfed the Lord Jesus, in order for God’s justice to be satisfied, thus providing the wonderful gift of forgiveness: “He healeth the broken in heart, and bindeth up [chabash:H2280] their wounds.”


And in Isaiah 1:6, utilizing the analogy of leprosy as a vivid portrait of sin, the term “neither bound up” is employed, which typifies man in his “natural” or unsaved state: “From the sole of the foot even unto the head there is no soundness in it; but wounds, and bruises, and putrifying sores: they have not been closed, neither bound up [chabash:H2280], neither mollified with ointment.”


My Head [ro’sh:H7218]


The same word rendered “as head” (ro’sh:H7218) in 1 Chronicles 29:11 reminds us of the fact that Christ is the head of the eternal church, as well as all His creation: 


“Thine, O LORD, is the greatness, and the power, and the glory, and the victory, and the majesty: for all that is in the heaven and in the earth is thine; thine is the kingdom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head [ro’sh:H7218] above all.”


Jonah 2:6


Continuing forward  to verse 6 we read: “I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars [was] about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God.”


We have already considered the term, “of the mountains” in Part 14, which is a reference to the kingdom of God, and more specifically to the Law of God, which Christ was subjected to in the Atonement at “...the foundation of the world,” and actually became sin, as He was bearing the sins of His people, and as a result was annihilated by the Law of God, as 2 Corinthians 5:21 and 1 Corinthians 15:56 respectively underscore:


“For he hath made him [to be] sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him.”


“The sting of death [is] sin; and the strength of sin [is] the law.”


I Went Down [yarad:H3381] To The Bottoms [qetseb:H7095]


The expression, “I went down,” is indicative of “hell” or “the grave,” as was brought out in BMI’s previous video series on “Annihilation Or Eternal Suffering,” according to the subsequent references; bear in mind that “she’owl” (H7585) is rendered almost equally as “the grave” or “hell”: 


In Genesis 37:35 we read of Jacob’s anguished state of mind in hearing about Joseph’s presumed death: “And all his sons and all his daughters rose up to comfort him; but he refused to be comforted; and he said, For I will go down [yarad:H3381] into the grave [she’owl:G7585] unto my son mourning. Thus his father wept for him.”


Exodus 15:5 records the fate of Pharaoh and the entire Egyptian army once again: “The depths have covered them: they sank [yarad:H3381] into the bottom [metsowlah:H4688] as a stone.”


The word, “into the bottom,” in Exodus 15:5 is not the same term that we find in Jonah 2:6, but it is the same as the expression, “into the deep,” in Jonah 2:3,


For thou hadst cast me into the deep [metsowlah:H4688], in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. 


On the other hand, “to the bottoms” (qetseb:H7095) in Jonah 2:5 is only translated as “one size” in two other passages having to do with the “cherubs” and the “bases” of the 10 “lavers” in the Temple, which is more difficult to ascertain. However it is identically spelled to its root word, “qatsab” (H7094) which has to do with Christ being “cut off” or “cut down,” as we find it employed in only two other places, one of which is 2 Kings 6:6, 


“And the man of God said, Where fell it? And he shewed him the place. And he cut down [qatsab:H7094] a stick, and cast [it] in thither; and the iron did swim.”


The Earth [erets:H776] 


It’s curious that God uses the language of “the earth” in the phrase, “the earth with her bars was about me for ever” – even as He used the word “mountains” to describe what is historically taking place beneath the Mediterranean Sea. However, the fact that God uses the word “earth” (erets:H776) gives further confirmation that death is in view, because as I mentioned previously, when we die we return to the earth, as God pronounced back in Genesis 3:19, even though two different words are employed for “ground” and “dust”:


“In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground [adamah:H127]; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust [`aphar:H6083] thou art, and unto dust [`aphar:H6083] shalt thou return.”


The same word for “to the earth” is also found in Ecclesiastes 12:7, “Then shall the dust [`aphar:H6083] return to the earth [erets:H776] as it was: and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it.”


With Her Bars [beriyach:H1280] 


Additional information regarding “the earth” (symbolizing death) is described by the phrase “with her bars [was] about me for ever” (beriyach:H1280). Verse 16 in particular – along with verses 10 and 14 – of Psalm 107:8-16 provide insights as to what these “bars” are referring to, as the context unfolds: 


“Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men! {9} For he satisfieth the longing soul, and filleth the hungry soul with goodness. {10} Such as sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, being bound in affliction and iron; {11} Because they rebelled against the words of God, and contemned the counsel of the most High: {12} Therefore he brought down their heart with labour; they fell down, and there was none to help.{13} Then they cried unto the LORD in their trouble, and he saved them out of their distresses.{14} He brought them out of darkness and the shadow of death, and brake their bands in sunder.{15} Oh that men would praise the LORD for his goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men!{16} For he hath broken the gates of brass, and cut the bars [beriyach:H1280] of iron in sunder.”


The words “darkness,” “shadow of death,” “bound in affliction and iron,” “bands,” and “cut the bars of iron in sunder” all point to spiritual captivity, confinement, and death that unsaved man is subjected to; Christ (whom Jonah pictured) was delivered over to the same fate “...at the foundation of the world.” The reason we know this stems from other verses, including our next word, that is rendered, “[was] about me for ever” (`olam:H5769), but we will have to wait until our next study as we have run out of time.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 17

April 28, 2019


This is Part 17 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is April 28, 2019. We have taken a detour in our examination of this doctrine in order to consider how Jonah 2, which is a historical parable, points very directly to this doctrine. Let’s read this prayer of Jonah again in Jonah 2:1-9,


“Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, even to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars [was] about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God. {7} When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple. {8} They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy. {9} But I will sacrifice unto thee with the voice of thanksgiving; I will pay that that I have vowed. Salvation is of the LORD.”


[Was] About Me Forever [`olam:H5769]   


In our last study we left off in Jonah 2:6, and the Hebrew word, “...[was] about me for ever…” referring to “the earth with her bars,” which pointed spiritually to the grave and annihilation that the Lord Jesus (typified by Jonah) was confined to. This particular Hebrew term, “`olam”  is found over 400 times in the Old Testament. The following are a few examples: 


Exodus 15:18 asserts, “The LORD shall reign for ever [`olam:H5769] and ever.”


Psalm 28:9 declares, “Save thy people, and bless thine inheritance: feed them also, and lift them up for ever [`olam:H5769].”


In Psalm 55:22, it is translated “he shall never”: “Cast thy burden upon the LORD, and he shall sustain thee: he shall never [`olam:H5769] suffer [i.e., “allow”] the righteous to be moved.”


Proverbs 10:25 adds, “As the whirlwind passeth, so [is] the wicked no [more]: but the righteous is an everlasting [`olam:H5769] foundation.” 


And Jeremiah 23:40 speaking of those who rule in the churches and denominations (which God abandoned as of May 21, 1988) makes this profound statement, in which this word is translated as “everlasting” and “perpetual”: “And I will bring an everlasting [`olam:H5769] reproach upon you, and a perpetual [`olam:H5769]  shame, which shall not be forgotten.   



Yet Hast Thou Brought Up [alah:5927]


In light of what was just discussed regarding the finality of death and annihilation, the next Hebrew expression, “yet hast thou brought up,” (`alah:5927) in the phrase, “...yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God,” is one of the most profound statements found in the entire Bible, as it highlights the awesome display of God’s majestic power and glorious hope that is contained in the Resurrection, and is undoubtedly, one of the greatest themes in all of Scripture. This term surfaces almost 900 times in the Old Testament, as the succeeding passages teach:


In Genesis 22:2, and 13 God utilizes this word in both verses as He commands Abraham to “offer” Isaac as a sacrifice to God, and then at the very last moment, orders him not to kill Isaac, but rather to substitute a ram in Isaac’s place - another stupendous historical parable of the Atonement at “... the foundation of the world”:


“And he said, Take now thy son, thine only son Isaac, whom thou lovest, and get thee into the land of Moriah; and offer him [`alah:5927] there for a burnt offering upon one of the mountains which I will tell thee of… {13} And Abraham lifted up his eyes, and looked, and behold behind him a ram caught in a thicket by his horns: and Abraham went and took the ram, and offered him up [`alah:5927] for a burnt offering in the stead of his son.


Deuteronomy 20:1 includes both a reminder as well as an admonition: “When thou goest out to battle against thine enemies, and seest horses, and chariots, and a people more than thou, be not afraid of them: for the LORD thy God is with thee, which brought thee up [`alah:5927] out of the land of Egypt.


Joshua 24:32 connects the “bones” (i.e., all the elect who had died) of Joseph (who represents the Savior), along with the Israelites who were alive, and left Egypt together on the night of the Passover - spiritually highlighting all the elect who were saved by May 21, 2011, and the glorious spiritual Temple was finally completed: “And the bones of Joseph, which the children of Israel brought up [`alah:5927] out of Egypt, buried they in Shechem, in a parcel of ground which Jacob bought of the sons of Hamor the father of Shechem for an hundred pieces of silver: and it became the inheritance of the children of Joseph.”


Job 7:9 reveals the sad reality that all the non-elect will never be resurrected, but will simply be annihilated: “[As]the cloud is consumed and vanisheth away: so he that goeth down to the grave shall come up [`alah:5927] no [more].”


By contrast, Psalm 71:20 promises everlasting hope and life to all who are indeed God’s redeemed:  “[Thou], which hast shewed me great and sore troubles, shalt quicken me again, and shalt bring me up [`alah:5927] again from the depths of the earth.”


My Life [chay:H2416]


The Hebrew word translated “my life” (chay:H2416) in the phrase, “... “...yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God,” occurs over 500 times in the Old Testament, and is rendered in a variety of different ways, but in the majority of instances, as “live” or “life.”  For example, in Genesis 2:7 it refers to man’s physical life which God bestowed upon Adam and the entire human race; and in Genesis 2:9 it singles out the “…tree of life… in the midst of the garden…”


Genesis 2:7 explains, “And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life [chay:H2416]; and man became a living [chay:H2416] soul…{9} And out of the ground made the LORD God to grow every tree that is pleasant to the sight, and good for food; the tree of life [chay:H2416] also in the midst of the garden, and the tree of knowledge of good and evil.


Job 12:10 speaking of God, states: “In whose hand is the soul of every living thing [chay:H2416], and the breath of all mankind.”


Psalm 16:11 specifies the sovereignty and security of God’s magnificent salvation program when it was still in effect: “Thou wilt shew me the path of life [chay:H2416]: in thy presence is fulness of joy; at thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore.”


Psalm 56:13 concurs, “For thou hast delivered my soul from death: wilt not thou deliver my feet from falling, that I may walk before God in the light of the living [chay:H2416] ?”  


Psalm 103:4 similarly declares, “Who redeemeth thy life [chay:H2416] from destruction [shacath:H7845]; who crowneth thee with lovingkindness and tender mercies;” 


From Corruption [shachath:H7845]


I would like to point out that the word translated “from destruction” (shacath:H7845) in Psalm 103:4 is the identical word found in Jonah 2:6 – “from corruption.”  This term is found 23 times in the Old Testament (which is interesting as the number “23” spiritually underscores judgment) and helps us to gain a deeper appreciation of the wrath of God – which is death – that the Lord Jesus was subjected to at “...the foundation of the world.” One of those 23 references is found in Psalm 16:10, which by the way, is quoted in Acts 2:27 and 31:


“For thou wilt not leave my soul [nephesh:H5315] in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption [shachath:H7845].”


Acts 2:27 actually quotes Psalm 16:10 word for word, while Acts 2:31 provides us with a commentary regarding its spiritual significance:


“Because thou wilt not leave my soul in hell, neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption [diaphthora:H1312]…{31} He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption.


As was discovered in BMI’s previous series on Annihilation Or Eternal Suffering, the Greek word that is translated “corruption” (diaphthora:G1312) in Acts 2:27 and 2:31 is only found four other times in Acts 13:34-37. The fact that Christ’s soul was not left in hell, and did not experience “corruption” indicates that it was left in hell (temporarily – since He rose from the dead – being greater than death) and that His flesh did experience corruption (or destruction) prior to Creation – not in 33 AD – since His body did not undergo any type of decay at that time, as Acts 2:29-31 so clearly stipulates: 


“Men [and] brethren, let me freely speak unto you of the patriarch David, that he is both dead and buried, and his sepulchre is with us unto this day. {30} Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath to him, that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, he would raise up Christ to sit on his throne; {31} He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his flesh did see corruption [diaphthora:H1312].”


As I just indicated, this is also corroborated in Acts 13:34-37 four times, underscoring the universal nature of “corruption”; I will read verses 32-37 in order to pick up the context: 


  1. “And we declare unto you glad tidings, how that the promise which was made unto the fathers, {33} God hath fulfilled the same unto us their children, in that he hath raised up Jesus again; as it is also written in the second psalm, Thou art my Son, this day have I begotten thee. {34} And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead, now no more to return to corruption [diaphthora:H1312], he said on this wise, I will give you the sure mercies of David. {35} Wherefore he saith also in another psalm, Thou shalt not suffer thine Holy One to see corruption [diaphthora:H1312]. {36} For David, after he had served his own generation by the will of God, fell on sleep, and was laid unto his fathers, and saw corruption [diaphthora:H1312]:{37} But he, whom God raised again, saw no corruption [diaphthora:H1312].”


Here are some additional passages which contain the Hebrew word rendered “corruption” (shachath:H7845) in Jonah 2:6, 


Psalm 49:6-9 “They that trust in their wealth, and boast themselves in the multitude of their riches; {7} None [of them] can by any means redeem his brother, nor give to God a ransom for him: {8} (For the redemption of their soul is precious, and it ceaseth for ever:) {9} That he should still live for ever, and not see corruption [shachath:H7845].”


In Job 17:14-16, Job (a picture of Christ Himself) acknowledges the same, and please note how here again “corruption” is linked to “the worm,” to “the bars of the pit,” and “the dust”:  “I have said to corruption [shachath:H7845], Thou art my father: to the worm, Thou art my mother, and my sister. {15} And where is now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it? {16} They shall go down to the bars [a different word than in Jonah 2:6] of the pit [she’owl:H7585], when our rest together is in the dust.


O LORD, [Yehovah:H3068] My God [`elohiym:H430]


Verse 6 ends with two powerful words for God Himself – “O LORD” (Yehovah:H3068) and “my God” (`elohiym:H430). This recognition of the Triune God (since “elohiym” denotes plurality) also highlights the reality that God - Who is the Savior -  alone has the power to bring “…up my [Christ’s or the elect’s] life from corruption.” 



Verse 7


In the time remaining, let us examine Jonah 2:7, which affirms, “When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple.”


When My Soul [nephesh:H5315] 


The word rendered “soul” (nephesh:H5315) in the phrase, “when my soul fainted” is the same word that is translated as “even to the soul,” that was discussed in verse 5.  In Psalm 30:3, we discover the identical words for “thou hast brought up” (`alah:H5927) in Jonah 2:6 and “soul” (nephesh:H5315) in both Jonah 2:5 and 7 “O LORD, thou hast brought [alah:H5927] up my soul [nephesh:H5315] from the grave: thou hast kept me alive, that I should not go down to the pit.”



Fainted [`ataph:H5848]


The word that is rendered “fainted” (`ataph:H5848) aptly describes the overwhelming need for God’s deliverance. We must always keep in mind that this is speaking of the Lord Jesus who is crying out from “the belly of hell.” It is parallel to his crying out in the Garden of Gethsemane (as He suffered in agony the second time in order to give us a clearer understanding of the atonement that took place at “...the foundation of the world”) as Hebrews 5:7 highlights,


“Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared;”


In these next passages, the word “fainted” is translated “overwhelmed.” These verses acknowledge the mercy by which God answered the Savior’s plea, on behalf of all His elect people as was noted in Jonah 2:6, by the glorious hope of the resurrection, after the atonement was completed:“… yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God.” 


Psalm 61:2 acknowledges: “From the end of the earth will I cry unto thee, when my heart is overwhelmed [`ataph:H5848]: lead me to the rock that is higher than I.”


And Psalm 77:3 reveals, “I remembered God, and was troubled: I complained, and my spirit was overwhelmed. [`ataph:H5848] Selah.”


Psalm 102:1 also affirms, “<<A Prayer of the afflicted, when he is overwhelmed [`ataph:H5848], and poureth out his complaint before the LORD.>> Hear my prayer, O LORD, and let my cry come unto thee.”


Psalm 142:3 likewise asserts, “When my spirit was overwhelmed [`ataph:H5848] within me, then thou knewest my path. In the way wherein I walked have they privily laid a snare for me.”


Within Me I Remembered [zakar:H2142]


The next phrase that we want to examine is: “within me I remembered the LORD (or Jehovah).”  A believer can’t go very far without remembering the LORD, which is not the norm for those who are non-elect, as we read in Psalm 10:4,


“The wicked, through the pride of his countenance, will not seek after God: God is not in all his thoughts.” 


The term that is translated “within me I remembered” (zakar:H2142) also appears in the succeeding citations:


In 1 Chronicles 16 (which incidentally is virtually identical to Psalm 105) this word shows up in verses 12 and 15, as “remember” and “be ye mindful”: “Remember [zakar:H2142] his marvellous works that he hath done, his wonders, and the judgments of his mouth…{15} Be ye mindful [zakar:H2142] always of his covenant; the word which he commanded to a thousand generations;


Psalm 20:7 is an excellent reminder of where a child of God’s true focus needs to be: “Some [trust] in chariots, and some in horses: but we will remember [zakar:H2142] the name of the LORD our God.”


And Psalm 77:11 states, “I will remember [zakar:H2142]  the works of the LORD: surely I will remember [zakar:H2142] thy wonders of old.”


The LORD [Yehovah:H3068]


At the end of verse six, we encountered the words, “O LORD [Yehovah:H3068], my God,” and I mentioned that the Hebrew word, “LORD” in capital letters is the word “Jehovah,” which is also found in verse 7. God also associates “Jehovah” with the word “Saviour” (yasha`:H3467), as the following citations indicate: 


Isaiah 43:3 declares, “For I am the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Saviour [yasha`:H3467]: I gave Egypt for thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba for thee.”


Isaiah 43:11 adds, “I, even I, am the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]; and beside me there is no savior [yasha`:H3467].”


The usage of “Lord” (kurios:G2962) and “Saviour” (soter:G4982) is also seen in the New Testament, as Luke 2:11 proclaims, 


“For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Saviour [soter:G4982], which is Christ the Lord [kurios:G2962].”


I think we’ll stop here, and Lord willing, next Sunday, we will continue investigating the rest of Jonah 2:7, “...and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple.”

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 18

May 5, 2019


This is Part 18 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is May 5, 2019. We have taken a detour in our examination of this doctrine in order to consider how Jonah 2, which is a historical parable, points very directly to this doctrine. Let’s read this prayer of Jonah again in Jonah 2:1-9,


“Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, even to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars [was] about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God. {7} When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple. {8} They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy. {9} But I will sacrifice unto thee with the voice of thanksgiving; I will pay that that I have vowed. Salvation is of the LORD.”



And My Prayer [tephillah:H8605] 


Getting back to Jonah 2:7, let’s begin by looking at the word “prayer,” (tephillah:H8605) found in the latter part of verse 7. We have already seen how Jonah 2:1-9 is a prayer all by itself – a prayer for deliverance from death – as well as the hope of the resurrection. In Jonah 2:1-9 there are also two different Hebrew words for “prayed” (palal:H6419) in verse 1 -  and “prayer” (tephillah:H8605) in verse 7 - bringing the total number of sets of words to five total so far: “belly,” “cried,” “heard,” “compassed/closed me round about,” and now “prayed/prayer.” The latter, which is a noun, is derived from the first one, which is a verb; I’ll start with “prayed,” in Jonah 2:1 first, which is also found in Jonah 4:2,


And he [Jonah] prayed [palal:H6419] unto the LORD, and said, I pray thee, O LORD, was not this my saying, when I was yet in my country? Therefore I fled before unto Tarshish: for I knew that thou art a gracious God, and merciful, slow to anger, and of great kindness, and repentest thee of the evil.”


Similarly, Daniel 9:4 records part of Daniel’s prayer: And I prayed [palal:H6419] unto the LORD my God, and made my confession, and said, O Lord, the great and dreadful God, keeping the covenant and mercy to them that love him, and to them that keep his commandments;”


This same word also appears three times in a negative context in the book of Jeremiah, where God commands that prayer not be made for Judah and Jerusalem because of their rebellion and refusal to go into captivity to Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon. This is a tremendous spiritual portrait that one is not to pray for the institution of the churches and denominations worldwide, and without exception (who are typified by Judah and Jerusalem) since they came under the judgment of God on May 21, 1988. By the way both, words for “pray” (palal:H6419) and “prayer” (tephillah:H8605) are found in both Jeremiah 7:16 and Jeremiah 11:14,


Jeremiah 7:16 proclaims, Therefore pray [palal:H6419] not thou for this people, neither lift up cry nor prayer [tephillah:H8605] for them, neither make intercession to me: for I will not hear thee.”


Likewise, Jeremiah 11:14 asserts, Therefore pray [palal:H6419] not thou for this people, neither lift up a cry or prayer [tephillah:H8605] for them: for I will not hear them in the time that they cry unto me for their trouble.”


And Jeremiah 14:11 concurs, “Then said the LORD unto me, Pray [palal:H6419] not for this people for their good.”


The noun form (H8605) is utilized 77 times in the Old Testament, as the following passages reveal:


Psalm 39:12 acknowledges, “Hear my prayer [tephillah:H8605], O LORD, and give ear unto my cry; hold not thy peace at my tears: for I am a stranger with thee, and a sojourner, as all my fathers were.”


Likewise we read in Psalm 69:13, But as for me, my prayer [tephillah:H8605] is unto thee, O LORD, in an acceptable time: O God, in the multitude of thy mercy hear me, in the truth of thy salvation.”


In Psalm 141:2 we learn that God equates “prayer” with incense:  “Let my prayer [tephillah:H8605] be set forth before thee as incense; and the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice.”


This same idea is picked up in the New Testament as well, according to Revelation 8:3-4, 


“And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer; and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. {4} And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel’s hand.”


 Came In [bow`:H935] 


The word that is rendered “came in” is used extensively in the Old Testament – some 2300 plus times – in a wide variety of ways, but predominantly as a form of the verb “to come,” as these next citations reveal:


This word is found in verse 6 of  Psalm 18 which has cropped up a number of times in our study of Jonah 2: “In my distress I called upon the LORD, and cried unto my God: he heard my voice out of his temple, and my cry came [bow`:H935] before him, even into his ears.”


Psalm 88:2 similarly declares, “Let my prayer come [bow`:H935] before thee: incline thine ear unto my cry;”


And Psalm 119:170 further adds: “Let my supplication come [bow`:H935] before thee: deliver me according to thy word.”


Unto Thee, Into Thine Holy [qodesh:H6944] Temple [heykal:H1964]


The last phrase in Jonah 2:7 is: “unto thee, into thine holy temple” which actually consists of  two Hebrew words “holy” (qodesh:H6944) and “temple” (heykal:H1964). These two terms appear together in 13 verses. Here are a few examples:


We ran across these same two words in Jonah 2:4, “Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy [qodesh:H6944] temple [heykal:H1964].”


Psalm 138:2 proclaims, “I will worship toward thy holy [qodesh:H6944] temple [heykal:H1964], and praise thy name for thy lovingkindness and for thy truth: for thou hast magnified thy word above all thy name.”


Another reference to the end of the church age is found in Psalm 79:1, “<<A Psalm of Asaph.>> O God, the heathen are come into thine inheritance; thy holy [qodesh:H6944]  temple [heykal:H1964] have they defiled; they have laid Jerusalem on heaps.”


Lastly Psalm 5:7 makes this affirmation, “But as for me, I will come into thy house in the multitude of thy mercy: and in thy fear will I worship toward thy holy [qodesh:H6944] temple [heykal:H1964].”



They That Observe [shamar:H8104] 


Let’s begin by examining the first Hebrew word in verse eight, which is rendered, “they that observe” (shamar:H8104) in the phrase “they that observe lying vanities…”  The word translated “they that observe” is found over 400 times in the Old Testament, and is most commonly rendered, “keep,” “observe,” and “heed.”  An excellent verse that helps to clarify what God intends by this word is found in verse 5 of Exodus 19:3-6,


“And Moses went up unto God, and the LORD called unto him out of the mountain, saying, Thus shalt thou say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel; {4} Ye have seen what I did unto the Egyptians, and how I bare you on eagles’ wings, and brought you unto myself. {5} Now therefore, if ye will obey my voice indeed, and keep [shamar:H8104] my covenant, then ye shall be a peculiar treasure unto me above all people: for all the earth is mine: {6} And ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests, and an holy nation. These are the words which thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel.”   


God also reiterates this same theme in the New Testament in the following citations:


Titus 2:11-14 declares, “For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men, {12} Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world; {13} Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ; {14} Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.” 


And 1 Peter 2:9 likewise states, “But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into his marvellous light:”


The same Hebrew word also appears in verse 6 of Exodus 20:1-7, as “and keep;” this chapter (like Deuteronomy 5) sets forth the 10 Commandments – a summary of the Law of God – which is the whole Bible:


“And God spake all these words, saying, {2} I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. {3} Thou shalt have no other gods before me. {4} Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth: {5} Thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the LORD thy God am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation of them that hate me; {6} And shewing mercy unto thousands of them that love me, and keep [shamar:H8104] my commandments. {7} Thou shalt not take the name of the LORD thy God in vain; for the LORD will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain [shav`:H7723].”


By the way, I read Exodus 20:7 since the word “in vain” (shav`:H7723) in verse 7 is the same word that is rendered “lying” in Jonah 2:8. The context of what was just read in Exodus 20:1-7 helps us to understand that when one turns from God’s Word or disobeys it they are in a state of  “observ[ing] lying vanities.”


Lying [shav`:H7723]


This word, “lying” (shav`:H7723) appears in 48 citations, some of which are rendered “vanity,”  or “in vain” as these next passages demonstrate:


Psalm 119:37 “Turn away mine eyes from beholding vanity [shav`:H7723]; and quicken thou me in thy way.”


Psalm 127:1-2 “<<A Song of degrees for Solomon.>> Except the LORD build the house, they labour in vain [shav`:H7723] that build it: except the LORD keep the city, the watchman waketh [but] in vain [shav`:H7723]. {2} [It is] vain [shav`:H7723] for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: for so he giveth his beloved sleep.”


In Isaiah 59:1-4 the word “lying” is rendered “lies” in verse 4: “Behold, the LORD’S hand is not shortened, that it cannot save; neither his ear heavy, that it cannot hear: {2} But your iniquities have separated between you and your God, and your sins have hid his face from you, that he will not hear. {3} For your hands are defiled with blood, and your fingers with iniquity; your lips have spoken lies, your tongue hath muttered perverseness. {4} None calleth for justice, nor any pleadeth for truth: they trust in vanity, and speak lies [shav`:H7723]; they conceive mischief, and bring forth iniquity.”


Vanities [shav`:H7723]


The Hebrew word that is rendered “vanities” (hebel:H1892) in Jonah 2:8 surfaces some 70 times in the Old Testament, as the subsequent passages illustrate:


Deuteronomy 32:15-21 is similar to Isaiah 59:1-4, which was just read, and it refers to the “people of God” corporately – as opposed to the elect – who comprise the eternal church: 


“But Jeshurun waxed fat, and kicked: thou art waxen fat, thou art grown thick, thou art covered with fatness; then he forsook God which made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock of his salvation. {16} They provoked him to jealousy with strange gods, with abominations provoked they him to anger.{17} They sacrificed unto devils, not to God; to gods whom they knew not, to new gods that came newly up, whom your fathers feared not. {18} Of the Rock that begat thee thou art unmindful, and hast forgotten God that formed thee. {19} And when the LORD saw it, he abhorred them, because of the provoking of his sons, and of his daughters. {20} And he said, I will hide my face from them, I will see what their end shall be: for they are a very froward generation, children in whom is no faith. {21} They have moved me to jealousy with that which is not God; they have provoked me to anger with their vanities [hebel:H1892]:and I will move them to jealousy with those which are not a people; I will provoke them to anger with a foolish nation. {22} For a fire is kindled in mine anger, and shall burn unto the lowest hell, and shall consume the earth with her increase, and set on fire the foundations of the mountains.”


2 Kings 17:9-15 likewise concurs,  “And the children of Israel did secretly those things that were not right against the LORD their God, and they built them high places in all their cities, from the tower of the watchmen to the fenced city. {10} And they set them up images and groves in every high hill, and under every green tree: {11} And there they burnt incense in all the high places, as did the heathen whom the LORD carried away before them; and wrought wicked things to provoke the LORD to anger: {12} For they served idols, whereof the LORD had said unto them, Ye shall not do this thing.{13} Yet the LORD testified against Israel, and against Judah, by all the prophets, and by all the seers, saying, Turn ye from your evil ways, and keep my commandments and my statutes, according to all the law which I commanded your fathers, and which I sent to you by my servants the prophets. {14} Notwithstanding they would not hear, but hardened their necks, like to the neck of their fathers, that did not believe in the LORD their God. {15} And they rejected his statutes, and his covenant that he made with their fathers, and his testimonies which he testified against them; and they followed vanity [hebel:H1892], and became vain, and went after the heathen that were round about them, concerning whom the LORD had charged them, that they should not do like them.”


Before moving on, I would like to mention that both Hebrew words rendered “lying” (shav`:H7723) and “vanities” (hebel:H1892) are only found together in two other references, besides Jonah 2:8 – namely in Psalm 31:6, and Zechariah 10:2,


Psalm 31:6 reveals, “I have hated them that regard lying [shav`:H7723] vanities [hebel:H1892]: but I trust in the LORD.”


And Zechariah 10:2 affirms, “For the idols have spoken vanity, and the diviners have seen a lie, and have told false [shav`:H7723]  dreams; they comfort in vain [hebel:H1892]: therefore they went their way as a flock, they were troubled, because [there was] no shepherd.”


These two verses also help us gain a better perspective regarding those who are opposed to the kingdom of God and His righteousness (Who is the Lord Jesus Christ). 


In our study of Jonah 2:1-9 we have encountered two great Biblical themes – death and resurrection – in this historical parable that clarifies the significance of Christ’s death and annihilation (which is the payment that God stipulates for sin) at “...the foundation of the world”  in atoning for the sins of His elect people. Keeping that in mind, let us investigate this last phrase in Jonah 2:8, “…forsake their own mercy”


Forsake [`azab:H5800]


The consequences of forsaking God and His Word are set forth in Jeremiah 17:13 for example:


 “O LORD, the hope of Israel, all that forsake [`azab:H5800] thee shall be ashamed, and they that depart from me shall be written in the earth, because they have forsaken [`azab:H5800]  the LORD, the fountain of living waters.” 


Jeremiah 16:9-11 points spiritually to the end of the church age, when God abandoned all the churches and denominations worldwide, and without exception – even as He had divorced Himself  from national Israel when Christ hung on the Cross in AD 33 – never to use them again as His divine organism:


“For thus saith the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel; Behold, I will cause to cease out of this place in your eyes, and in your days, the voice of mirth, and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom, and the voice of the bride. {10} And it shall come to pass, when thou shalt shew this people all these words, and they shall say unto thee, Wherefore hath the LORD pronounced all this great evil against us? or what is our iniquity? or what is our sin that we have committed against the LORD our God? {11} Then shalt thou say unto them, Because your fathers have forsaken [`azab:H5800] me, saith the LORD, and have walked after other gods, and have served them, and have worshipped them, and have forsaken [`azab:H5800] me, and have not kept my law;


Jeremiah 2:11-13 poses this penetrating question: “Hath a nation changed their gods, which are yet no gods? but my people have changed their glory for that which doth not profit. {12} Be astonished, O ye heavens, at this, and be horribly afraid, be ye very desolate, saith the LORD. {13} For my people have committed two evils; they have forsaken [`azab:H5800] me the fountain of living waters, and hewed them out cisterns, broken cisterns, that can hold no water.”


This same theme is also expressed in Isaiah 1:2-4, “Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. {3} The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master’s crib: but Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. {4} Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, a seed of evildoers, children that are corrupters: they have forsaken [`azab:H5800] the LORD, they have provoked the Holy One of Israel unto anger, they are gone away backward.”


Notice in verse three that God is associating “forsaking” with “going backward” - which is the predisposition of the non-elect - whereas the elect are always “moving forward.” The same word, “forsake” (`azab:H5800) is located in two other very familiar verses that we have encountered numerous times in Jonah 2 that again refer to Christ being forsaken and subjected to “corruption,” at “...the foundation of the world,” and then demonstrated in 33 AD, during which His body did not experience any decay whatsoever since He was not bearing sin at that time:


Psalm 16:10 asserts, For thou wilt not leave [`azab:H5800] my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption.”


Psalm 22:1 further acknowledges, “<<To the chief Musician upon Aijeleth Shahar, A Psalm of David.>> My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me [`azab:H5800]? why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my roaring?”


Their Own Mercy [checed:H2617] 


Ultimately, the non-elect are forsaken by God, because they not only trust in “lying vanities” but live out their lives accordingly – although they would not necessarily admit to such. They are simply following the dictates of the flesh, which are summed up in 1 John 2:16-17,


“For all that [is] in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world. {17} And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof: but he that doeth the will of God abideth for ever.


By God’s sheer mercy, His true sheep will never be forsaken, as the following citations testify, in which both Hebrew words rendered “forsake” (`azab:H5800) and “their own mercy” (checed:H2617) in Jonah 2:8 appear together in 7 citations; I will list just three of them, for the sake of time:


Genesis 24:27 testifies, “And he said, Blessed be the LORD God of my master Abraham, who hath not left destitute [`azab:H5800] my master of his mercy [checed:H2617] and his truth: I being in the way, the LORD led me to the house of my master’s brethren.”


Ruth 2:20 also asserts, “And Naomi said unto her daughter in law, Blessed be he of the LORD, who hath not left off [`azab:H5800] his kindness [checed:H2617] to the living and to the dead. And Naomi said unto her, The man is near of kin unto us, one of our next kinsmen.”


And Ezra 9:9 maintains, “For we [were] bondmen; yet our God hath not forsaken [`azab:H5800] us in our bondage, but hath extended mercy [checed:H2617] unto us in the sight of the kings of Persia, to give us a reviving, to set up the house of our God, and to repair the desolations thereof, and to give us a wall in Judah and in Jerusalem.”


Let’s stop here today, and, Lord willing next Sunday, we will investigate verse 9.




 

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 19

May 12, 2019


This is Part 19 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is May 12, 2019. We have taken a detour in our examination of this doctrine in order to consider how Jonah 2, which is a historical parable, points very directly to this doctrine. Let’s read this prayer of Jonah again in Jonah 2:1-9,


“Then Jonah prayed unto the LORD his God out of the fish’s belly, {2} And said, I cried by reason of mine affliction unto the LORD, and he heard me; out of the belly of hell cried I, and thou heardest my voice. {3} For thou hadst cast me into the deep, in the midst of the seas; and the floods compassed me about: all thy billows and thy waves passed over me. {4} Then I said, I am cast out of thy sight; yet I will look again toward thy holy temple. {5} The waters compassed me about, even to the soul: the depth closed me round about, the weeds were wrapped about my head. {6} I went down to the bottoms of the mountains; the earth with her bars [was] about me for ever: yet hast thou brought up my life from corruption, O LORD my God. {7} When my soul fainted within me I remembered the LORD: and my prayer came in unto thee, into thine holy temple. {8} They that observe lying vanities forsake their own mercy. {9} But I will sacrifice unto thee with the voice of thanksgiving; I will pay that that I have vowed. Salvation is of the LORD.”



But I Will Sacrifice [zabach:H2076] 


Let’s now consider the first Hebrew word in verse 9: “But I will sacrifice…” (zabach:H2076) The idea of sacrifice has to be understood very, very carefully, as it can easily lead one into what can be termed a “works gospel” or what is even more insidious, a “works-grace” gospel – cleverly combining God’s grace with human efforts. However, if we are referring to the sacrifice of Christ – based on His efforts alone, and His faith alone, and His righteousness alone – then we can stand firmly on solid Biblical ground. Keep in mind that God did require sacrifices in the Old Testament with scrupulously strict guidelines – and all those sacrifices pointed to the Lord Jesus Christ – in His perfect, holy, atoning work – which occurred at “...the foundation of the world,”  that we are privileged to be a part of, if indeed we have been privileged to become a citizen of the Kingdom of God – as one of the “heirs of God, and joint-heirs with Christ…” as Romans 8:17 attests. Let’s take a look at how God uses this term throughout the Old Testament:


Exodus 22:20 solemnly stipulates: He that sacrificeth [zabach:H2076] unto [any] god, save unto the LORD only, he shall be utterly destroyed.”


In 2 Kings 17:35-36 this word is repeated in both verses: “With whom the LORD had made a covenant, and charged them, saying, Ye shall not fear other gods, nor bow yourselves to them, nor serve them, nor sacrifice [zabach:H2076] to them: {36} But the LORD, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt with great power and a stretched out arm, him shall ye fear, and him shall ye worship, and to him shall ye do sacrifice [zabach:H2076].”


Psalm 54:6 also maintains: “I will freely sacrifice [zabach:H2076] unto thee: I will praise thy name, O LORD; for it is good.”


As I mentioned previously, the only sacrifice that God is concerned with is the sacrifice that His Son, the Lord Jesus Christ made – typified by all the Old Testament sacrifices – which required the shedding of blood (or the taking of one’s life) going all the way back to the Garden of Eden, as we read in Genesis 3:21,


“Unto Adam also and to his wife did the LORD God make coats of skins, and clothed them.”


Unto Thee With The Voice [kole:H6963] Of Thanksgiving [towdah:H8426]


In Jonah 2:9, the sacrifice that God has in view is the “voice of thanksgiving,”  exemplified perfectly by the Savior, which true believers are to emulate. These two Hebrew words are found together in only five other verses, besides Jonah 2:9. The following are just a few examples:


Psalm 26:6-7 maintains, “I will wash mine hands in innocency: so will I compass thine altar, O LORD: {7} That I may publish with the voice [kole:H6963] of thanksgiving [towdah:H8426], and tell of all thy wondrous works.”


In Psalm 42:4, the word for “thanksgiving” is rendered “praise”: “When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice [kole:H6963] of joy and praise [towdah:H8426], with a multitude that kept holyday.”


Lastly, Isaiah 51:3 acknowledges, “For the LORD shall comfort Zion: he will comfort all her waste places; and he will make her wilderness like Eden, and her desert like the garden of the LORD; joy and gladness shall be found therein, thanksgiving [towdah:H8426], and the voice [kole:H6963] of melody.”


I Will Pay [shalam:H7999]  [That] That I Have Vowed [nadar:H5087]


Once again, the phrase that is translated “I will pay [that] that I have vowed,” is comprised of two Hebrew words, which appear six other times together, besides Jonah 2:9, as the subsequent passages reveal: 


Deuteronomy 23:21 provides this directive: When thou shalt vow [nadar:H5087] a vow unto the LORD thy God, thou shalt not slack to pay [shalam:H7999] it: for the LORD thy God will surely require it of thee; and it would be sin in thee.”

 

In 2 Samuel 5:7, Absalom uses a presumed vow to initiate a plan to overthrow his father David, and make himself  king: “And it came to pass after forty years, that Absalom said unto the king, I pray thee, let me go and pay [shalam:H7999]  my vow, which I have vowed [nadar:H5087] unto the LORD, in Hebron.”


Psalm 76:11 instructs, Vow [nadar:H5087], and pay [shalam:H7999]  unto the LORD your God: let all that be round about him bring presents unto him that ought to be feared.”


Ecclesiastes 5:4-5 likewise commands, When thou vowest [nadar:H5087]  a vow unto God, defer not to pay [shalam:H7999] it; for he hath no pleasure in fools: pay [shalam:H7999] that which thou hast vowed [nadar:H5087]. {5} Better is it that thou shouldest not vow [nadar:H5087], than that thou shouldest vow [nadar:H5087] and not pay [shalam:H7999].”


And Isaiah 19:21 declares,  “And the LORD shall be known to Egypt, and the Egyptians shall know the LORD in that day, and shall do sacrifice and oblation; yea, they shall vow [nadar:H5087] a vow unto the LORD, and perform [shalam:H7999] it.”


What Is The Vow (Or Oath) That Jonah (Symbolizing Christ) Vowed


The same word “vow” (nadar:H5087) that we have been considering in the preceding verses and in Jonah 2:9, also appears in Genesis 31:13, in which God is addressing Jacob, and reminding him of the vow which he had previously taken in Bethel (which means “the house of God”) many years earlier:


“I [am ]the God of Bethel, where thou anointedst the pillar, [and ]where thou vowedst [nadar:H5087] a vow unto me: now arise, get thee out from this land, and return unto the land of thy kindred.”


Genesis 28:20-22 pinpoints the vow that Jacob made, and which God makes reference to, pointing to spiritual “bread” and spiritual “raiment” - pertaining to both the “Bread of Life” as well as “the robe of Christ’s Righteousness”:


“And Jacob vowed [nadar:H5087] a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, {21} So that I come again to my father’s house in peace; then shall the LORD be my God: {22} And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God’s house: and of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.”


These two items - “food” and “raiment” are also in view in 1 Timothy 6:8,


“And having food [diatrophe:G1305] and raiment [skepasma:G4629] let us be therewith content.”  


In actuality, Jacob was merely repeating what God had already promised him beforehand in verses 13-15; God allowed Jacob to dream a dream, in which God appeared to Jacob and gave him this wonderful promise:


“And, behold, the LORD stood above it, and said, I am the LORD God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac: the land whereon thou liest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed; {14} And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth, and thou shalt spread abroad to the west, and to the east, and to the north, and to the south: and in thee and in thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed. {15} And, behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou goest, and will bring thee again into this land; for I will not leave thee, until I have done that which I have spoken to thee of.”


Please bear in mind that this promise was given to Abraham and Isaac as well – underscoring the blessing that is a result of the work of the Messiah – as Hebrews 11:8-10 underscore,


“By faith Abraham, when he was called to go out into a place which he should after receive for an inheritance, obeyed; and he went out, not knowing whither he went. {9} By faith he sojourned in the land of promise, as [in] a strange country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs with him of the same promise: {10} For he looked for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker [is] God.”


Under divine inspiration, Zacharias – the father of John the Baptist – uttered the same prophecy in Luke 1:68-75,


“Blessed be the Lord God of Israel; for he hath visited and redeemed his people, {69} And hath raised up an horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David; {70} As he spake by the mouth of his holy prophets, which have been since the world began: {71} That we should be saved from our enemies, and from the hand of all that hate us; {72} To perform the mercy promised to our fathers, and to remember his holy covenant; {73} The oath [herkos:G3727] which he sware to our father Abraham,{74} That he would grant unto us, that we being delivered out of the hand of our enemies might serve him without fear, {75} In holiness and righteousness before him, all the days of our life.”


The Bible makes reference to the “oath,” or “promise,” or “covenant,” or “testament” which have to do with God having obligated Himself to save a people for Himself to be His Bride – His eternal Church – His Body, as Hebrews 6:13-20 sets forth so beautifully:


“For when God made promise to Abraham, because he could swear by no greater, he sware by himself, {14} Saying, Surely blessing I will bless thee, and multiplying I will multiply thee. {15}  And so, after he had patiently endured, he obtained the promise.{16}  For men verily swear by the greater: and an oath for confirmation is to them an end of all strife.{17} Wherein God, willing more abundantly to shew unto the heirs of promise the immutability of his counsel, confirmed it by an oath:{18} That by two immutable things, in which it was impossible for God to lie, we might have a strong consolation, who have fled for refuge to lay hold upon the hope set before us: {19}  Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil; {20} Whither the forerunner is for us entered, even Jesus, made an high priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec.”


With regard to Christ – “an high priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec” – Hebrews 9:14-17 provides further confirmation that the atonement took place before Creation – not in 33 AD – which was merely a demonstration of what had occurred at “...the foundation of the world,” which we will be examining in greater detail in a future study shortly, Lord willing:


“How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? {15} And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions that were under the first testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance. {16} For where a testament [or will] is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. {17} For a testament [or will] is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.”


As you can see, this matter of the “vow” or “oath” that Christ promised to maintain to the tee, is of eternal significance as we will now see, as we consider the last five words of Jonah 2:9, “Salvation is of the LORD.”


Salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] [is] of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]


The phrase rendered “Salvation [is] of the LORD” is actually comprised of two Hebrew words: “salvation” (yeshuwah:H3444) and “of  Jehovah” (Yehovah:H3068). Without a doubt, it is an enormously important declaration, as we shall see. 


Salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] 


This particular Hebrew word is used 78 times in the Old Testament in the following ways: “salvation,” “help,” “deliverance,” “health,” “save,” “saving,” and “welfare.” Let’s examine how God uses this word to further understand what God wants us to learn about the topic of God’s salvation – and we must bear this is mind – this is God’s salvation altogether; it is not man’s, nor man’s interpretation of what he thinks God’s salvation should be. This is God’s domain entirely – it has everything to do with His will alone, as we learn from a passage like John 1:12-13, which reveals,


“But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name: {13} Which were born, not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God.” 


Waiting For Salvation


In Genesis 49:18 we read, I have waited [qavah:H06960] for thy salvation [yeshuwah:H3444], O LORD.” 


One of the key elements of God’s salvation - during the day of salvation -  is that it was contingent on God’s timing altogether – not on man’s. The element of waiting could have been frustrating to one who was not one of God’s elect, because it put one in a position of uncertainty, and that is uncomfortable to many. But for God’s elect, it is the best place to be spiritually, because one was forced to depend on God – to trust Him completely, as the following passages testify so clearly:


Lamentations 3:25-26 assert, “The LORD is good unto them that wait [qavah:H6960] for him, to the soul that seeketh him. {26} It is good that a man should both hope and quietly wait [duwmam:H1748] for the salvation [teshuw`ah:H4668] of the LORD.”


In like manner, Isaiah 25:9 declares, “And it shall be said in that day, Lo, this is our God; we have waited [qavah:H6960] for him, and he will save us: this is the LORD; we have waited [qavah:H6960] for him, we will be glad and rejoice in his salvation. [yeshuwah:H3444]”


Psalm 25:5 similarly acknowledges: “Lead me in thy truth, and teach me: for thou art the God of my salvation; on thee do I wait [qavah:H6960]all the day.”


The Principle Of “Stand Still And See”


Exodus 14:13 makes this amazing proclamation, as the Israelites were getting ready to cross the Red Sea at God’s command, under Moses’ direction. Clearly the battle belongs to the LORD – as did salvation – God did not require any human intervention whatsoever:


“And Moses said unto the people, Fear ye not, stand still [yatsab:H3320], and see [ra’ah:H7200] the salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] of the LORD, which he will shew to you to day: for the Egyptians whom ye have seen to day, ye shall see them again no more for ever.”


2 Chronicles 20:17 is a strikingly similar account: “Ye shall not need to fight in this battle: set [yatsab:H3320] yourselves, stand ye [still], and see [ra’ah:H7200] the salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] of the LORD with you, O Judah and Jerusalem: fear not, nor be dismayed; to morrow go out against them: for the LORD will be with you.”


Trust In God Alone


One can only trust God completely with regards to His salvation – which is based upon the faith and work of Christ entirely – when God has given that individual eternal life in their soul – which He did by means of His Word, according to these next references:   


Psalm 13:5 declares, But I have trusted [batach:H0982] in thy mercy; my heart shall rejoice in thy salvation [yeshuwah:H3444].”


Speaking of the vast majority of the Israelites in the wilderness, Psalm 78:22 recounts: “Because they believed not in God, and trusted [batach:H0982] not in his salvation [yeshuwah:H3444]:


Isaiah 12:2 makes this glorious proclamation: “Behold, God [is] my salvation [yeshuwah:H3444]; I will trust [batach:H0982], and not be afraid: for the LORD JEHOVAH is my strength and my song; he also is become my salvation.”


God’s Salvation Is Based On Christ’s Righteousness Alone


The true salvation program that is found throughout the Old and New Testaments in uniquely God’s, and is based exclusively on the righteousness of Christ alone; in other words there is no human effort or work attached to it – it is solely the work and faith of the Lord Jesus Christ. Anything other than that, represents a works gospel or a works/grace, both of which are not only incapable of producing salvation, but are a trap that leads their followers to death and annihilation. The subsequent verses highlight the importance of Christ’s righteousness alone:


God insists in Isaiah 51:6 and 8, “Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath: for the heavens shall vanish away like smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they that dwell therein shall die in like manner: but my salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] shall be for ever, and my righteousness [tsadaqah:H6666] shall not be abolished… {8}“For the moth shall eat them up like a garment, and the worm shall eat them like wool: but my righteousness [tsadaqah:H6666] shall be for ever, and my salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] from generation to generation.”


Underscoring why God’s program is structured solely on Christ’s righteousness, Isaiah 59:16-17 provides this amazing declaration: “And he [Christ] saw that [there was] no man, and wondered that there was no intercessor: therefore his arm brought salvation unto him; and his righteousness [tsadaqah:H6666], it sustained him. {17} For he put on righteousness [tsadaqah:H6666] as a breastplate, and an helmet of salvation [yeshuwah:H3444]  upon his head; and he put on the garments of vengeance for clothing, and was clad with zeal as a cloke.”


God Heard And Answered The Prayers Of His Elect For Salvation


In Psalm 34:15, one discovers a very comforting truth: “The eyes of the LORD are upon the righteous, and his ears are open unto their cry.” Wonderfully, those that God has elected to salvation have the privilege of crying out to him for all their needs – and their greatest need was the need for spiritual rebirth, as these next passages emphasize:


Psalm 118:21 acknowledges, “I will praise thee: for thou hast heard me [’anah:H6030], and art become my salvation [yeshuwah:H3444].”


Isaiah 49:8 also adds, “Thus saith the LORD, In an acceptable time have I heard [’anah:H6030] thee, and in a day of salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] have I helped thee: and I will preserve thee, and give thee for a covenant of the people, to establish the earth, to cause to inherit the desolate heritages;”


Of Jehovah [Yehovah:H3068]


The last Hebrew word that we are considering in today’s study is “of the LORD” or “of Jehovah,” (Jehovah:H3068) which is found 6519 times in the Old Testament! When coupled with the word “salvation,” (yeshuwah:H3444), these two terms appear together in 30 verses. Let’s take a look at how God utilizes these two words together:


In Psalm 3:8 we learn, Salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] [belongeth] unto the LORD [Jehovah:H3068]: thy blessing [Berakah:H1293] is upon thy people. Selah.”


Please note that in Psalm 133:3, God defines what the blessing is – and this is the identical word for blessing found in Psalm 3:8 – it is everlasting life – which is salvation:


“As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the LORD commanded the blessing [Berakah:H1293], [even] life [chay:H2416] for evermore.” 


Psalm 96:2 underscores both the proclamation of the Gospel as well as the worship of its Divine Author in song: “Sing unto the LORD [Jehovah:H3068], bless his name; shew forth his salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] from day to day.”


In Psalm 98:2, God associates His salvation with His righteousness: The LORD [Jehovah:H3068] hath made known his salvation [yeshuwah:H3444]: his righteousness hath he openly shewed in the sight of the heathen.”


Psalm 106:4 is a heartfelt plea, reminiscent of the one uttered by the thief on the cross, on Jesus’ right hand: “Remember me, O LORD [Jehovah:H3068 , with the favour that thou bearest unto thy people: O visit me with thy salvation [yeshuwah:H3444];”




Psalm 149:4  pinpoints God’s attitude toward His elect people, and how they are adorned with His spiritual attire: For the LORD [Jehovah:H3068] taketh pleasure in his people: he will beautify the meek with salvation [yeshuwah:H3444].”


Lastly Isaiah 12:2 triumphantly extols, “Behold, God [is] my salvation [yeshuwah:H3444] ; I will trust, and not be afraid: for the LORD JEHOVAH [Jehovah:H3068] is my strength and my song; he also is become my salvation [yeshuwah:H3444].”


Today’s study will end the detour we have taken into Jonah 2. Lord willing, in our next study, we will consider the profound subject of the “death of the Testator,” as well as the mysterious priest, Melchisedec, and see how these two subjects intersect with our study of The Lamb Slain From The Foundation of The World.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 20

May 26, 2019


This is Part 20 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is May 26, 2019. Allow me to recap what we have discovered thus far in this series:



  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world,” since others were raised from the dead prior to the Crucifixion in 33 AD.
  4. Christ was indeed “poured out” or “offered up” or “melted” - terms that vividly portray annihilation - which He voluntarily subjected Himself to in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world.”
  5. When Christ rose from death and annihilation “...from the foundation of the world,” He received the title, “Son of God.” 
  6. Christ is also the “first of the firstfruits” in addition to being the “birthright, both of which are related to Him being the “firstborn from the dead.” 
  7. Jonah 2 is a historical parable related to Christ under God's wrath at the foundation of the world. In that chapter we discovered 5 sets of English words (but 10 different Hebrew words) that God employs:“belly,” “cried,” “heard,” “compassed/closed me round about,” and “prayed/prayer.” The number 5 points spiritually to either salvation or judgment (as in this case) and the sequence of these dual terms highlight the atonement, "...at the foundation of the world, " as well as the demonstration in 33 AD. These 5 terms themselves also reflect an upward "pattern" of deliverance from the grave  to resurrection. 


Today I would like to explore another passage which further confirms what we have been learning about the atonement at “... the foundation of the world.” We will be considering the “death of the testator” in verses 16-17 of Hebrews 9, 

 

“For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. {17} For a testament is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.” 


We can understand that what is in view here is a legal document, as it were. Just as in our present day, if somebody leaves a will or “last testament,” the beneficiaries named in the will can only receive the inheritance, once the maker of the will or “testator,” dies. Upon his death, the will goes into effect, and the inheritance is divided up, if there are multiple beneficiaries. By contrast, there is an interesting account in the parable of the prodigal son, in which the prodigal wants “his share,” before the father actually dies; we read about this in Luke 15:11-12, 


“And he said, A certain man had two sons: {12} And the younger of them said to [his] father, Father, give me the portion [meros:G3313] of goods [ousia:G3776] that falleth [to me]. And he divided unto them [his] living.”


By Old Testament law, the elder son was to receive the “double portion,” (a spiritual reference to the Lord Jesus Christ) as we learn from Deuteronomy 21:17, reminding us of another set of brothers (actually twins) -  Esau (the elder), and Jacob (the younger) -  in which Jacob received the eternal inheritance (typified by the “birthright” as well as the “blessing”) and Esau did not:


“But he shall acknowledge the son of the hated [for] the firstborn, by giving him a double portion of all that he hath: for he [is] the beginning of his strength; the right of the firstborn [is] his.”   


For [gar:G1063] Where [hopou:G3699]


The first two words in Hebrews 9:16 are: “For where,” and these two terms appear together in seven other citations. Curiously, most of these passages exhibit a “cause and effect” relationship, as we find here in Hebrews 9:16.  Here are some illustrations:


Matthew 6:21 (and its counterpart, Luke 12:34) declare: “For [gar:G1063]  where [hopou:G3699] your treasure is, there will your heart be also.”


Matthew 24:28 similarly testifies: “For [gar:G1063] wheresoever [ean:G1437 / hopou:G3699] the carcase is, there will the eagles be gathered together.”


James 3:16 also acknowledges: For [gar:G1063] where [hopou:G3699]  envying and strife [is], there [is] confusion and every evil work.”


A Testament [diatheke:G1242]


The term, “a testament,” is found 33 times, 20 times as “covenant,” and 13 times as “testament,” and points to the Gospel. This is explained in some detail with regard to the Old “covenant” (with Israel in view) as well as the New (concerning the churches and denominations), and then finally a “third” covenant if you will, which has to do with the completion of the Body of Christ on May 21, 2011, as we read in Hebrews 8:6-11, in which the term, “covenant,” appears five times:


“But now hath he obtained a more excellent ministry, by how much also he is the mediator of a better covenant [diatheke:G1242], which was established upon better promises. {7} For if that first [covenant] had been faultless, then should no place have been sought for the second. {8} For finding fault with them, [Israel first,  and the  the churches and denominations, second] he saith, Behold, the days come, saith the Lord, when I will make a new covenant [diatheke:G1242] with the house of Israel and with the house of Judah: {9} Not according to the covenant [diatheke:G1242] that I made with their fathers in the day when I took them by the hand to lead them out of the land of Egypt; because they continued not in my covenant [diatheke:G1242], and I regarded them not, saith the Lord. {10} For this [is] the covenant [diatheke:G1242] that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people: {11} And they shall not teach every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest.”


Please note that the phrase in verse 11, “for all shall know me” is indicating that all within the Bride of Christ (fulfilled on May 21, 2011) have become saved, thus eradicating the need to teach about salvation, since that “Great Commission” ended on May 21, 2011. Those who insists that there should be no teachers teaching at all, however, are missing the mark in this regard.


There Must Also Of Necessity [anagke:G318]


The next word that we want to examine in Hebrews 9:16 is: “there must also of necessity,” which also serves to strengthen the cause and effect relationship in this verse. The following verses from Hebrews are especially germane to our study, as Christ’s role as High Priest is being discussed; Lord willing, this will also tie into the account of Melchizedek, which I plan on addressing, after our present examination of the “death of the testator.” 


Hebrews 7:12 and 27 maintain: “For the priesthood being changed, there is made of necessity [anagke:G318] a change also of the law. ... {27} Who needeth [echo:G2192 / anagke:G318] not daily, as those high priests, to offer up sacrifice, first for his own sins, and then for the people's: for this he did once, when he offered up himself.”


In the middle of a discussion regarding “the shedding of blood,” and the superiority of Christ giving up His “blood” (or “life”) “...at the foundation of the world,” Hebrews 9:23 states: “[It was] therefore necessary [anagke:G318] that the patterns of things in the heavens should be purified with these; but the heavenly things themselves with better sacrifices than these.”


The Death [thanatos:G2288] Of The Testator [diatithemi:G1303]


Next we want to investigate the last two Greek terms in Hebrews 9:16, namely, the “death of the testator,” which is the focus of this passage, and since these two words only appear together here, we will need to explore them individually, and I’ll start with “of the testator” first:


Of The Testator [diatithemi:G1303]


Besides Hebrews 9:16-17, this term only emerges again in the following four citations, in which it is rendered as “make,” “testator,” and “appoint.” It is significant that this word is the root word from which the word “covenant” (diatheke:G1242) is derived from. 


In Luke 22:29 it is rendered as a form of “appoint” twice: “And I appoint [diatithemi:G1303] unto you a kingdom, as my Father hath appointed [diatithemi:G1303] unto me;”


Acts 3:25 translates this word as “made,” and please note the inclusion of the root or “parent” word “covenant” that was discussed earlier: “Ye are the children of the prophets, and of the covenant [diatheke:G1242] which God made [diatithemi:G1303] with our fathers, saying unto Abraham, And in thy seed shall all the kindreds of the earth be blessed.”


We see both words in view again in Hebrews 8:10-12, “For this [is] the covenant [diatithemi:G1303] that I will make [diatithemi:G1303] with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people: {11} And they shall not teach every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest. {12} For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their iniquities will I remember no more.”


This is also the case in Hebrews 10:16-17 which is a re-statement of Hebrews 8:10-12 This [is] the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; {17} And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. ”


Both Hebrews 8:10-12 and Hebrews 10:16-17 are quoting Jeremiah 31:31-34, which is a prophecy pointing to the completion of the Body of Christ on May 21, 2011; I want to remind you that this is another “word bridge” between these Old and New Testament passages, which would bear more spiritual insight by comparing the identical words in each of them:


“Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel, and with the house of Judah: {32} Not according to the covenant that I made with their fathers in the day [that] I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt; which my covenant they brake, although I was an husband unto them, saith the LORD: {33} But this [shall be] the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel; After those days, saith the LORD, I will put my law in their inward parts, and write it in their hearts; and will be their God, and they shall be my people. {34} And they shall teach no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the LORD: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the LORD: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.”


In turn, Jeremiah 31:31-34 also relates to at least two other references: Ezekiel 36:37-38, and Ezekiel 37:4-6, having to do with the principle of “knowing (or “experiencing”) the LORD” with respect to God’s elect, but also with regard to the non-elect, who “know” or “experience” God’s wrath when it falls upon them:


I will also include Ezekiel 36:24-28 which is a magnificent spiritual portrait of God’s salvation program when it was still in operation, along with verses 37-38; (notice the 10 personal pronouns “I”): “For I will take you from among the heathen, and gather you out of all countries, and will bring you into your own land. {25} Then will I sprinkle clean water upon you, and ye shall be clean: from all your filthiness, and from all your idols, will I cleanse you. {26} A new heart also will I give you, and a new spirit will I put within you: and I will take away the stony heart out of your flesh, and I will give you an heart of flesh. {27} And I will put my spirit within you, and cause you to walk in my statutes, and ye shall keep my judgments, and do [them]. {28} And ye shall dwell in the land that I gave to your fathers; and ye shall be my people, and I will be your God....{36} Thus saith the Lord GOD; I will yet [for] this be enquired of by the house of Israel, to do [it] for them; I will increase them with men like a flock. {38} As the holy flock, as the flock of Jerusalem in her solemn feasts; so shall the waste cities be filled with flocks of men: and they shall know that I [am] the LORD.”


And Ezekiel 37:4-6 reveal: “Again he said unto me, Prophesy upon these bones, and say unto them, O ye dry bones, hear the word of the LORD. {5} Thus saith the Lord GOD unto these bones; Behold, I will cause breath to enter into you, and ye shall live: {6} And I will lay sinews upon you, and will bring up flesh upon you, and cover you with skin, and put breath in you, and ye shall live; and ye shall know that I [am] the LORD.”


The term, “the death,” referring to “...the death of the testator,” can only be speaking of Christ’s atonement “...at the foundation of the world,” because it was His death which allowed the “testament” or “will” to go into effect, and that could not having taken place in 33 AD, because one for thing He was not bearing sin at that time, and secondly, it would have excluded all the other elect who had lived prior to 33 AD; I’ll read Hebrews 9:16-17 again, 


“For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. {17} For a testament is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.” 


For now, I would like to move on to verse 17, and then return to the word, “death” (thanatos:G2288), after we discuss verse 17.


We have already looked at the terms, “For” (gar:G1063) and “a testament” (diatheke:G1242), so let’s now consider the word, “is of force”  (bebaios:G949).


Is Of Force [bebaios:G949]


This expression, “is of force,” is only rendered this way here in Hebrews 9:17; it is more commonly translated as “sure,” or “stedfast,” as these next citations illustrate, but since this is speaking of a “will” or “testament,” we can understand why the translators chose to render it this way, given the context.


Hebrews 3:6 and 14 declare: “But Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we, if we hold fast the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm [bebaios:G949] unto the end. ... {14} For we are made partakers of Christ, if we hold the beginning of our confidence stedfast [bebaios:G949] unto the end;”


2 Peter 1:10 renders this term as “sure”: “Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure [bebaios:G949]: for if ye do these things, ye shall never fall:”


After [epi:G1909] Men Are Dead [nekros:G3498]


The phrase, “after men are dead” explains the timing of when the “will” or  “testament” went into effect. The word, “men are dead” (nekros:G3498) is a term that is commonly found in the New Testament, and is always translated as “dead,” as these next verses show:


Acts 13:34 teaches: “And as concerning that he raised him up from the dead [nekros:G3498], [now] no more to return to corruption, he said on this wise, I will give you the sure mercies of David.”


And Acts 17:31 makes this proclamation: “Because he hath appointed a day, in the which he will judge the world in righteousness by [that] man whom he hath ordained; [whereof] he hath given assurance unto all [men], in that he hath raised him from the dead.” [nekros:G3498]


Revelation 1:5 is a marvelous affirmation that Christ is indeed “the first begotten of the dead,” pointing to His resurrection, “...at the foundation of the world”: “And from Jesus Christ, [who is] the faithful witness, [and] the first begotten of the dead [nekros:G3498], and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood,”


That brings us to the last phrase in Hebrews 9:17, “otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth,” but we will have to wait until next Sunday to explore that.

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 21

June 2, 2019


This is Part 21 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is June 2, 2019.  In our last study we began examining the “death of the testator” in verses 16-17 of Hebrews 9 which state: 

 

“For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. {17} For a testament is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.” 


I received a question last week concerning what I had mentioned in Part 20 regarding the parable of the “Prodigal Son” in relation to Jacob and Esau, as well as the example of the “double portion,” as revealed in Deuteronomy 21:17; clarification was needed as to how “the death of the testator” might correlate to the “Prodigal Son.” I appreciate this kind of feedback because there are probably others who might be wondering about this, even though they did not verbalize their question. 


  1. The only reason I brought up the parable of the “Prodigal Son,” was to merely illustrate the unusual circumstance in which the inheritance was given to the younger son while the father was still alive. Some might attempt to use this as an argument against the necessity of the “death of the testator” taking place before the inheritance could be granted, but that idea has no basis elsewhere in Scripture.  Please note that we do not read that the elder brother received his share - which would have been the “double portion” -  that Deuteronomy 21:17 alludes to. Because the elder brother did not receive his inheritance at the same time that the younger brother did shows that this is not the focus of this parable. The main focus of this parable is at least twofold in nature. One, it has to do with salvation, during the day of salvation. Secondly, it reveals the “spectrum” of sin nature. What I mean by this is that God is utilizing each brother in this parable to highlight two “extremes” with regard to sin nature. The “father” is representative of God Himself. The elder brother exemplifies those who are desperately trying to keep the Law of God, as he admits in Luke 15:28-30,


“And he was angry, and would not go in: therefore came his father out, and intreated him. {29} And he answering said to [his] father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends: {30} But as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.”


The younger son - the prodigal - at the opposite end of the spectrum, typifies those who wholeheartedly engage in sin as much as possible, without any thought for the consequences of doing so. Obviously both are at fault according to James 2:10 and Romans 6:23a respectively:


“For whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one [point], he is guilty of all.” 


“For the wages of sin [is] death…” 


  1. I also mentioned Esau and Jacob - two other (twin) brothers in this case - who similarly relate to “the prodigal and the elder brother” and serve to illustrate the fact that the younger of the two (Jacob) received the “birthright”  as well as the “blessing,” which normally would have gone to the elder brother or “firstborn,” as Deuteronomy 21:17 maintains:


“But he shall acknowledge the son of the hated [for] the firstborn, by giving him a double portion of all that he hath: for he [is] the beginning of his strength; the right of the firstborn [is] his.” 

  1. With respect to the full significance of the  “death of the testator” and the prodigal son receiving the inheritance before the father’s death, I don’t see a “tie-in,”  except with the fact that both brothers represent two opposing facets of sin nature and of course the Lord Jesus “became” sin at the foundation of the world, on behalf of each of the elect, and thus had to die and being annihilated, (and rise again), as we read in 2 Corinthians 5:21,


“For he [God the Father] hath made him [God the Son] [to be] sin for us [the elect], who [God the Son] knew no sin; that we [the elect] might be made the righteousness of God in him.[God the Son] 


With that in mind, let us continue where we left off  last week, at the last half of verse 17, “...otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.” 


Otherwise [epei:G1893] It Is Of [ischyo:G2480] No [mepote:G3379] Strength [ischyo:G2480] At All [mepote:G3379] 


The phrase, “...it is of no strength at all…”  is being contrasted  with the previous phrase, “is of force after men are dead.”  This phrase, “it is of no strength at all” is actually comprised of two Greek words, “it is of strength” (ischyo:G2480) and “no, at all” (mepote:G3379), and these two words are only found in one exceedingly important reference in verse 29 of Luke 14:28-30,


“For which of you, intending to build a tower, sitteth not down first, and counteth the cost, whether he have [sufficient] to finish [it]? {29} Lest haply [mepote:G3379], after he hath laid the foundation [themelios:G2310], and is [ischyo:G2480]  not able [ischyo:G2480]  to finish [it], all that behold [it] begin to mock him, {30} Saying, This man began to build, and was not able to finish.” 





The Foundation [themelios:G2310] 


The word that is rendered, “the foundation” in Luke 14:29 appears in 1 Corinthians 3:11-15, which speaks of Christ being “the foundation” in verses 11and 12, 


“For other foundation [themelios:G2310] can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ. {12} Now if any man build upon this foundation [themelios:G2310] gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; {13} Every man's work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what sort it is. {14} If any man's work abide which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward. {15} If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire.” 


The following passages also reveal how God uses this same word, “foundation,” elsewhere: 


Ephesians 2:20 affirms: “And are built upon the foundation [themelios:G2310]  of the apostles and prophets, Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner [stone];”


2 Timothy 2:19 likewise asserts: “Nevertheless the foundation [themelios:G2310]  of God standeth sure, having this seal, The Lord knoweth them that are his. And, Let every one that nameth the name of Christ depart from iniquity.”


Speaking of Abraham (as well as the patriarchs, Isaac and Jacob)  Hebrews 11:10 maintains: “For he looked for a city which hath foundations [themelios:G2310] , whose builder and maker [is] God”



It is nothing short of amazing to consider that this phrase in Hebrews 9:17, “...it is of no strength at all…” in the context of the “death of the testator” brings us right back to Christ being the only “foundation” for salvation. 


While [hote:G3753] The Testator[diatithemi:G1303] Liveth [zao:G2198]


The last phrase in Hebrews 9:17 is: “...while the testator liveth,” again emphasizes the necessity for the death of the testator, in order for the recipients of the will to receive their eternal inheritance. It consists of three words that only surface together in this verse, so we will have to discuss them separately. 


While [hote:G3753] 


The term, “while” is only found translated this way one other time, in John 17:2, 


While [hote:G3753] I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.”


Most of the time, this word G3753 is rendered as “when,” as these next passages describe:


We find it for example in Luke 15:30, concerning the lifestyle of the “prodigal” by his  elder brother, in which it is expressed as, “as soon as”: “But as soon as [hote:G3753] this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.”


Luke 17:22 translates it as “when,” with regard to our present day of judgment:“And he said unto the disciples, The days will come, when [hote:G3753] ye shall desire to see one of the days of the Son of man, and ye shall not see [it].”


This is also the case in John 9:4, in which it is found again as “when” (incidentally, “while” in this verse is a different word): “I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when [hote:G3753]  no man can work.”


Underscoring our present day once again, Revelation 10:10-11 translates this as “as soon as”: “And I took the little book out of the angel's hand, and ate it up; and it was in my mouth sweet as honey: and as soon as [hote:G3753]  I had eaten it, my belly was bitter. {11} And he said unto me, Thou must prophesy again before many peoples, and nations, and tongues, and kings.”


Lastly, 1 Peter 3:20 expresses this as “when”: “Which sometime were disobedient, when [hote:G3753] once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water.”


The Testator [diatithemi:G1303]


Since we have already discussed the term, “testator,” last week, I won’t go over those verses again, except to remind you (and me) that this word, “the testator” only emerges again in four other citations, in which it is rendered as “make,” “testator,” and “appoint.”  Moreover, it is highly significant that this word is the root word from which the terms “covenant” or “testament” (diatheke:G1242)  is derived from, and the terms, “covenant” or “testament”  are synonymous with the Gospel, or salvation.


Liveth [zao:G2198]


The word, “living,” emerges in the following significant passages which relate to our subject at hand: 


Romans 6:10 reveals “For in that he died, he died unto sin once: but in that he liveth [zao:G2198], he liveth [zao:G2198] unto God.”


Romans  7:1-4 also stipulates: “Know ye not, brethren, (for I speak to them that know the law,) how that the law hath dominion over a man as long as he liveth? [zao:G2198] {2} For the woman which hath an husband is bound by the law to [her] husband so long as he liveth [zao:G2198]; but if the husband be dead, she is loosed from the law of [her] husband. {3} So then if, while [her] husband liveth [zao:G2198], she be married to another man, she shall be called an adulteress: but if her husband be dead, she is free from that law; so that she is no adulteress, though she be married to another man. {4} Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, [even] to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God.”


Hebrews 10:16-20 makes this declaration (quoting Jeremiah 31:31-34, as we discovered with Hebrews 8:10-12 and Hebrews 10:16-17 in Part 20) : “This [is] the covenant that I will make with them after those days, saith the Lord, I will put my laws into their hearts, and in their minds will I write them; {17} And their sins and iniquities will I remember no more. {18} Now where remission of these [is, there is] no more offering for sin. {19} Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, {20} By a new and living  [zao:G2198] way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;”


Perhaps we can take a closer look at the last phrase in verse 20, “...through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;” in another study, as this would seem to impinge upon our present study.


There is one word that we have not looked at yet in Hebrews 9:16-17, which I will read again, and it is the term, “the death (thanatos:G2288) of the testator” 


“For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death [thanatos:G2288] of the testator. {17} For a testament is of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.” 


 The Death [thanatos:G2288]


Throughout this series we have confirmed multiple times that “the death of the testator” keeps bringing us back to“...the foundation of the world,” which is when Christ paid for the sins of each of the elect that make up the Body or Bride of Christ, to whom He is spiritually married to; what transpired on the Cross and the events surrounding Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection help us to gain a deeper appreciation of what took place at the foundation, when no human being was present to witness the inexplicable wonder how eternal God - Who is “...holy, harmless, and undefiled, separate from sinners”- could become sin, and die, and be annihilated on behalf of His people, and then victoriously arise from that annihilation, as the “firstbegotten” or “firstborn” “from” or “of”  the dead.


This is why we read in Acts 2:24, in which the same word for death is used, as  “Whom God hath raised up, having loosed the pains of death [thanatos:G2288]: because it was not possible that he should be holden of it.”


Romans 6:9 likewise declares: “Knowing that Christ being raised from the dead dieth no more; death [thanatos:G2288] hath no more dominion over him.”


In Philippians 2:8, “death” is repeated:“And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death [thanatos:G2288], even the death [thanatos:G2288] of the cross.”


Lastly, Colossians 1:22 maintains:  “In the body of his flesh through death [thanatos:G2288], to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight:”


I think we will stop here today. Lord willing, in our next study I would like to address the historical parable of the mysterious priest, Melchisedec.


The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 22

June 9, 2019


This is Part 22 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is June 9, 2019. In one of our earlier studies in this series we considered the Greek term rendered predominantly as “arise” (anistemi:G450) in Hebrews 7:11 and 15, in which it appears twice: 


“If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need [was there] that another priest should rise [anistemi:G450] after the order of Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198], and not be called after the order of Aaron? ... {15} And it is yet far more evident: for that after the similitude of Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198], there ariseth [anistemi:G450]  another priest,”


At that time I raised the question, “What does God have in mind by bringing up Melchisedec in connection with this word, “should rise” (anistemi:G450)?” So today, I would like to begin answering that question by looking at this mysterious priest, Melchisedec, that we find in both the Old and New Testaments, and see in which way He might relate to the “...Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” Let’s first look at  the following New Testament citations, in which Melchisedec surfaces 9 times:


Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198 - from (Melchisedek:H4442)]


Hebrews 5:6 and 10 teach: “As he saith also in another [place], Thou [art] a priest for ever after the order [taxis:G5010] of Melchisedec. [Melchisedek:G3198] ... {10} Called of God an high priest after the order of Melchisedec.” [Melchisedek:G3198]


And Hebrews 6:20 adds: “Whither the forerunner is for us entered, [even] Jesus, made an high priest for ever after the order [taxis:G5010] of Melchisedec.” [Melchisedek:G3198]


Hebrews 7:1, 10-11, 15, 17, 21, “For this Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198], king [basileus:G935] of Salem [Salem:G4532], priest of the most high God, who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him... {10} For he was yet in the loins of his father, when Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198] met him. {11} If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need [was there] that another priest should rise after the order [taxis:G5010] of Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198], and not be called after the order [taxis:G5010]  of Aaron? ... {15} And it is yet far more evident: for that after the similitude of Melchisedec [Melchisedek:G3198] there ariseth another priest, ... {17} For he testifieth, Thou [art] a priest for ever after the order [taxis:G5010]  of Melchisedec. [Melchisedek:G3198] ... {21} (For those priests were made without an oath; but this with an oath by him that said unto him, The Lord sware and will not repent, Thou [art] a priest for ever after the order [taxis:G5010]  of Melchisedec:)” [Melchisedek:G3198]


Melchisedek [Malkiy-Tsedeq:H4442 - from (melek:H4428) and (tsedeq:H6664)]


In Hebrew, Melchisedec is a compound word, consisting of the term, “King” (melek:H4428) and the word, “Righteousness” (tsedeq:H6664), or “King of Righteousness.” Furthermore, God adds another epithet, namely, “King of Salem,” or “King of Peace” in Hebrews 7:1. We find H4442 in only two Old Testament passages:


Genesis 14:18 declares: And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he [was] the priest of the most high God.”


And Psalm 110:4 proclaims: “The LORD hath sworn, and will not repent, Thou [art] a priest for ever after the order [dibrah:H1700] of Melchizedek.


Now that we have covered the verses in which the name Melchisedec appears, I would like to first establish the identity of this mysterious priest...


Who Was Melchisedec?


As noted above, Hebrews 7 contains the most amount of information concerning Melchisedec, and to understand who he was, I am going to start with the astounding declaration that we find in Hebrews 7:3 which states:


“Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.”


Let’s dissect this verse, which is made up of seven English statements (or 18 Hebrew terms) to understand this marvelous affirmation that surrounds Melchisedec:


Without Father [apator:G540]


The term, “without father” is only found in this verse, and it is a compound word that is made up of the “alpha” (G1) or negative prefix, and then the word for “father” (pater:H3962) 


Without Mother [ametor:G282]


This is also the case with the term, “without mother,” in which God employs the “alpha” (G1) negative prefix again, along with word for “mother” (meter:G3384); here again this word is only found in Hebrews 7:3.


Without Descent [agenealogetos:G35]


For the third time, we discover another “alpha” (G1) negative prefix, in front of the main word, “genealogeo” (G1075), and only found in this verse. Incidentally our English word, genealogy, is derived from this Greek term. Curiously, G1075 also happens to be a compound word, which is made up of  “genea” (G1074), which is predominantly translated as “generation,” and the familiar tem, “logos” (G3056) or “word” - or we could say the “generation of the word” or “descent of the word.” Actually, “genealogeo” (G1075) only surfaces in one significant passage in this very chapter, in verse 6, and rendered as “he whose descent is counted,” and of course there is a “not” preceding “counted” since he is “without descent.” 


What we have seen thus far are three terms - “father,” mother,” and “descent” that are preceded by the negative “alpha” (G1) prefix, but this same “negative” prefix is also used in the following four supremely positive proclamations, found by itself only in Revelation 1:8, 11, 21:6, and 22:13,


“I am Alpha [alpha:G1] and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord, which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty. ... {11} Saying, I am Alpha [alpha:G1]  and Omega, the first and the last: and, What thou seest, write in a book, and send [it] unto the seven churches which are in Asia; unto Ephesus, and unto Smyrna, and unto Pergamos, and unto Thyatira, and unto Sardis, and unto Philadelphia, and unto Laodicea... {21:6} And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha [alpha:G1]  and Omega, the beginning and the end. I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life freely….{22:13} I am Alpha [alpha:G1]  and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last.” 


However, there are still two other phrases which are also cast in the same light, by the use of the correlative conjunctions iIn English) “neither” and “nor”:  “...having neither [mete:G3383] beginning of days...” and “... nor [mete:G3383] end of life…”  


Having [echo:G2192] Neither [mete:G3383] Beginning [arche:G746] Of Days [hemera:G2250]


The first phrase, “...having neither beginning of days…” consists of four expressions which only appear together in this verse. All human beings have a  “beginning” or birth, if you will, and their temporary life continues until the day of their death, for the precise number of days that God has prescribed for them. For somebody to not have “beginning of days,” indicates that they never had a “beginning,” and that can only be possible if one is eternal. In some of our earlier “Lamb Slain” studies we also discussed this important term, “beginning” (arche:G746), so it might be helpful to review some of those key passages that include this word:


John 1:1-2 maintains: “In the beginning [arche:G746]  was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. {2} The same was in the beginning [arche:G746]  with God.”


Colossians 1:18 likewise asserts: “And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning [arche:G746], the firstborn from the dead; that in all [things] he might have the preeminence.”


Hebrews 1:10 similarly renders this expression as “the beginning”: “And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning [arche:G746] hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands:”


Revelation 3:14 also states: “And unto the angel of the church of the Laodiceans write; These things saith the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the beginning [arche:G746]  of the creation of God;”


By the way, Revelation 1:8, 21:6, and 22:13 which I quoted earlier, in our discussion of “Alpha” (G1), also contain this expression, “the beginning,” as well.


Let’s move on to the second phrase,


Nor [mete:G3383] End [telos:G5056] Of Life [zoe:G2222]


The two Greek words, “end of life” only emerge in two other references, and Christ is also described as the “end,”  just as He is the “beginning.”


In Romans 6:22 one learns, “But now being made free from sin, and become servants to God, ye have your fruit unto holiness, and the end [telos:G5056] everlasting life.” [zoe:G2222] 


Revelation 21:6 also teaches: “And he said unto me, It is done. I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end. [telos:G5056] I will give unto him that is athirst of the fountain of the water of life [zoe:G2222] freely.”


After the foregoing five negative affirmations, God introduces two “positive” announcements, if you will, in the last half of Hebrews 7:3, “...but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually,” which we need to now address:


But [de:G1161] Made Like [aphomoioo:G871] Unto The Son [huios:G5207] Of God [theos:G2316]


The first phrase consists of four terms, two of which we have already investigated previously - “Son of God” - when we were discussing this title that Christ received following His atonement and resurrection “...at the foundation of the world,” as outlined in Romans 1:4,


“And declared [to be] the Son [huios:G5207] of God [theos:G2316]

 with power, according to the spirit of holiness, by the resurrection from the dead:”


Made Like [aphomoioo:G871] 


Instead, I would like to focus on a very pertinent word that is tremendously relevant to our examination of the Lamb Slain. This is the word, “made like” (aphomoioo:G871), which is equating Melchisedec with “the Son of God,” which is uniquely significant, and so is the fact that this expression is limited to this passage alone. However, it should also be noted that this term is a another compound word, consisting of the prefix “apo” (G575 - a preposition), and the main word, “homoioo” (G3666), which is translated as some form of “likeness” or “resemblance.” Here are some illustrations of how God employs this Greek verb, which frequently is used to depict the “kingdom of God,” and is also utilized to characterize either the elect or  the non-elect, depending on the context.


Mark 4:30 offers this analogy, in which this term is rendered as “shall we liken”:“And he said, Whereunto shall we liken [homooio:G3666] the kingdom of God? or with what comparison [parabole:G3850] shall we compare [paraballo:G3846] it?”


Keep in mind that the two words, “comparison” - a noun form derived from the verb form - “shall we compare,” relate to the parabolic nature of the Word of God, and highlight God’s methodology for studying the Scriptures. Here are a few examples of how God incorporates this term:


In verse 11 of Acts 14:8-15, G3666 is rendered as, “in the likeness”: “And there sat a certain man at Lystra, impotent in his feet, being a cripple from his mother's womb, who never had walked: {9} The same heard Paul speak: who stedfastly beholding him, and perceiving that he had faith to be healed, {10} Said with a loud voice, Stand upright on thy feet. And he leaped and walked.{11} And when the people saw what Paul had done, they lifted up their voices, saying in the speech of Lycaonia, The gods are come down to us in the likeness [homooio:G3666]  of men. {12} And they called Barnabas, Jupiter; and Paul, Mercurius, because he was the chief speaker. {13} Then the priest of Jupiter, which was before their city, brought oxen and garlands unto the gates, and would have done sacrifice with the people. {14} [Which] when the apostles, Barnabas and Paul, heard [of], they rent their clothes, and ran in among the people, crying out, {15} And saying, Sirs, why do ye these things? We also are men of like passions with you, and preach unto you that ye should turn from these vanities unto the living God, which made heaven, and earth, and the sea, and all things that are therein:”


What is noteworthy about this account is that many of the inhabitants of Lystra,  recognized in their sinful minds the fact that the “gods” as they perceived them, could take on a human nature, and perform miracles, which is why they were so quick to worship Paul and Barnabas in the historical context. We also see this, by the way, with even a child of God, as was the case with the Roman centurion, Cornelius, as he met Peter initially and proceeded to do the very same thing, according to Acts 10:25-26, and of course, Peter, like Paul and Barnabas, disavowed such worship immediately:


“And as Peter was coming in, Cornelius met him, and fell down at his feet, and worshipped [him]. {26} But Peter took him up, saying, Stand up; I myself also am a man.”   


The Bible is crystal clear that He will not “share” His glory with anyone else other than the other two Persons of the Godhead, as Isaiah 42:8 insists:


“I [am] the LORD: that [is] my name: and my glory will I not give to another, neither my praise to graven images.” 


The next passage which contains the word, G3666 is Hebrews 2:17, in which this term is translated as, “to be made like,” and refers to Christ as the elect’s high priest, and of course this parallels what we are learning about Melchisedec: “Wherefore in all things it behoved him to be made like [homooio:G3666] unto [his] brethren, that he might be a merciful and faithful high priest in things [pertaining] to God, to make reconciliation for the sins of the people.”


This brings us to the next vitally important word… “...made like…


Please note how significant this statement is with regard to Melchisedec: “...made like unto the Son of God”


Various commentaries pitifully downgrade, and rob the Word of God (which is why I do not quote them generally) by claiming that Melchisedec was, in the words of (one commentary) Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown, (and I quote): “There is nothing in the account, Genesis 14:18-20, to mark Melchisedec as a superhuman being: he is classed with the other kings in the chapter as a living historic personage…” (close quote). Sure, if you only look at Genesis 14:18-20 you might come to that erroneous conclusion, but that in turn, shows the degree of spiritual ignorance of God methodology for studying the Bible, because all you have to do is go to Hebrews 7:3, as I have attempted to do today, to show that Melchisedec is no ordinary human being. No ordinary human being can fit the description of what Hebrews 7:3 affirms:


“Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.”


Lord willing, in our next study, we will examine the last few words in Hebrews 7:3, “...abideth a priest continually.”


The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 23

June 16, 2019


This is Part 23 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is June 16th, 2019. Last week we began an investigation of Melchisedec, that mysterious priest that we read about in both the Old and New Testaments. Our examination centered around Hebrews 7:3, which states:


“Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.”


We left off at the last phrase, “...abideth a priest continually,” which consists of four words, which only appear together is this passage, so we will have to consider them separately:


Abideth [meno:G3306] A Priest [hierus:G2409] Continually [(eis:G1519) / (dienekes:G1319)


Abideth [meno:G3306]


The term, “abideth,” is found 120 times, and predominantly as “abide,” and to a lesser degree as “remain,” “dwell,” “continue,” “tarry,” and “endure,” etc. The following citations reflect some of the ways that God employs this term:


Hebrews 7:24 makes this declaration concerning Christ, in which this is translated as, “continueth”: “But this [man], because he continueth [meno:G3306] ever [(eis:G1519)/ (aion:G165), hath an unchangeable priesthood.”


In John 3:36, it is rendered as “abideth”: “He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth [meno:G3306]  on him.”

John 6:27 expresses it as, “endureth”: “Labour not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth unto everlasting life, which the Son of man shall give unto you: for him hath God the Father sealed.”


In Hebrews 13:14, it is rendered again as “continuing”: “For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come.”


1 Peter 1:23 and 25 it is translated as “abideth” and “endureth” respectively: “Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth for ever. ... {25} But the word of the Lord endureth for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you.”


A Priest [hiereus:G2409]


In our study of Melchisedec we have already encountered the word, “a priest,” in Part 22, in a number of references, but they bear repeating because of their connection to the priesthood of the Lord Jesus Christ. However, before we do that, I would like to mention that this term “a priest” is derived from the root word, rendered “holy” (hieros:G2413), and only surfaces in the following two passages:


In 1 Corinthians 9:13 translates this word as “about holy things”: “Do ye not know that they which minister about holy things [hieros:G2413] live [of the things] of the temple? and they which wait at the altar are partakers with the altar?”


And in 2 Timothy 3:15, it is rendered as, “the holy” referring to the Word of God, during the day of salvation: “And that from a child thou hast known the holy [hieros:G2413] scriptures, which are able to make thee wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus.”


Please note how these next Scriptures contain this word, “a priest,” and link it with the phrase, “after the order of Melchisedec” repeatedly: 


Quoting Psalm 110:4, Hebrews 5:6 maintains: “As he saith also in another [place], Thou [art] a priest [hiereus:G2409] for ever after the order of Melchisedec.”


Likewise Hebrews 7:1, 11, 15, 17, 21, and 23 gloriously announce:“For this Melchisedec, king of Salem, priest [hiereus:G2409] of the most high God, who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him; ... {11} If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need [was there] that another priest [hiereus:G2409] should rise after the order of Melchisedec, and not be called after the order of Aaron? ... {15} And it is yet far more evident: for that after the similitude of Melchisedec there ariseth another priest [hiereus:G2409] , ... {17} For he testifieth, Thou [art] a priest [hiereus:G2409]  for ever after the order of Melchisedec. ... {21} (For those priests were made without an oath; but this with an oath by him that said unto him, The Lord sware and will not repent, Thou [art] a priest [hiereus:G2409]  for ever after the order of Melchisedec:)”


When we read that Melchisedec blessed Abraham in Hebrews 7:1, it is vital to recognize that only God can confer “blessing” - and all blessing (whether physical or spiritual) ultimately comes from Him, as we read in James 1:17, 


“Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning.”


Furthermore, we understand correctly that “the blessing” has to do with eternal life, according to Psalm 133:3,


“As the dew of Hermon, [and as the dew] that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the LORD commanded the blessing, [even] life for evermore.”


So we acknowledge that Melchisedec is not an ordinary man, as Hebrews 7:1 teaches, as Abraham - “the Father of a multitude” and the progenitor of the nation of Israel - is contrasted with Melchisedec, “the priest of the most high God”: 


“For this Melchisedec, king of Salem, priest of the most high God, who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him;”


Is it any wonder that Hebrews 7:7 explains this distinction in this way: “...the less [Abraham] is blessed of the better” [Melchisedec]:


“And without all contradiction the less is blessed of the better.”


Hebrews 7:1 and Genesis 14:18, can also be compared as the latter is quoted in the former, even though we won’t take the time in this study to perform that “word bridge”: 


“For this Melchisedec, king of Salem, priest [hierus:G2409] of the most high [hypsistos:G5310] God [theos:G2316], who met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings, and blessed him;”


“And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he [was] the priest [kohen:H3548] of the most high [’elyown:H5945] God.” [’el:H410]


However, I would like to draw your attention to the word, “of the most high” in Genesis 14:18, as this Hebrew term crops up in a most significant citation in verse 27 of Psalm 89:19-29, speaking of “David” (who typifies the Lord Jesus Christ spiritually) and associates Him with Melchisedec, by the use of this same term “of the most high” which is rendered as “higher” in Psalm 89:27, along with the very significant appellation, “[my] firstborn,” (bekowr:H1060), or to use the New Testament language of the “firstborn” or “firstbegotten” of the dead “...at the foundation of the world,”  that was discussed at length in some of our earlier studies in this series:


“Then thou spakest in vision to thy holy one, and saidst, I have laid help upon [one that is] mighty; I have exalted [one] chosen out of the people. {20} I have found David my servant; with my holy oil have I anointed him: {21} With whom my hand shall be established: mine arm also shall strengthen him. {22} The enemy shall not exact upon him; nor the son of wickedness afflict him. {23} And I will beat down his foes before his face, and plague them that hate him. {24} But my faithfulness and my mercy [shall be] with him: and in my name shall his horn be exalted. {25} I will set his hand also in the sea, and his right hand in the rivers. {26} He shall cry unto me, Thou [art] my father, my God, and the rock of my salvation. {27} Also I will make him [my] firstborn [bekowr:H1060], higher [’elyown:H5945] than the kings of the earth. {28} My mercy will I keep for him for evermore, and my covenant shall stand fast with him. {29} His seed also will I make [to endure] for ever, and his throne as the days of heaven.”


That After [kata:G2596] The Similitude [homoiotes:G3665]


The two words, “that after” and “the similitude” in Hebrews 7:15 along with the term “should arise” or “ariseth” (anistemi:G450) - found in both Hebrews 7:11 and 15 -  was the catalyst for embarking on this quest to discover how Melchisedec correlates with the “Lamb slain,” which I’ll quote again:


“If therefore perfection were by the Levitical priesthood, (for under it the people received the law,) what further need [was there] that another priest [hiereus:G2409] should rise after the order of Melchisedec, and not be called after the order of Aaron? ... {15} And it is yet far more evident: for that after [kata:G2596] the similitude [homoiotes:G3665] of Melchisedec there ariseth another priest.” [hiereus:G2409]


The two terms, “that after” and “the similitude” only surface again in Hebrews 4:15, as “like,” and “as”: 


“For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like [kata:G2596] as [homoiotes:G3665][we are, yet] without sin.”


Melchisedec is also called “the king of  Salem” or “king of peace” (eirene:G1515) as well as “king of Righteousness,” (dikaiosyne:G1343) as God Himself interprets that. God is also saying He is the Lord of Righteousness, because all the elect are righteous through Him. And of course, the expression “prince of peace,” reminds us of Isaiah 9:6,


“For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.”


The phrase,“The Lord our righteousness,” is also found in Jeremiah 23:6, which proclaims:


“In his days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell safely: and this [is] his name whereby he shall be called, THE LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS.”


Turning to the New Testament we find it in 1 John 2:1, as one of Christ’s many glorious names: 


“My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous:”


We also understand that Abraham “paid tithes” to Melchisedec in Hebrews 7:2, 4 and 6. Normally, the people had to give tithes to the priest, in order that the priesthood could be sustained, in order for them to continue their work. But here, Abraham pays tithes to Christ [Who is the High Priest], and of course, as we’ve seen over and over again, He is the very essence of eternal life...He has no mother or father, He has no genealogy… “Jesus Christ the same, yesterday, to day, and for ever…” as Hebrews 13:8 reveals. This is eternal God that appeared to Abraham, and blessed Abraham, and in turn – since he is “the father of all believers” – the blessing is on all the believers, because of the atoning work and faith of Christ, “at the foundation”: This is further emphasized by the often quoted phrase, “after the order of Melchisedec.”


We also read in Hebrews 6:13-20, “For when God made promise to Abraham, because he could swear by no greater, he sware by himself, {14} Saying, Surely blessing I will bless thee, and multiplying I will multiply thee. {15} And so, after he had patiently endured, he obtained the promise. {16} For men verily swear by the greater: and an oath [horkos:H3727] for confirmation [is] to them an end of all strife. {17} Wherein God, willing more abundantly to shew unto the heirs of promise the immutability of his counsel, confirmed [it] by an oath: [horkos:H3727] {18} That by two immutable things, in which [it was] impossible for God to lie, we might have a strong consolation, who have fled for refuge to lay hold upon the hope set before us: {19} Which [hope] we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil; {20} Whither the forerunner is for us entered, [even] Jesus, made an high priest for ever after the order of Melchisedec.


A Closer Look At The Oath [horkos:H3727]


The expression, “by an oath,” or “an oath”  in Hebrews 6:16-17,

surfaces in 8 other references, and we will consider a few of them: 


Luke 1:73 declares: “The oath [horkos:H3727] which he sware to our father Abraham,”


Acts 2:30 likewise references David in the historical context:  “Therefore being a prophet, and knowing that God had sworn with an oath [horkos:H3727]  to him, that of the fruit of his loins, according to the flesh, he would raise up Christ to sit on his throne;”


Continually [(eis:G1519) / (dienekes:G1336)


The last term in Hebrews 7:3 is “continually;” it only emerges in three other verses that are all found in Hebrews 10:1, 12 and 14, which underscore the eternal nature of both Melchisedec as well as the high priesthood of the Lord Jesus Christ, Whose one sacrifice at the foundation of the world, secured the salvation of each of the elect:


I’ll read Hebrews 7:3 again with regard to Melchisedec: “Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually.” [(eis:G1519) / (dienekes:G1336)


The similar usage of the same term, “continually,” or “for ever”  in Hebrews 10:1, 12, and 14 three times - alluding to the Lord Jesus Christ - inextricably links the two men together, because they are the same Divine Person:


“For the law having a shadow of good things to come, [and] not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually [(eis:G1519) / (dienekes:G1336) make the comers thereunto perfect. ... {12} But this man, after he had offered one sacrifice for sins for [eis:G1519] ever [dienekes:G1336], sat down on the right hand of God; ... {14} For by one offering he hath perfected for [eis:G1519] ever [dienekes:G1336 ] them that are sanctified.”


I think we’ll stop here today. Lord willing, in our next study we will consider the spiritual implications of Hebrews 10:20, as they relate to the “Lamb slain”: “By a new and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;”

The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 24

June 23, 2019


This is Part 24 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is June 23rd, 2019. Last week, I mentioned that today we would take an in-depth look at Hebrews 10:20, which states:

 

By a new [prosphatos:G4372] and [kai:G2532] living [zao:G2198] way [hodos:G3598], which [hos:G3739] he hath consecrated [egkainizo:G1457] for us, [hemin:G2254] through [dia:G1223] the veil, [katapetasma:G2665] that is to say, [tout’ estin:G5123] his [autos:G846] flesh;” [sarx:G4561] and see how this might relate to “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.”


This passage is a fitting conclusion to are discussion of “the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world,” but in no way is it exhaustive, as God has undoubtedly hidden other precious examples of this doctrine elsewhere in His Word for His people to discover. 


By A New [prosphatos:G4372] And [kai:G2532] Living [zao:G2198] Way [hodos:G3598]


The first phrase is Hebrews 10:20 consists of three main terms that only surface together in this verse, so we will have to consider them individually.


By A New [prosphatos:G4372]


The first word, “by a new” (G4372) is only found here, and it is a compound word, made up of “pro” (G4253) and the main word, “sphazo” (G4969), which is highly relevant to our discussion of the “Lamb slain,” because it is primarily rendered as “slay,” eight times out of ten total! The other ways it is translated is “kill” and “wound.” Amazingly, four of these references are found in connection with the “Lamb slain” in the book of Revelation:


Revelation 5:6, 9, 12 proclaim: “And I beheld, and, lo, in the midst of the throne and of the four beasts, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb as it had been slain [sphazo:G4969], having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven Spirits of God sent forth into all the earth. ... {9} And they sung a new song, saying, Thou art worthy to take the book, and to open the seals thereof: for thou wast slain [sphazo:G4969], and hast redeemed us to God by thy blood out of every kindred, and tongue, and people, and nation; ... {12} Saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain [sphazo:G4969] to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour, and glory, and blessing.”


And Revelation 13:8 underscores this magnificent truth as well: “And all that dwell upon the earth shall worship him, whose names are not written in the book of life of the Lamb slain [sphazo:G4969]  from the foundation of the world.”


Based on the foregoing information, this term, “by a new” should have been translated as “before slain,” because evidently  it has nothing to do with the word, “new,” since God could have easily used a term such as “kainos” (G2537), or one of its derivatives, if He was intent on conveying something “new,” although this doctrine is certainly “new” in the sense that it is one of those doctrines that God has brought to our attention. However, we can understand why the translators would have had difficulties with “before slain,” - in spite of what Revelation 13:8 states - since God had not opened their eyes to this truth, and their focus would have been on the Cross in 33 AD, like so many still insist today. Furthermore, when we read Hebrews 10:19-20, incorporating the words, “before slain,”  it fits the context, since it refers to the “blood (or “life”) of Jesus” which precedes the expression, “before slain,” followed by the term, “living,” underscoring both Christ’s death and resurrection at the foundation of the world that we have been examining in these 24 studies: 


“Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, {20} “Before slain” and living way, which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;”


When we think of how God has hidden this monumental truth encapsulated within this little word, “prosphatos,” - and only found in this one verse - we recall a passage like Matthew 13:35, and marvel at God’s mercy and goodness to His elect in feeding them so bountifully from His generous hand during these days:


“That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophet, saying, I will open my mouth in parables; I will utter things which have been kept secret from the foundation of the world.


Living [zao:G2198] 


The next word in this verse is, “living,” which is contrasted with some form of “dying,” - and “death and resurrection” - is one of the greatest themes that runs all throughout the Bible. However, when we were discussing “the death of the testator” recently, we examined this word in Hebrews 9:17, which states:


“For a testament [is] of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth.” [zao:G2198]


So I won’t rehearse those citations again because we want to move ahead in our examination of Hebrews 10:20, to the next expression which is...


Way [hodos:G3598]


...as we read the notable statement found in John 14:6 that includes this word:


“Jesus saith unto him, I am the way [hodos:G3598], the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.”


Matthew 7:13-14 also exhorts: “Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide [is] the gate, and broad [is] the way [hodos:G3598], that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat: {14} Because strait [is] the gate, and narrow [is] the way [hodos:G3598], which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.”


And Luke 1:79 maintains:  “To give light to them that sit in darkness and [in] the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way [hodos:G3598] of peace.”


Revelation 15:3 further adds: “And they sing the song of Moses the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, Great and marvellous [are] thy works, Lord God Almighty; just and true [are] thy ways [hodos:G3598], thou King of saints.”


He Hath Consecrated [egkainizo:G1457]


“He hath consecrated” is the next term that we want to ponder in Hebrews 10:20; it only emerges again in Hebrews 9:18, as “was dedicated,” which is a chapter that we have returned to at various times in this series, since it speaks, among other truths, about the Lord Jesus as the elect’s “High Priest,” and the “testator” of the will who had to die first in order for the will to go into effect, and thirdly, the nature of His unique sacrifice of Himself once “at the foundation of the world” for the sins of each of His chosen people. The root word for “egkainizo” (G1457), (a Greek verb), stems from “egkainia” (G1456 - a Greek noun), and only surfaces in John 10:22, and is rendered as “the feast of the dedication,” which has to do with the “dedication of the altar” as well as “the feast of tabernacles” or “booths” (which is really the “feast of the Bible” as Mr. Camping carefully pointed out) - both of which were celebrated simultaneously - when Solomon’s Temple was completed in the seventh month, as we read in 2 Chronicles 5:1-3, and 7:9-10, respectively:


“Thus all the work that Solomon made for the house of the LORD was finished: and Solomon brought in [all] the things that David his father had dedicated; and the silver, and the gold, and all the instruments, put he among the treasures of the house of God. {2} Then Solomon assembled the elders of Israel, and all the heads of the tribes, the chief of the fathers of the children of Israel, unto Jerusalem, to bring up the ark of the covenant of the LORD out of the city of David, which [is] Zion. {3} Wherefore all the men of Israel assembled themselves unto the king in the feast which [was] in the seventh month…{7:9} And in the eighth day they made a solemn assembly: for they kept the dedication of the altar seven days, and the feast seven days. {10} And on the three and twentieth day of the seventh month he sent the people away into their tents, glad and merry in heart for the goodness that the LORD had shewed unto David, and to Solomon, and to Israel his people.”


This is also corroborated in Leviticus 23:34 and 39: “Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, The fifteenth day of this seventh month [shall be] the feast of tabernacles [for] seven days unto the LORD. ... {39} Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the LORD seven days: on the first day [shall be] a sabbath, and on the eighth day [shall be] a sabbath.


With that in mind, let’s go back to Hebrews 9, verses 3, 7-8, 11, 14-18, 24-26, and 28; incidentally, keep in mind that the same word for “veil”  as well as the expression, “that is to say” in Hebrews 10:20 also surface in Hebrews 9:3 and 11, 


“And after the second veil [katapetasma:G2665], the tabernacle which is called the Holiest of all; ... {7} But into the second [went] the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and [for] the errors of the people: {8} The Holy Ghost this signifying, that the way into the holiest of all was not yet made manifest, while as the first tabernacle was yet standing: ... {11} But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say [tout’ estin:G5123], not of this building; ... {14} How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? {15}  And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions [that were] under the first testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance. {16 } For where a testament [is], there must also of necessity be the death of the testator. {17} For a testament [is] of force after men are dead: otherwise it is of no strength at all while the testator liveth. {18} Whereupon neither the first [testament] was dedicated [egkainizo:G1457] without blood. {19} For when Moses had spoken every precept to all the people according to the law, he took the blood of calves and of goats, with water, and scarlet wool, and hyssop, and sprinkled both the book, and all the people, ... {24} For Christ is not entered into the holy places made with hands, [which are] the figures of the true; but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us: {25} Nor yet that he should offer himself often, as the high priest entereth into the holy place every year with blood of others; {26} For then must he often have suffered since the foundation of the world: but now once in the end of the world hath he appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of himself. ... {28} So Christ was once offered to bear the sins of many; and unto them that look for him shall he appear the second time without sin unto salvation.”


Let’s review Hebrews 10:19-20 again, as we come down to the last half of this exceptional declaration, and I will substitute the words, “before slain, instead of “by a new”: 


“Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, {20} “Before slain” and living way, which he hath consecrated [or “dedicated”]  for us [i.e., “the elect]  through the veil, that is to say, his flesh;”


 Through [dia:G1223] The Veil [katapetasma:G2665]


The two words, “through” and “the veil,”  are only found together in this verse, so let’s take a closer look at this term, “veil,”


The Veil [katapetasma:G2665]


We have already seen that this word appears in Hebrews 9:3, as I mentioned earlier, but it also emerges in the following four passages, three of which are set in the context of the Cross in 33 AD, which as we have learned, is a “demonstration,” ot “tableau” of what occurred at “...the foundation of the world;” in each case, this word is rendered as “the veil” (except in Hebrews 9:3, where it is translated as “veil” only):


Matthew 27:51 reveals: “And, behold, the veil [katapetasma:G2665]

 of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent;”


Similarly, Mark 15:38 affirms: “And the veil [katapetasma:G2665]

 of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom.”


Luke 23:45 provides additional information regarding the “darkening” of the sun, which is a figure to represent judgment: “And the sun was darkened, and the veil [katapetasma:G2665] of the temple was rent in the midst.”


Our last reference is Hebrews 6:19, “Which [hope] we have as an anchor of the soul, both sure and stedfast, and which entereth into that within the veil;” [katapetasma:G2665]


That Is To Say [tout’ estin:G5123]


The next term, “that is to say” is a figure of speech,  linking “the veil” with “His (Christ’s) flesh.” Because of this association, and since the Bible teaches that the “veil” was torn from “top to bottom” or “rent in the midst” we wonder how and when this could have taken place, because we do not read in any of the Gospel accounts that Christ’s body was somehow “torn in half” while on the Cross? Here are some other illustrations of how God utilizes this term, which serves to either interpret something or to clarify its meaning:


Matthew 27:46 records, “And about the ninth hour Jesus cried with a loud voice, saying, Eli, Eli, lama sabachthani? that is to say [tout’ estin:G5123], My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?”


And Hebrews 9:11 asserts: “But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say [tout’ estin:G5123], not of this building;”


1 Peter 3:20 maintains: “Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is [tout’ estin:G5123], eight souls were saved by water.”


His [autos:G846] Flesh [sarx:G4561]


These next Scriptures show some of the ways that God uses the words “his” and “flesh” together:


Acts 2:31 speaks of the “demonstration” in 33 AD, in which Christ’s body did not experience “corruption,” or decay, due to the fact that He was not bearing sin: “He seeing this before spake of the resurrection of Christ, that his soul was not left in hell, neither his [autos:G846]  flesh [sarx:G4561] did see corruption.”


In Ephesians 2:15 we learn that Christ conquered the penalty for transgressing the law which is death: “Having abolished in his [autos:G846]  flesh [sarx:G4561] the enmity, [even] the law of commandments [contained] in ordinances; for to make in himself of twain one new man, [so] making peace;”


Colossians 1:22 also alludes to Christ’s victory over sin and death “...at the foundation of the world,” as the sole means of redeeming His people: “In the body of his [autos:G846] flesh [sarx:G4561] through death, to present you holy and unblameable and unreproveable in his sight:”


And Ephesians 5:30 describes the marvelous spiritual union between Christ and His Bride (as typified spiritually by Adam’s pronouncement in Genesis 2:23-24, in which he represents Christ and Eve, the elect): “For we are members of his [autos:G846] body, of his [autos:G846] flesh [sarx:G4561], and of his [autos:G846] bones.”


It looks like we will have to stop here for today, and Lord willing, continue our examination of Hebrews 10:20 in our next study.


The Lamb Slain From The Foundation Of The World - Part 25

July 7, 2019


This is Part 25 of The Lamb Slain series, and today’s date is July 7, 2019. We are continuing our investigation of Hebrews 10:20,  


By a new [prosphatos:G4372] and [kai:G2532] living [zao:G2198] way [hodos:G3598], which [hos:G3739] he hath consecrated [egkainizo:G1457] for us, [hemin:G2254] through [dia:G1223] the veil, [katapetasma:G2665] that is to say, [tout’ estin:G5123] his [autos:G846] flesh;” [sarx:G4561] 


The purpose for taking a closer look at Hebrews 10:20 is to see if it is indeed related to Christ “...being slain from the foundation of the world,” as we consider the fact that God is interpreting [through the usage of the Greek term “that is to say” (tout’estin:G5123)] the “veil” of the Temple with Christ’s  “flesh,” which was torn in half from “top to bottom” or “rent in twain,” or “rent in the midst.” We acknowledge that his “flesh” or “body” was not ripped in half while He was on the Cross...this is very clear. So what is the spiritual reality that God has hidden in this analogy of His “flesh” being torn in half?  As we have learned, payment for sin did not occur on the Cross, so Hebrews 10:20 has to be referring to what transpired in the Atonement at “...the foundation of the world.”


At the same time we have correctly understood that the “veil” that separated the “Holy of Holies” from the rest of the Temple, revealed that God divorced Himself from national Israel,  and no longer used them as His divine organism, as He had for 1480 years. This meant that the Temple was no longer holy, Jerusalem was no longer the “holy” city, and the Israelites were no longer God’s holy people. This is turn mirrors God’s judgment which began at His own “house” (i.e., the end-time institutional churches and denominations) on May 21, 1988, after having utilized them for 1955 years as His divine organism. 



Let’s remember that the veil was that very thick curtain which separated the main part of the Temple (“the holy”) from that special enclosure known as “the holy of holies,” which only the high priest could enter in once a year on the Day of Atonement, clothed in plain linen garments (so as not to sweat, which would indicate “work” - and specifically, “working” for one's salvation), with incense and blood, as within  the “holy of holies” was the Ark of the Covenant, where God's presence would reside, as we read in Hebrews 9:3, in which the same Greek term for “veil” (G2665) appears:


“And after the second veil [katapetasma:G2665], the tabernacle which is called the Holiest of all;”


The Distinction Between Israel’s  Earthly Priests And  The Superiority of The Priesthood Of The Lord Jesus Christ


The veil of the Temple illustrates, among other things, mankind’s inaccessibility to the Godhead without some kind of mediator, as we also learn from Hebrews 9:6-10,


“Now when these things were thus ordained, the priests went always into the first tabernacle, accomplishing the service [of God].{7} But into the second [went] the high priest alone once every year, not without blood, which he offered for himself, and [for] the errors of the people: {8} The Holy Ghost this signifying, that the way into the holiest of all was not yet made manifest, while as the first tabernacle was yet standing: {9} Which [was] a figure for the time then present, in which were offered both gifts and sacrifices, that could not make him that did the service perfect, as pertaining to the conscience; {10} [Which stood] only in meats and drinks, and divers washings, and carnal ordinances, imposed [on them] until the time of reformation.”


We know that what those earthly priests performed could not atone for anybody’s sins, but rather they looked - backward NOT forward - to the Cross, as we used to think (and the majority of so-called “Christians” still do today) but backward to “...the foundation of the world.” By contrast, we read further in verses 11-15, - and please note that this analysis of Christ’s perfect priesthood “after the order of Melchisedec” -  precedes the excellent presentation of “the death of the Testator” in verses 16-17 of this same chapter:  


“But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building; {12} Neither by the blood of goats and calves, but by his own blood he entered in once into the holy place, having obtained eternal redemption [for us]. {13} For if the blood of bulls and of goats, and the ashes of an heifer sprinkling the unclean, sanctifieth to the purifying of the flesh: {14} How much more shall the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without spot to God, purge your conscience from dead works to serve the living God? {15} And for this cause he is the mediator of the new testament, that by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions [that were] under the first testament, they which are called might receive the promise of eternal inheritance.”


In the foregoing passages we learn of two “tabernacles” - one “made with hands,” referring to the physical Tabernacle which Moses constructed and later on, Solomon’s Temple; the other “Temple” is not “made with hands” - and is speaking of Christ’s “body,” as He told the Jews in John 2:18-22.


“Then answered the Jews and said unto him, What sign shewest thou unto us, seeing that thou doest these things? {19} Jesus answered and said unto them, Destroy [lyo:G3089] this temple [naos:G3485], and in three days I will raise it up. {20} Then said the Jews, Forty and six years was this temple [naos:G3485] in building, and wilt thou rear it up in three days? {21} But he spake of the temple [naos:G3485] of his body. [soma:G4983] {22} When therefore he was risen from the dead, his disciples remembered that he had said this unto them; and they believed the scripture, and the word which Jesus had said.” 


So in this portion of Scripture two very significant points are being underscored: first, Christ is equating His “body” to the “temple” - which of course is “not made with hands;”  and secondly, although His body was subjected to “destruction,” He nonetheless affirms,  “I will raise it up.” The word, “destroy” in John 2:19, is only translated this way one other time with regard to “destroying” “...the works of the devil.” Ordinarily, it is rendered as “loose,” and to a lesser extent, “break,” “unloose,” “dissolve,” and “melt.” This reminds us of what we previously gleaned from Proverbs 8:22-23, in that amazing declaration that the Lord Jesus was “purchased” [“possessed”] at the “foundation”, when he was “poured out,” “offered,” and “melted” [“I was set up”] for the sins of all the elect. 


“The LORD possessed [qanah:H7069] me in the beginning [re’shiyth:H7225] of his way [derek:H1870], before his works of old. {23} I was set up [nacak:H5258] from everlasting, from the beginning [ro’sh:H7218], or ever the earth was."


We know that Christ was not “destroyed” or “melted” physically in terms of annihilation while on the Cross (although He voluntarily gave up His life), so  to reiterate this point,  this could only be referring to the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world.”  


Some Old Testament Examples Of “Tearing” Or “Rending”


I would like to now turn to the Old Testament, and consider some accounts related to the terms “tearing” or “rending,” which shed more light on this matter:


In verse 6 of Judges 14:5-9 we uncover a historical parable in which a “young lion” is torn in half by Samson, and it is significant that the term, “rent” is repeated side by side: “...upon him, and he rent [shaca`:H8156] him as he would have rent [shaca`:H8156]...”  The “young lion” represents Christ who died as a result of being “rent” “...at the foundation of the world.” Later on as Samson returns that way, he passes by the carcase of the “young lion” and  sees “...a swarm [or “congregation”] of bees and honey”  in the carcase of the dead lion, which in this context, typify God’s elect and the Word of God respectively, which confirms that the lion is indeed the Lord Jesus Christ: 


“Then went Samson down, and his father and his mother, to Timnath, and came to the vineyards of Timnath: and, behold, a young lion roared against him. {6} And the Spirit of the LORD came mightily upon him, and he rent [shaca`:H8156] him as he would have rent [shaca`:H8156] a kid, and [he had] nothing in his hand: but he told not his father or his mother what he had done. {7} And he went down, and talked with the woman; and she pleased Samson well. {8} And after a time he returned to take her, and he turned aside to see the carcase [mappeleth:H4658] of the lion: and, behold, [there was] a swarm of bees and honey in the carcase [geviyah:H1472] of the lion. {9} And he took thereof in his hands, and went on eating, and came to his father and mother, and he gave them, and they did eat: but he told not them that he had taken the honey out of the carcase of the lion.”


Verse 11 of Lamentations 3:1-13 uses the expression, “pulled me in pieces” in this chapter that spiritually describes the Lord Jesus under the wrath of God “...at the foundation of the world,” in which a different Hebrew word (H6582) is utilized:  “I [am] the man [that] hath seen affliction by the rod of his wrath. {2} He hath led me, and brought [me into] darkness, but not [into] light. {3} Surely against me is he turned; he turneth his hand [against me] all the day. {4} My flesh and my skin hath he made old; he hath broken my bones. {5} He hath builded against me, and compassed [me] with gall and travail. {6} He hath set me in dark places, as [they that be] dead of old. {7} He hath hedged me about, that I cannot get out: he hath made my chain heavy. {8} Also when I cry and shout, he shutteth out my prayer. {9} He hath inclosed my ways with hewn stone, he hath made my paths crooked. {10} He [was] unto me [as] a bear lying in wait, [and as] a lion in secret places. {11} He hath turned aside my ways, and pulled me in pieces [pashach:H6582]: he hath made me desolate. {12} He hath bent his bow, and set me as a mark for the arrow. {13} He hath caused the arrows of his quiver to enter into my reins.”


Joseph is a great type of Christ in many ways, and in Genesis 37:33 and 44:28 we find Jacob’s assessment of what he was led to believe happened to “...this son of his old age…,” when his other sons brought him the “coat of many colours” which they had dipped in blood to give the appearance that Joseph had been torn to pieces by an “evil beast;” a third Hebrew word (H2963) is used, and curiously found repeated side-by-side, as was noted in Judges 14:6. 


“And he knew it, and said, [It is] my son's coat; an evil beast hath devoured him; Joseph is without doubt [taraph:H2963] rent in pieces.” [taraph:H2963]... {44:28} “And the one went out from me, and I said, Surely [taraph:H2963] he is torn in pieces; [taraph:H2963] and I saw him not since:” 


Even though this did not take place in actuality, and Joseph was not killed, the fact that God allowed this aspect of this historical parable to take shape in the way it did, (and sadly remain in the forefront of Jacob’s mind for many years) underscores what did take place in the Atonement, “...at the foundation,” when Christ was annihilated, and then rose from the dead, and of course this was demonstrated in 33 AD on the Cross.


Another example of this same word (H2963) is found in verse 9 of Job 16:7-16, and is rendered as “he teareth,” in which Job pictures the Lord Jesus under God’s judgment; additionally there are three other Hebrew terms that convey the same idea in verses 12 and 14: “...but he hath broken me asunder…” (H6565), “...shaken me to pieces…” (H6327), and “...he breaketh me…” (H6555), and its derivative, “...with breach” (H6556) [upon] “breach” (H6556): 


“But now he hath made me weary: thou hast made desolate all my company. {8} And thou hast filled me with wrinkles, [which] is a witness [against me]: and my leanness rising up in me beareth witness to my face. {9} He teareth [taraph:H2963] [me] in his wrath, who hateth me: he gnasheth upon me with his teeth; mine enemy sharpeneth his eyes upon me. {10} They have gaped upon me with their mouth; they have smitten me upon the cheek reproachfully; they have gathered themselves together against me. {11} God hath delivered me to the ungodly, and turned me over into the hands of the wicked. {12} I was at ease, but he hath broken me asunder [parar:H6565]: he hath also taken [me] by my neck, and shaken me to pieces [puwts:H6327], and set me up for his mark. {13} His archers compass me round about, he cleaveth my reins asunder, and doth not spare; he poureth out my gall upon the ground. {14} He breaketh [parats:H6555 - a verb]  me with breach [perets:H6556 -  identically spelled to H6555, but a noun] upon breach [perets:H6556 - identically spelled to H6555, but a noun], he runneth upon me like a giant. {15} I have sewed sackcloth upon my skin, and defiled my horn in the dust. {16} My face is foul with weeping, and on my eyelids [is] the shadow of death;”


In verse 22 of Psalm 50:16-22 we discover another occurrence of the word, (H2963), which is translated as, “lest I tear [you] in pieces” that describes the fate of the “wicked” - which is what Christ was subjected to “...at the foundation of the world” - namely death and annihilation - as He was laden with the incomprehensible guilt and sin of all of His people:  “But unto the wicked God saith, What hast thou to do to declare my statutes, or [that] thou shouldest take my covenant in thy mouth? {17} Seeing thou hatest instruction, and castest my words behind thee. {18} When thou sawest a thief, then thou consentedst with him, and hast been partaker with adulterers. {19} Thou givest thy mouth to evil, and thy tongue frameth deceit. {20} Thou sittest [and] speakest against thy brother; thou slanderest thine own mother's son. {21} These [things] hast thou done, and I kept silence; thou thoughtest that I was altogether [such an one] as thyself: [but] I will reprove thee, and set [them] in order before thine eyes. {22} Now consider this, ye that forget God, lest I tear [you] in pieces, [taraph:H2963] and [there be] none to deliver.”


What Did Melchizedek Bring?


There is another aspect of this subject that is worth our consideration. If we go back to verse 18 of Genesis 14:18-20 we learn what two items that Melchizedec brought:


“And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread [lechem:H3899] and wine: [yayin:H3196] and he [was] the priest [kohen:H3548] of the most high [’elyown:H5945] God.” [’el:H410] {19} And he blessed him, and said, Blessed [be] Abram of the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth: {20} And blessed be the most high God, which hath delivered thine enemies into thy hand. And he [Abraham] gave him [Melchizedec] tithes of all.


It is highly significant that Genesis 14:18 is the first reference in the entire Bible, in which the two terms for “bread” and “wine” appear together, as well as the first place in the entire Bible, in which the term “and he [was] the priest” surfaces, dramatically underscoring that the Atonement - symbolized by “bread” and “wine” and typified by His body that was “broken” and “blood” (or “life”) that was offered to God “as a sweet smelling sacrifice” 


Interestingly enough, Proverbs 9:5 (as well as Proverbs 8) include these same two words, “of my bread,” and “of the wine” which “Wisdom” offers:


Come, eat of my bread [lechem:H3899], and drink of the wine [yayin:H3196] [which] I have mingled.”


“Wisdom” is the personification of the Lord Jesus Christ - Who in 1 Corinthians 1:24 is called “the wisdom of God.” And as one thinks of “bread” and “wine” connected with both the Lord Jesus and Melchizedec (since they are One and the same) we recall what John 6:51 and 53-56 affirm: 


“I am the living bread [artos:G740] which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread [artos:G740], he shall live for ever: and the bread [artos:G740]  that I will give is my [mou:G3450] flesh [sarx:G4561], which I will give for the life of the world. ... {53} Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh [sarx:G4561] of the Son of man, and drink his blood [haima:G129], ye have no life in you. {54} Whoso eateth my [mou:G3450]  flesh [sarx:G4561] , and drinketh my blood [haima:G129], hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. {55} For my [mou:G3450]  flesh [sarx:G4561]  is meat indeed, and my blood [haima:G129] is drink indeed. {56} He that eateth my [mou:G3450]  flesh [sarx:G4561], and drinketh my blood [haima:G129], dwelleth in me, and I in him….{58} This is that bread [artos:G740] which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread [artos:G740] shall live for ever.”


1 Corinthians 11:23-25 further records:“For I have received of the Lord that which also I delivered unto you, That the Lord Jesus the [same] night in which he was betrayed took bread: {24} And when he had given thanks, he brake [it] [klao:G2806], and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken [klao:G2806] for you: this do in remembrance of me. {25} After the same manner also [he took] the cup, when he had supped, saying, This cup is the new testament in my blood [haima:G129]: this do ye, as oft as ye drink [it], in remembrance of me.”


So in the foregoing passages we see that Christ’s “flesh” is identified with the “bread” that is “broken” in the same manner that his “flesh” is identified with the “veil” that was torn. 


Summary


As we conclude this series, I would like to once again briefly recap what we have learned: 


  1. The Atonement took place once.
  2. Christ’s body did not remain in the grave (“hell”) and hence did not decay in 33 AD, therefore no payment for sin could have been made at that time.
  3. Christ could only be the “firstborn from the dead” or “firstbegotten from the dead,” in the Atonement that took place “at the foundation of the world,” since others were raised from the dead prior to the Crucifixion in 33 AD.
  4. Christ was indeed “poured out” or “offered up” or “melted” - terms that vividly portray annihilation - which He voluntarily subjected Himself to in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world.”
  5. When Christ rose from death and annihilation “...from the foundation of the world,” He received the title, “Son of God.” 
  6. Christ is also the “first of the firstfruits” in addition to being the “birthright, both of which are related to Him being the “firstborn from the dead.” 
  7. Jonah 2 is a historical parable related to Christ under God's wrath at the foundation of the world. In that chapter we discovered 5 sets of English words (but 10 different Hebrew words) that God employs:“belly,” “cried,” “heard,” “compassed/closed me round about,” and “prayed/prayer.” The number 5 points spiritually to either salvation or judgment (as in this case) and the sequence of these dual terms highlight the atonement, “...at the foundation of the world,” as well as the demonstration in 33 AD. These 5 terms themselves also reflect an upward “pattern” of deliverance from the grave to the resurrection. 
  8. As the “Testator” of the will, Christ had to die “...at the foundation of the world” in order for those named within the will, to receive their eternal inheritance (or salvation).
  9. We learned the Lord Jesus Himself is identified with the phrase, “after the order of Melchisedec” seven times - a number that points to “perfection” -   (once in the Old Testament); and six times in the New Testament, because He is Melchisdec.
  10.  Christ’s “flesh” is identified with the “veil of the Temple,” which was torn from “top to bottom” or “rent in twain” in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world.” His “flesh” is also exemplified by “bread,” and “wine” which Mechizedec presented. In turn His “body” was “broken” symbolically at the “Last Supper” in anticipation of the Cross, which was re-enacting what had transpired “...at the foundation of the world,” as He voluntarily atoned for the sins of His elect, as the only “sweet smelling sacrifice,” that God accepts.