Bible Ministries International

Unsealed Teachings

The following studies examine the unsealed teachings that God had sealed up, until our day. Below you can learn about the different doctrines that we have learned since 1988.

Daniel 12:9 And he said, Go thy way, Daniel: for the words are closed up and sealed till the time of the end.

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The "Delay" (Parts 7-

The “Delay” - Part 7

March 14, 2021 


Welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship, and thank you for joining us today. Let’s begin by asking God for His blessing upon our time together... 


This will be The “Delay” - Part 7, and today’s date is March 14, 2021. For the past six consecutive Sundays we have been examining the topic of the “delay” with regard to the drawing of the 153 great fishes that we read about in John 21. You might recall that the reason I began this study was to answer the question of a caller to our Sunday Question & Answer program who said that he did not see this idea of the “delay” in that chapter, and why if somebody had been saved, would there not be the evidence of that spiritual transformation? Let’s consider what we have learned thus far in this series: 


  • We understand that a great multitude of people were saved during the last 17 years of the Great Tribulation, known as the Latter Rain (September 7, 1994 - May 21, 2011) in which the Gospel penetrated the world as never before, primarily through the ministry of Family Radio. This great multitude are in view in  Revelation 7:9-10, and 13-14, 


 After this I beheld, and, lo, a great [polus:G4183] multitude [ochlos:G3793], which no man could number, of all nations, and kindreds, and people, and tongues, stood before the throne, and before the Lamb, clothed with white robes, and palms in their hands; {10} And cried with a loud voice, saying, Salvation to our God which sitteth upon the throne, and unto the Lamb. ... {13} And one of the elders answered, saying unto me, What are these which are arrayed in white robes? and whence came they? {14} And I said unto him, Sir, thou knowest. And he said to me, These are they which came out of great tribulation, and have washed their robes, and made them white in the blood of the Lamb. 

  




  • We have also understood that when we speak of salvation we have to go back to the foundation of the world when the Lamb was slain (Revelation 13:8) as 2 Timothy 1:9 explains:


Who hath saved us, and called [us] with an holy calling, not according to our works, but according to his own purpose and grace, which was given us in Christ Jesus before the world began,


Ephesians 2:4-7 also adds: But God, who is rich in mercy, for his great love wherewith he loved us, {5} Even when we were dead in sins, hath quickened us together with Christ, (by grace ye are saved;) {6} And hath raised [us] up together, and made [us] sit together in heavenly [places] in Christ Jesus: {7} That in the ages to come he might shew the exceeding riches of his grace in [his] kindness toward us through Christ Jesus. 


  • One of the words that we considered in John 21:6 and 11 is the important word draw/drew or helko (G1670):


And he said unto them, Cast the net on the right side of the ship, and ye shall find. They cast therefore, and now they were not able to draw [helko:G1670] it for the multitude of fishes. ... {11} Simon Peter went up, and drew [helko:G1670] the net to land full of great fishes, an hundred and fifty and three: and for all there were so many, yet was not the net broken.


We discovered that this term, helko (G1670) is characterized by a forcible drawing against a person’s will. And please remember whose will is in view as James 1:18 points out:


Of his own will begat [“born from above”] he us with the word of truth [i.e., the words of the Bible], that we should be a kind of firstfruits of his creatures.


  • We also noted that just as there was a “delay” during the day of salvation as revealed by the examples of John the Baptist, the Apostle Paul, as well as the son of the Shunammite, there is even now a two-step  “delay” (if you will) or passage of time which elapsed as the 7 disciples were dragging [suro:G4951] the net through the sea close to shore. And then prior to eating the meal (of fish and bread), Christ gave the command in John 21:10,  Bring of the fish which ye have now caught.  That is when Peter drew [helko:G1670] the net to land. 


The question remains: in what way does this “two-step” passage of time manifest itself with regard to the individual members of this great multitude becoming aware that something of a profound spiritual nature has already taken place in their souls?  


  • John 6:44-45 is an outstanding example of the fact that the drawing process is rooted in the Father’s will: No man can [dunamai:G1610 - from the verb form, dunamis (G1411): power, mighty work, strength, and miracle predominantly] come [erchomai:G2064] to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw  [helko:G1670] him: and I will raise him up at in the last day. {45} It is written in the prophets, And they shall be all taught [didaktos:G1318] of God. Every man therefore that hath heard [akouo:G191], and hath learned [manthano:G3129] of the Father, cometh [erchomai:G2064] unto me.


Verse 45 because is crucial because it amplifies what is being stated in verse 44; moreover, it affords a “word bridge” back to the Old Testament because it is quoting verse 13 of Isaiah 54:1-13. In this extraordinary chapter we are confronted  with references to being barren and desolate (even as Elizabeth, Sarah, and Hannah were), and then the stretching forth of the curtains, the lengthening of the cords, and strengthening of the tent stakes pointing to the arrival of a great multitude requiring such enlargement, along with the inclusion of the waters of Noah, pointing to our present day of judgment, when there is spiritual desolation and barrenness because salvation has ended. Additionally, the telltale statements for a small moment have I forsaken thee and in a little wrath I hid my face from thee are indicative of our time which is characterized by spiritual “night time,” according to the time and season of John 9:4, I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man [i.e., Christ] can work.  This is the spiritual environment in which the drawing process is taking place. 


  • We also detected a very significant distinction between John 6:45 and Isaiah 54:13. John 6:45 uses four Greek verbs (taught/that hath heard/hath learned/cometh) that appear to identify with the day of salvation. On the other hand, the context of Isaiah 54 has to do with our present day of judgment, and only one verb is used: ...[shall be] taught [limmuwd:H3928/TWOT:1116a] of Jehovah... We then read this astounding declaration in verse 13: ...and great [shall be] the peace of thy children. The consequence of being taught of Jehovah results in peace, which  would have taken place prior to the door of salvation shutting. 

Jeremiah 31:34 uses another word in this same “word-family” which is rendered  and they shall teach, referring to our day, and the great multitude: And they shall teach [lamed:H3925] no more every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the LORD: for they shall all know me, from the least of them unto the greatest of them, saith the LORD: for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.


Isaiah 54 aptly describes our current environment today which shows no signs of life nor peace, and yet, amazingly there is life and peace for God’s elect, who like their Savior, are like ...a root out of a dry ground... as Isaiah 53:2 insists, 


For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root [sheresh:H8328/TWOT:2471a] out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, there is no beauty that we should desire him. 


By the way, the term and great modifying the word peace in Isaiah 54:13, must not be overlooked and is found in the following citations for instance:


Genesis 25:23 is a historical parable that emphasizes that mankind can be divided into two groups of individuals, in which this word and great is translated as and the elder:  And the LORD said unto her, Two nations [are] in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated from thy bowels; and [the one] people shall be stronger than [the other] people; and the elder [rab:H7227/TWOT:2099a, b] shall serve the younger.


Numbers 24:7 is an exceptional prophecy concerning the Lord Jesus Christ that we want to examine in further detail a little later because of the terms water(s) and seed; the term and great is rendered [shall be] in many: He shall pour the water out of his buckets, and his seed [shall be] in many [rab:H7227/TWOT:2099a, b] waters, and his king shall be higher than Agag, and his kingdom shall be exalted.

   

Mark 4:26-29 also speaks of the seed (which points to both the Savior with a capital “S,” and also the Word of God)  which would have taken place during the “time of sowing” when salvation was still possible. Please note that the term harvest  is indicative of our present day: 


And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man [Christ in the Man] should cast seed [sporos:G4703]  into the ground; {27} And should sleep, and rise night and day, and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. {29} But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle [drepanon:G1407], because the harvest [therismos:G2326] is come.


What is very significant about these two expressions, sickle and harvest is the fact that they only surface together again in verse 15 of Revelation 14:15-16, which depicts our current time of reaping - not sowing (which occurred during the day of salvation): And another angel came out of the temple, crying with a loud voice to him that sat on the cloud, Thrust in thy sickle [drepanon:G1407], and reap: for the time is come for thee to reap; for the harvest [therismos:G2326] of the earth is ripe. {16} And he that sat on the cloud thrust in his sickle [drepanon:G1407] on the earth; and the earth was reaped. 


  • There is an interesting verse in 1 Corinthians 15:20 that impinges on this study of “the delay” that we have also begun to explore:


But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits of them that slept. [koimao:G2837]


One key word is the term firstfruits or (aparche:G536), which corresponds to the Hebrew firstfruits or beginning, which is the word, Bere’shiyth (H7225/TWOT:2097e), and is actually the very first word in the book of Genesis, In the beginning. This is phenomenally relevant, because what happened before that statement, outside of time?  Christ rose from the dead at the foundation of the world  to become the firstfruits of them that slept as we just read in 1 Corinthians 15:20. 


  • We discovered that the term of them that slept or koimao (G2837) can refer to sleeping or death which sleeping can typify. This raises some important questions, which we still need to answer: 


  1. Who was sleeping when Christ rose from death and annihilation at the foundation of the world? 
  2. If we understand sleeping to be figurative of death, which individuals died when Christ was resurrected at the foundation of the world, when they had not even been created?


  • Historically we have looked at the events surrounding Lazarus’ resurrection as a picture of salvation (which it is of course), but why stop there, since Lazarus is featured prominently in John 21 as a type of the elect who are alive and remain (1 Thessalonians 4:15, 17) during the day of judgment? We investigated four key words in this passage, besides the term koimao (G2837) which is found twice in this passage as he sleep and sleepeth. Jesus was speaking of Lazarus having died, whereas the disciples thought he was napping, until the Lord explained that he had died. We gleaned the following from these four expressions:


  1. I may awake (him) out of sleep [exupnizo:G1852] is only found in John 11:11 and is derived from exupnos (G1853)
  2. Awaking out of his sleep [exupnos:G1853] only appears in the account of the Philippian jailer in Acts 16:27, which is a historical parable relating to the freeing of the (spiritual captives) by the day of judgment. This compound word is made up of the preposition ek (G1537), or “out” and hupnos (G5258) and is included in Romans 13:11 for instance.
  3. Taking of rest [koimesis:G2838] is the third word and only emerges in John 11:13.
  4. In sleep [hupnos:G5258] is also contained in John 11:13.  


  • There are also four key words in Romans 13:11, besides the expression sleep, or hupnos (G5258) And that, knowing the time [kairos:G2540], that now [it is] high time [hora:G5610] to awake [egeiro:G1453] out of [ek:G1537] sleep:[hupnos:G5258] for now [is] our salvation nearer [egguteron:G1452] than when we believed.


  1. Time [kairos:G2540] - a very significant term because of the Biblical Calendar and the spiritual implications in these next Scriptures: 

Romans 9:9 is a key passage in lieu of the deadness of Sara’s womb (as we read in Romans 4:19): For this [is] the word of promise, At this time [kairos:G2540] will I come, and Sara shall have a son.

Hebrews 11:11, Through faith also Sara herself received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age, [kairos:G2540] because she judged him faithful who had promised.

Romans 5:6 highlights this inability or deadness by this declaration according to God’s timing at the foundation of the world:  For when we were yet without strength, in due time [kairos:G2540] Christ died for the ungodly.

1 Timothy 2:6 presents Christ’s atonement for the elect at the foundation of the world: Who gave himself a ransom for all [i.e., the elect], to be testified in due time. [kairos:G2540] 


  1.  [It is] high time [hora:G5610]

Luke 23:44 is set in the context of judgment day, and includes the account of thief on the Savior’s right hand:  And it was about the sixth hour [hora:G5610], and there was a darkness over all the earth until the ninth hour.  [hora:G5610] 


  1. Awake/To Be Raised [egeiro:G1453]  

Mark 4:26-27, And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed [sporos:G4703] into the ground; {27} And should sleep [katheudo:G2518], and rise [egeiro:G1453]  night [nux:G3571] and day [hemera:G2250] and the seed [sporos:G4703]  should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how.

Acts 12:6-7, And when Herod would have brought him forth, the same night Peter was sleeping [koimao:G2837] between two soldiers, bound with two chains [halusis:G254] and the keepers before the door [thura:G2374] kept the prison. [phulake:G5438] {7} And, behold, the angel of the Lord came upon [him], and a light [phos:G5467] shined [lampo:G2989] in the prison [oikema:G3612]: and he smote Peter on the side, and raised [egeiro:G1453] him up [egeiro:G1453], saying, Arise up [anistemi:G450] quickly. And his chains [halusis:G254]  fell off from [his] hands.


  1. Nearer [egguteron:G1452] - only found in Romans 13:11. Stems from Near/Nigh [eggus:G1451]

Matthew 24:32-33 translates this word twice, and keep in mind that summer identifies with harvest: Now learn a parable of the fig tree; When his branch is yet tender, and putteth forth leaves, ye know that summer [is] nigh [eggus:G1451]: {33} So likewise ye, when ye shall see all these things, know that it is near [eggus:G1451], [even] at the doors.


I know I have presented quite a bit of information already in this series which is why I wanted to review it today. However at this point I would like to hone in on the following questions for the remainder of this series and explore them with you in greater detail, as all of this is new ground that we are uncovering:




  1. What is the spiritual significance of the two related expressions in the account of Lazarus (a type of the elect who are alive and remain today) in John 11: I may awake (him) out of sleep [exupnizo:G1852] which is only found in John 11:11 and is derived from exupnos (G1853) and Awaking out of his sleep [exupnos:G1853] only appears in the account of the Philippian jailer in Acts 16:27, which is a historical parable relating to the release of the spiritual captives (that typify the great multitude) by the day of judgment. 


  1. How are we to understand the term, time or kairos (G2540) in relation to the passage of time found in Romans 13:11 and in these next Scriptures, which like Lazarus in John 11 pertain to that which is  physically dead or to put it another way, devoid of spiritual life, which illustrates our world today, when God is no longer saving:


Romans 9:9 is a key passage in lieu of the deadness of Sara’s womb (as we read in Romans 4:19): For this [is] the word of promise, At this time [kairos:G2540] will I come, and Sara shall have a son.


Likewise, Hebrews 11:11 asserts: Through faith also Sara herself received strength to conceive seed, and was delivered of a child when she was past age, [kairos:G2540] because she judged him faithful who had promised.


Romans 5:6 highlights this spiritual inability or deadness by this declaration according to God’s timing at the foundation of the world:  For when we were yet without strength, in due time [kairos:G2540] Christ died for the ungodly.


  1. What are the  spiritual implications of 1 Corinthians 15:20, But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits of them that slept. [koimao:G2837] in lieu of the following questions: 1.) Who was sleeping when Christ rose from death and annihilation at the foundation of the world?  2.) If we understand sleeping to be figurative of death, which individuals died when Christ was resurrected at the foundation of the world, when they had not even been created


  1. Additionally, is there a spiritual link between 1 Corinthians 15:20 and Matthew 27:5-53, Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost. {51} And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; {52} And the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept [koimao:G2837] arose, {53} And came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, [“heaven”] and appeared unto many.

    


  1. Numbers 24:7 is an exceptional prophecy concerning the Lord Jesus Christ in light of the terms water(s) and seed; the term and great (in Isaiah 54:13) is rendered here as [shall be] in many: He shall pour the water out of his buckets, and his seed [shall be] in many [rab:H7227/TWOT:2099a, b] waters, and his king shall be higher than Agag, and his kingdom shall be exalted.


Similarly, Mark 4:26-29 also speaks of the seed (which points to both the Savior with a capital “S,” and also the Word of God)  which would have taken place during the “time of sowing” when salvation was still possible. Please note that the term harvest  is indicative of our present day: And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man [Christ in the Man] should cast seed [sporos:G4703]  into the ground; {27} And should sleep, and rise [egeiro:G1453] night [nux:G3571] and day [hemera:G2250], and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. {29} But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle [drepanon:G1407], because the harvest [therismos:G2326] is come.


  1. Do the above verses  tie in to the statement regarding the formation of the Body of Christ at the foundation of the world according to Psalm 139:11-16; and please note the unique interplay of light and darkness, and day and night: If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me. {12} Yea, the darkness hideth not from thee; but the night shineth as the day: the darkness and the light [are] both alike [to thee]. {13} For thou hast possessed my reins: thou hast covered me in my mother's womb. {14} I will praise thee; for I am fearfully [and] wonderfully made: marvellous [are] thy works; and [that] my soul knoweth right well. {15} My substance was not hid from thee, when I was made in secret, [and] curiously wrought in the lowest parts of the earth. {16} Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; and in thy book all [my members] were written, [which] in continuance were fashioned, when [as yet there was] none of them.


  1. Do the foregoing questions help us to answer the question:  in what way does this “two-step” passage of time in John 21 manifest itself with regard to the individual members of this great multitude becoming aware that something of a profound spiritual nature has already taken place in their souls?


I know that I have raised more questions than I have answers for, but I would encourage you to ponder these questions along with me as we will be examining each of these in detail in the weeks to come, Lord willing.


Please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing next.

The “Delay” - Part 8

March 21, 2021 


Welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship, and thank you for joining us today. Let’s begin by asking God for His blessing upon our time together... 


This will be The “Delay” - Part 8, and today's date is March 21, 2021. In our last study I said that for the remainder of this series we would focus on 7 main elements with respect to the “delay” in drawing the great multitude that were saved during the latter rain (from September 7, 1994 - May 21, 2011). Let’s explore the first two points:


  • What is the spiritual significance of the two related expressions in the account of Lazarus (a type of the elect who are alive and remain today) in John 11: I may awake (him) out of sleep [exupnizo:G1852] which is only found in John 11:11 and is derived from exupnos (G1853) or Awaking out of his sleep [exupnos:G1853], which only appears in the account of the Philippian jailer in Acts 16:27, which is a historical parable relating to the release of the spiritual captives (that typify the great multitude) by the day of judgment. 


  • How are we to understand the term, time or kairos (G2540) in relation to the passage of time found in Romans 13:11 and in these next Scriptures, which like Lazarus in John 11,  pertain to that which is  physically dead or to put it another way, devoid of spiritual life, which illustrates our world today, when God is no longer saving:


We noted in some of our previous studies that Lazarus typifies God’s elect on this earth who are alive and remain, according to 1 Thessalonians 4:15 and 17,


For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive [and] remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. ... {17} Then we which are alive [and] remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord. 


Besides being a type of God’s elect in judgment day, God also allows another portrait of Lazarus to emerge - that of having died (which the Savior characterized as “sleeping”) and then purposefully waiting for four days to elapse, before Christ raised him from the dead, which the Messiah expresses in these terms in John 11:11, I may awake [exupnizo:G1852][him] out of sleep. [exupnizo:G1852] And we learned that this word, exupnizo  is derived from G1853, or exupnos which like I may awake out of sleep is only found in one other verse, namely Acts 16:27. This passage has to do with the jailer at Philippi who was awak[ened] out of his sleep [exupnos:G1853]  by the earthquake which rocked the prison so that all the doors flung open, and yet all the prisoners remained in their cells - a tremendous portrait of the ...great multitude... that came out of great tribulation (Revelation 7:9 and 14), as Lazarus portrays as well. In turn, exupnos (G1853) is made up of the preposition ek (G1537), or out and hupnos (G5258) or sleep and is included in John 11:11(with regards to Lazarus) and in Romans 13:11 as two words - out of and sleep respectively: 


Howbeit Jesus spake of his death: but they thought that he had spoken of taking of rest in sleep. [hupnos:G5258]


And that, knowing the time [kairos:G2540], that now [it is] high time [hora:G5610] to awake [egeiro:G1453] out of [ek:G1537] sleep:[hupnos:G5258] for now [is] our salvation nearer [egguteron:G1452] than when we believed.


One of the reasons why Romans 13:11 is so significant is because it also contains the same word, sleep or hupnos (G5258) as in John 11:11, in addition to the following: 


  • Another term for awake, or egeiro (G1453) 
  • Two expressions for time: one is  kairos (G2540) and the other [it is] high time or hora (G5610), besides the words for salvation and nearer. 


We learned previously that kairos or time was used in Romans 9:9 and Hebrews 11:11 in which it explained the fact that God promised that Sarah would have a son (Isaac) even though that was physically impossible because of the time of life in view, as she was past age, so that God had to give her strength to conceive seed. The same was obviously true of her husband Abraham as well. This same truth also surfaced in Romans 5:6 in which God informs His elect that they too, were without strength, when the atonement took place at the foundation of the world, using the language ...in due time [kairos:G2540], Christ died for the ungodly.


  • Next I would like to take a closer look at Mark 4:26-29 again, which speaks of the seed (which points to the Savior with a capital “S,” and also the Word of God)  which would have taken place during the “time of sowing” when salvation was still possible. Please note that the term harvest  is indicative of our present day, as we understood that both sickle and harvest appear together in Revelation 14:15. 


And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man [Christ in the Man] should cast seed [sporos:G4703] into the ground; {27} And should sleep [katheudo:G2518], and rise [egeiro:G1453] night [nux:G3571] and day [hemera:G2250], and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring [blastano:G985] and grow up [mekuno:G3373], he knoweth not how. {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. {29} But when the fruit is brought forth, immediately he putteth in the sickle [drepanon:G1407], because the harvest [therismos:G2326] is come.


Mark 4:26-29 impinges on our present day, and for this reason  I would like us to consider some of the key words and phrases in this passage. That said, I still want to examine the term seed in this passage and elsewhere in both the Greek as well as the Hebrew (if not today in another lesson) because of its monumental significance throughout the entire Bible.


A Closer Look At Mark 4:26-29 




Luke 8:11 maintains, first and foremost, that the seed is the Word of God:


Now the parable is this: The seed is the word of God.


God is the Husbandman (or the Farmer, if you will) that plants the seed in the (good) ground which is the “heart” or soul of God’s elect, as Matthew 13:23 maintains:


But he that received seed into the good ground is he that heareth the word, and understandeth [it]; which also beareth fruit, and bringeth forth, some an hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty.   


The expression awake or egeiro (G1453) (as we saw in Romans 13:11), is rendered in Mark 4:27 as rise,


And should sleep [katheudo:G2518], and rise [egeiro:G1453] 

 night [nux:G3571] and day [hemera:G2250], and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring [blastano:G985] and grow up [mekuno:G3373], he knoweth not how.  


I’ll read Romans 13:11 again:


And that, knowing the time [kairos:G2540], that now [it is] high time [hora:G5610] to awake [egeiro:G1453] 

 out of [ek:G1537] sleep:[hupnos:G5258] for now [is] our salvation nearer [egguteron:G1452] than when we believed.


And Should Sleep [katheudo:G2518] & Rise [egeiro:G1453] 


The terms and should sleep along with rise in Mark 4:27 only appear together again in verse 14 of  Ephesians 5:13-16 which declares:


But all things that are reproved are made manifest by the light: for whatsoever doth make manifest is light. {14} Wherefore he saith, Awake [egeiro:G1453] thou that sleepest [katheudo:G2518], and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light. {15} See then that ye walk circumspectly, not as fools, but as wise, {16} Redeeming the time, because the days are evil.


This is another unique passage given the context of  “the days are evil.” And these two Greek words, days or hemera (G2250) [as we witnessed in John 11:9 twice, and in Mark 4:27] and evil or poneros (G4190), are only found together again in Ephesians 6:13 and rendered as evil day: 


Wherefore take unto you the whole armour of God, that ye may be able to withstand in the evil [poneros:G4190] day [hemera:G2250], and having done all, to stand.


The other curious thing is that the context of Ephesians 5 is a series of admonitions to the elect reminding them of their standing in Christ as verse 8 teaches:


For ye were sometimes darkness, but now [are ye] light in the Lord: walk as children of light:


So we wonder why it says awake thou that sleepest (since these individuals are not dead) but then it exhorts, rise from the dead, and finally it declares, and Christ shall give thee light.  


Could this be referring to the great multitude that God has saved prior to the door shutting, and that Christ is now awakening by His Word?


As you and I ponder that, let’s continue our discussion of the parable in Mark 4:26-29, and the two words that are associated with the germination of the seed in the ground, which are: should spring or blastano (G985), along with grow up, or mekuno (G3373)  These two terms are only found together in this verse, so we will have to examine them individually.


Should Spring [blastano:G985] 


The expression should spring or blastano crops up in three other notices, having to do with bringing forth fruit, or budding:


Matthew 13:26 reveals: But when the blade was sprung up, [blastano:G985] and brought forth fruit, then appeared the tares also.


Hebrews 9:4 is especially relevant to our topic, and is a commentary on Numbers 17:8 and please note the miracle of life stemming from a (lifeless) branch that had been cut off of an almond tree: Which had the golden censer, and the ark of the covenant overlaid round about with gold, wherein [was] the golden pot that had manna, and Aaron's rod that budded, [blastano:G985] and the tables of the covenant;


Numbers 17:8 provides us with a “word-bridge” back to the Old Testament, so we can compare it with Hebrews 9:4,  



And it came to pass, that on the morrow Moses went into the tabernacle of witness; and, behold, the rod of Aaron for the house of Levi was budded [parach:H6524/TWOT*:1813,1814, 181], and brought forth [yatsa’:H3318/TWOT:893] buds [perach:H6524/TWOT:1813a], and bloomed [tsuwts:H6692/TWOT:1893, 1894] blossoms [tsiyts:H6731/TWOT:1911], and yielded [gamal:H1580/TWOT:360] almonds. [shaqed:H8247/TWOT:2451a]


Lastly, verse 18 of James 5:17-18 records this about the prophet Elijah which underscores the periods of spiritual famine that preceded the early (Pentecostal) rain as well as the latter rain:  Elias was a man subject to like passions as we are, and he prayed earnestly that it might not rain: and it rained not on the earth by the space of three years and six months. {18} And he prayed again, and the heaven gave rain, and the earth brought forth [blastano:G985] her fruit.


*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (TWOT)


Grow Up [mekuno:G3373]


The word, grow up or mekuno is only included in this verse, but the parent word, mekos (G3372) that it stems from, is certainly worth investigating; we find it in  only in a couple of Scriptures:


Verse 18 of Ephesians 3:14-19 renders this word as length: For this cause I bow my knees unto the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, {15} Of whom the whole family in heaven and earth is named, {16} That he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, to be strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man; {17} That Christ may dwell in your hearts by faith; that ye, being rooted [rhizoo:G4492] and grounded in love, {18} May be able to comprehend with all saints what [is] the breadth, and length, [mekos:G3372] and depth, and height; {19} And to know the love of Christ, which passeth knowledge, that ye might be filled with all the fulness of God. 


Verse 16 of Revelation 21:10-16 likewise affirms the same twice regarding that great city, the holy Jerusalem, descending out of heaven from God, Having the glory of God:  And he carried me away in the spirit to a great and high mountain, and shewed me that great city, the holy Jerusalem, descending out of heaven from God, {11} Having the glory of God: and her light [was] like unto a stone most precious, even like a jasper stone, clear as crystal; {12} And had a wall great and high, [and] had twelve gates, and at the gates twelve angels, and names written thereon, which are [the names] of the twelve tribes of the children of Israel: {13} On the east three gates; on the north three gates; on the south three gates; and on the west three gates. {14} And the wall of the city had twelve foundations, and in them the names of the twelve apostles of the Lamb. {15} And he that talked with me had a golden reed to measure the city, and the gates thereof, and the wall thereof. {16} And the city lieth foursquare, and the length [mekos:G3372] is as large as the breadth: and he measured the city with the reed, twelve thousand furlongs. The length [mekos:G3372] and the breadth and the height of it are equal.


Incidentally, I would like to single out one word in Ephesians 3:17 that ties into our study, which is ye being rooted  or [rhizoo:G4492]

 

Ye Being Rooted [rhizoo:G4492] 


The word, ye being rooted or rhizoo only emerges again in Colossians 2:7,


Rooted [rhizoo:G4492] and built up in him, and stablished in the faith, as ye have been taught, abounding therein with thanksgiving.


Rhizoo is a verb that stems from the noun form, rhiza (G4491)  which is a most important word which I have highlighted at various times. For example it arises it the following citations:


Romans 15:12 is a quotation taken from Isaiah 11:1 and 10 and ties back to the Hebrew word for root, or shoresh. This is highly significant as the shoresh forms the basis for the majority of all Hebrew roots, which is made up primarily of three consonants (although at times one finds two consonants, or even one): 


And again, Esaias saith, There shall be a root [rhiza:G4491] of Jesse, and he that shall rise to reign over the Gentiles; in him shall the Gentiles trust.


Revelation  5:5 adds:  And one of the elders saith unto me, Weep not: behold, the Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root [rhiza:G4491] of David, hath prevailed to open the book, and to loose the seven seals thereof.


And Revelation 22:16 further affirms: I Jesus have sent mine angel to testify unto you these things in the churches. I am the root [rhiza:G4491] and the offspring of David, [and] the bright and morning star.


The Greek Rhiza (Root) Corresponds To The Hebrew Sheresh (Root)


Here are some of the Old Testament references that contain this word sheresh (H8328/TWOT:2471a), and please note this root metaphor, that underscores the Person and Work of God the Son:


Isaiah 11:1 and 10 maintain: And there shall come forth a rod out of the stem of Jesse, and a Branch shall grow out of his roots: [sheresh:H8328/TWOT:2471a] ... {10} And in that day there shall be a root of Jesse, which shall stand for an ensign of the people; to it shall the Gentiles seek: and his rest shall be glorious.


Isaiah 53:2 acknowledges: For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root [sheresh:H8328/TWOT:2471a] out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, [there is] no beauty that we should desire him.


Reminding us of Mark 4:26-29, Isaiah 37:31 uses the same analogy with regards to the remnant, or God’s elect people: And the remnant that is escaped of the house of Judah shall again take root [sheresh:H8328/TWOT:2471a] downward, and bear fruit upward:


Verse 8 of Jeremiah 17:7-8 is similar to Psalm 1, and emphasizes this same idea of growth and fruitfulness:  Blessed [is] the man that trusteth in the LORD, and whose hope the LORD is. {8} For he shall be as a tree planted by the waters, and [that] spreadeth out her roots [sheresh:H8328/TWOT:2471a] by the river, and shall not see when heat cometh, but her leaf shall be green; and shall not be careful in the year of drought, neither shall cease from yielding fruit.  


The last phrase in Mark 4:27 is he knoweth not how, which is composed of four terms.


He [autos:G846] Knoweth [eido:G1492] Not [ou:G3756] How [hos:G5613]  


These four expressions appear in five other references, and curiously one of them is in John 11:32, and ties back to Lazarus:


Then when [hos:G5613] Mary was come where Jesus was, and saw [eido:G1492] him [autos:G846], she fell down at his [autos:G846] feet, saying unto him [autos:G846], Lord, if thou hadst been here, my brother had not [ou:G3756] died. 


Actually Martha (the sister of Mary who was the one that anointed the Lord in preparation of His burial according to John 11:2) said the same thing in verse 21of John 11:21-24,


Then said Martha unto Jesus, Lord, if thou hadst been here, my brother had not died. {22{ But I know, that even now, whatsoever thou wilt ask of God, God will give [it] thee. {23} Jesus saith unto her, Thy brother shall rise again. {24} Martha saith unto him, I know that he shall rise again in the resurrection at in [this is primarily how it is translated and comports with the prolonged last “day”] the last day.


Now let’s turn our attention to some of the main terms found in Mark 4:28 which are: bringeth forth fruit...the blade... the ear... and full corn.


Bringeth Forth Fruit [karpophoreo:G2592] 


The word, bringeth forth fruit or karpophoreo  surfaces in seven other passages, and we will consider just one of them, which is Luke 8:15, which is a parallel account of the parable of the Sower. Keep in mind that we have understood this verse in light of the day of salvation, which is correct, but there is also an application for the day of judgment having to do with those who heard the Word prior to “the door of salvation” shutting, as we will learn by looking at the terms, keep [it], and patience: 


But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word [logos:G3056], keep [it] [katecho:G2722], and bring forth fruit [karpophoreo:G2592] with patience. [hupomone:G5281]


Keep [It] [katecho:G2722] 


One of the nuances of this expression keep [it], or katecho, is that of holding fast or possessing as the subsequent verses indicate:


Romans 7:6 notes the contrast between the life of one of God’s children before salvation, and after salvation:  But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; [katecho:G2722] that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not [in] the oldness of the letter.


1 Thessalonians 5:21, Prove all things; hold fast [katecho:G2722] that which is good.


Hebrews 3:6 and 14 assert: But Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we, if we hold fast [katecho:G2722] the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm unto the end. ... {14} For we are made partakers of Christ, if we hold [katecho:G2722] the beginning of our confidence stedfast unto the end;


Hebrews 10:23 likewise adds: Let us hold fast [katecho:G2722] the profession of [our] faith without wavering; (for he [is] faithful that promised;)


We must bear in mind that this idea of holding fast is not something that the genuine Christian does by his own strength or willpower. This is all the action of God, as God, among other places, confirms in Jude 24-25, even though a different word for to keep (phulasso:G5442) is employed:


Now unto him that is able to keep [phulasso:G5442] you from falling, and to present [you] faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy, {25} To the only wise God our Saviour, [be] glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and ever. Amen.


This is also reiterated in John 17:12 in which it is rendered I have kept: 


While I was with them in the world, I kept them in thy name: those that thou gavest me I have kept, [phulasso:G5442] and none of them is lost, but the son of perdition; that the scripture might be fulfilled.


On that very hopeful note, we will have to stop here. Lord willing, we will continue our examination of Mark 4:26-29, as I want to spend extra time on the various Greek and Hebrew words for seed, as I mentioned earlier in today’s study.


Please stay tuned for our Hymn Sing. 

The “Delay” - Part 9

 March 28, 2021 


Welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship, and thank you for joining us today. Let’s begin by asking God for His blessing upon our time together... 


This will be The “Delay” - Part 9, and today's date is March 28, 2021. As I mentioned at the close of last week’ study we want to conclude our investigation of Mark 4:26-29 which I will quote again,


And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man [Christ in the Man] should cast seed [sporos:G4703] into the ground; {27} And should sleep [katheudo:G2518], and rise [egeiro:G1453] night [nux:G3571] and day [hemera:G2250], and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring [blastano:G985] and grow up [mekuno:G3373], he knoweth not how. {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit [karpophoreo:G2592] 

 of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. {29} But when the fruit [karpos:G2590] is brought forth [paradidomi:G3860], immediately he putteth in the sickle [drepanon:G1407], because the harvest [therismos:G2326] is come.


We are interested in this parable concerning the Kingdom of God because it involves the “seed” (which is the Word of God) that was planted in the (good ground) of the hearts or souls of God’s elect during the day of salvation with respect to the great multitude specifically that God saved during the “latter rain,” [(the last 17 years of the Great Tribulation from 1994-2011) even though there is application to all that God saved during the day of salvation as we have learned in this study regarding the passage of time in the “drawing” process.]  These individuals are “sleeping” as the Lord described Lazarus, but unlike Lazarus, they are not physically dead; but nonetheless they “under ground”in the soil. We also must remember that Lazarus represents the believer in the day of judgment, as he is prominently featured in John 21. Remember too that the name Lazarus stems from the Hebrew, Eleazar (H499), which is a compound word made up of El (H410) or God and `azar (H5826/TWOT:1598), which is the verb, to help; in other words, “God helps.”

Help/Helper [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598] 


Here are some of the ways that God employs this verb, help or helper:


An excellent example of this word is found in verse 5 of Psalm 46:1-11which is set in the context of our present day of judgment; this term is rendered as shall help:  


[To the chief Musician for the sons of Korah, A Song upon Alamoth.] God [is] our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. {2} Therefore will not we fear, though the earth be removed, and though the mountains be carried into the midst of the sea; {3} [Though] the waters thereof roar [and] be troubled, [though] the mountains shake with the swelling thereof. Selah. {4} [There is] a river, the streams whereof shall make glad the city of God, the holy [place] of the tabernacles of the most High. {5} God [is] in the midst of her; she shall not be moved: God shall help [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598]  her, [and that] right early. {6} The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: he uttered his voice, the earth melted. {7} The LORD of hosts [is] with us; the God of Jacob [is] our refuge. Selah. {8} Come, behold the works of the LORD, what desolations he hath made in the earth. {9} He maketh wars to cease unto the end of the earth; he breaketh the bow, and cutteth the spear in sunder; he burneth the chariot in the fire. {10} Be still, and know that I [am] God: I will be exalted among the heathen, I will be exalted in the earth. {11} The LORD of hosts [is] with us; the God of Jacob [is] our refuge. Selah.


Psalm 10:14 acknowledges this, and please note the expression, the fatherless (along with widows and orphans) refer to God’s elect during the day of salvation prior to their salvation:  Thou hast seen [it]; for thou beholdest mischief and spite, to requite [it] with thy hand: the poor committeth himself unto thee; thou art the helper [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598] of the fatherless.


Psalm 30:10 expresses this as thou my helper: Hear, O LORD, and have mercy upon me: LORD, be thou my helper. [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598]


Psalm 79:9 translates this simply as help: Help [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598]

 us, O God of our salvation, for the glory of thy name: and deliver us, and purge away our sins, for thy name's sake.


Isaiah 41:10 and 13-14 declares God’s faithfulness to His chosen people; please the three fold repetition I will help/will help along with fear not, plus the additional statements, I will strengthen thee and I will uphold thee:  Fear thou not; for I [am] with thee: be not dismayed; for I [am] thy God: I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help [`azar:H5826/TWOT*:1598] thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right hand of my righteousness. ... {13} For I the LORD thy God will hold thy right hand, saying unto thee, Fear not; I will help [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598]  thee. {14} Fear not, thou worm Jacob, [and] ye men of Israel; I will help [`azar:H5826/TWOT:1598]

thee, saith the LORD, and thy redeemer, the Holy One of Israel.


Verse 5 of  Isaiah 63:1-6 explains why God is the only One who can help with regard to salvation, within the context of the day of judgment:


Who [is] this that cometh from Edom, with dyed garments from Bozrah? this [that is] glorious in his apparel, travelling in the greatness of his strength? I that speak in righteousness, mighty to save. {2} Wherefore [art thou] red in thine apparel, and thy garments like him that treadeth in the winefat? {3} I have trodden the winepress alone; and of the people [there was] none with me: [this is a dual allusion to the atonement “at the foundation of the world,” as well as Christ’s role as the “Author and Finisher of faith”] for I will tread them in mine anger, and trample them in my fury; and their blood shall be sprinkled upon my garments, and I will stain all my raiment. {4} For the day of vengeance [is] in mine heart, and the year of my redeemed is come. {5} And I looked, and [there was] none to help; and I wondered that [there was] none to uphold: therefore mine own arm brought salvation unto me; and my fury, it upheld me. {6} And I will tread down the people in mine anger, and make them drunk in my fury, and I will bring down their strength to the earth. 


*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (TWOT)


With that in mind, let’s return to the last part of Mark 4:28 to examine this phrase,  ...of herself [automatos:G844]; first [proton:G4412] the blade [chortos:G5528], then [eita:G1534] the ear [stachus:G4719], after [eita:G1534]  that [eita:G1534]  the full [pleres:G4134] corn [sitos:G4621] in the ear. [stachus:G4719]


Of Herself [automatos:G844]


The word, of herself (referring to the earth) or automatos (from which we get some of our English words, such as automated) only occurs in one other significant citation which we have already encountered, namely in verse 10 of Acts 12:6-10, and is rendered as of his own accord, in which the same word for sleeping or koimao (G2837) appears in John 11 in connection with Lazarus: 


And when Herod would have brought him forth, the same night Peter was sleeping [koimao:G2837] between two soldiers, bound with two chains: and the keepers before the door kept the prison. {7} And, behold, the angel of the Lord came upon [him], and a light shined in the prison: and he smote Peter on the side, and raised [egeiro:G1453] him up [egeiro:G1453], saying, Arise up quickly. And his chains fell off from [his] hands. {8} And the angel said unto him, Gird thyself, and bind on thy sandals. And so he did. And he saith unto him, Cast thy garment about thee, and follow me. {9} And he went out, and followed him; and wist not that it was true which was done by the angel; but thought he saw a vision. {10} When they were past the first and the second ward, they came unto the iron gate that leadeth unto the city; which opened to them of his own accord [automatos:G844]: and they went out, and passed on through one street; and forthwith the angel departed from him. 


I want to once again remind you (and me) of the notable expression in verse 7, and raised up or egeiro (G1453), which is found in these extremely relevant Scriptures that we don’t want to forget:


1 Corinthians 15:20 includes this expression as is risen along with the same word for sleeping or koimao, translated as of them that slept: But now is [egeiro:G1453][G0] Christ risen [egeiro:G1453] from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits of them that slept. [koimao:G2837]


John 12:1 also renders this term as he raised: Then Jesus six days before the passover came to Bethany, where Lazarus was which had been dead, whom he raised [egeiro:G1453] from the dead.


Romans 13:11 translates this word as awake, and please note the dual time references, time and [it is] high time which we have discussed previously: And that, knowing the time, that now [it is] high time to awake [egeiro:G1453] out of sleep: for now [is] our salvation nearer than when we believed.


Ephesians 5:14 expresses this word as awake thou: Wherefore he saith, Awake thou [egeiro:G1453] that sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall give thee light.


It seems to me that these four passages are super important regarding this doctrine of the delay in drawing the great multitude that God saved prior to the door of salvation shutting at least up to this point in my understanding, although as we have discovered they impinge on a number of other passages as well. Let’s continue our research into the second half of  Mark 4:28 which I will repeat, and please note the progression of the development of the seed in the ground:


...of herself [automatos:G844]; first [proton:G4412] the blade [chortos:G5528], then [eita:G1534] the ear [stachus:G4719], after [eita:G1534]  that [eita:G1534]  the full [pleres:G4134] corn [sitos:G4621] in the ear. [stachus:G4719]


First [proton:G4412]


The Greek adverb, first, is found in 61 places, and can denote first in importance, time, order, and place, etc.; it stems from the Greek adjective, protos (G4413). Here are some examples of its usage, and in all of these references, this word is translated first:  


Matthew 13:30 records: Let both grow together until the harvest: and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first [proton:G4412] the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.


In Mark 3:27 it is used in connection with the binding of Satan at the Cross: No man can enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he will first [proton:G4412] bind the strong man; and then he will spoil his house.


2 Thessalonians 2:3 likewise affirms: Let no man deceive you by any means: for [that day shall not come], except there come a falling away first, [proton:G4412] and that man of sin be revealed, the son of perdition;


And 2 Timothy 1:5 says: When I call to remembrance the unfeigned faith that is in thee, which dwelt first [proton:G4412] in thy grandmother Lois, and thy mother Eunice; and I am persuaded that in thee also.


Verse 17 of 1 Peter 4:17-18 reveals the timing of God’s judgment: For the time [is come] that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if [it] first [proton:G4412] [begin] at us, what shall the end [be] of them that obey not the gospel of God? {18} And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?


Verse 20 of 2 Peter 1:20-21 asserts: Knowing this first, [proton:G4412] that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. {21} For the prophecy came not in old time by the will of man: but holy men of God spake [as they were] moved by the Holy Ghost. 


Verse 3 of 2 Peter 3:3-4 teaches: Knowing this first, [proton:G4412] that there shall come in the last days scoffers, walking after their own lusts, {4} And saying, Where is the promise of his coming? for since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as [they were] from the beginning of the creation.


The Blade [chortos:G5528]


The blade is the first thing that emerges out of the soil in this parable. This word in primarily rendered as grass, and to a much lesser extent as blade or hay, according to these next citations:


In John 6:10 this word grass is linked to the “feeding” of the five thousand: And Jesus said, Make the men sit down. Now there was much grass [chortos:G5528] in the place. So the men sat down, in number about five thousand.


1 Corinthians 3:6-13 is especially pertinent to what is taking place today which points to the fiery trial, in which all are being tested to see what spiritual material they are made of; please note the context of this verse which is found within another agricultural analogy like Mark 4:26-29. This word is expressed as hay in verse 12:  


I have planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase. {7} So then neither is he that planteth any thing, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase. {8} Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour. {9} For we are labourers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, [ye are] God's building. {10} According to the grace of God which is given unto me, as a wise masterbuilder, I have laid the foundation, and another buildeth thereon. But let every man take heed how he buildeth thereupon. {11} For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ. {12} Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay,[chortos:G5528] stubble;


Verse 10 of  James 1:10-11 also uses a similar metaphor, reminding one of one of the unfruitful “soils” in the Parable of the Sower in Matthew 13; the term rich or rich man refers to the non-elect, who can be materially wealthy, or the unrighteous who think they are spiritually prosperous, but in actuality are not: 


But the rich, in that he is made low: because as the flower of the grass [chortos:G5528] he shall pass away. {11} For the sun is no sooner risen with a burning heat, but it withereth the grass, [chortos:G5528] and the flower thereof falleth, and the grace of the fashion of it perisheth: so also shall the rich man fade away in his ways.


However in Revelation 8:7 the grass in view is related to the third part of trees which points to God’s judgment that fell upon His own house first: The first angel sounded, and there followed hail and fire mingled with blood, and they were cast upon the earth: and the third part of trees was burnt up, and all green grass [chortos:G5528] was burnt up.


Lastly Revelation 9:4 concerns the locusts (which typify God’s elect in the day of judgment) as well as God’s people (note their dual roles) who are also characterized as the grass of the earth, neither any green thing, neither any tree: And it was commanded them that they should not hurt the grass [chortos:G5528] of the earth, neither any green thing, neither any tree; but only those men which have not the seal of God in their foreheads. [i.e., the non-elect]


Then [eita:G1534] 


The word, then or that emerges in Mark 4:28 twice, and is actually a key word because it also relates to the passage of time, as the following notices underscore; the first two passages are the parallel accounts of the Parable of the Sower:


Mark 4:17 testifies: And have no root in themselves, and so endure but for a time: afterward, [eita:G1534] when affliction or persecution ariseth for the word's sake, immediately they are offended.


Similarly, Luke 8:12 acknowledges: Those by the way side are they that hear; then [eita:G1534] cometh the devil, and taketh away the word out of their hearts, lest they should believe and be saved.



Verse 8 of Mark 8:22-25 renders this as after that. This is a most unique account of the Lord healing a blind man, seemingly “in stages,” which is out of the norm whenever the Lord healed anybody, so we wonder if this could possibly relate to the delay in drawing today


And he cometh to Bethsaida [G966]; and they bring a blind man unto him, and besought him to touch him. {23} And he took the blind man by the hand, and led him out of the town; and when he had spit on his eyes, and put his hands upon him, he asked him if he saw ought. {24} And he looked up, and said, I see men as trees, walking.{25} After that [eita:G1534] he put [his] hands again upon his eyes, and made him look up: and he was restored, and saw every man clearly.


The word Bethsaida [(Aramaic) “house of fish” or “house of hunting”] is on the western shore of the Sea known as Galilee, Tiberias, and Gennesaret (which means harp, and is a figure of the Word of God); this where Jesus frequently taught and performed many of His miracles, and formed the basis for the Great Commission of “fishing for men.” Bethsaida is Aramaic in origin and is a compound word, made up of the term for house (bayith:H1004) and hunter (tsayad:H6719). This expression, hunter, only appears in Jeremiah 16:16,


Behold, I will send for many fishers, saith the LORD, and they shall fish them; and after will I send for many hunters [tsayad:H6719/TWOT:], and they shall hunt them from every mountain, and from every hill, and out of the holes of the rocks.


1 Corinthians 15:5, 7, and 24 also include this word, then; please note the chronology in view: And that he was seen of Cephas, then [eita:G1534] of the twelve: ... {7} After that, he was seen of James; then [eita:G1534] of all the apostles. ... {24} Then [eita:G1534] [cometh] the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power.


In similar fashion, 1 Timothy 2:13 makes this pronouncement: For Adam was first formed, then [eita:G1534] Eve.


Last but certainly not least, verse 15 of James 1:14-15 marks the progression of time with respect to the effects of sin on a person’s life:  But every man is tempted, when he is drawn away of his own lust, and enticed. Then [G1534] when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death.


I think we’ll stop here for today. Lord willing, in our next study we will finish our analysis of Mark 4:26-29, and then consider the term seed. Please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.

The “Delay” - Part 10

 April 4, 2021 


Welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship, and thank you for joining us today. Let’s begin by asking God for His blessing upon our time together... 


This will be The “Delay” - Part 10, and today's date is April 4, 2021. We have spent the last few Sundays examining Mark 4:26-29, which states: 


And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed [sporos:G4703] into the ground; {27} And should sleep, and rise night and day and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear [stachus:G4719], after that  the full [pleres:G4134] corn [sitos:G4621] in the ear. [stachus:G4719] {29} But when the fruit [karpos:G2590] is brought forth [paradidomi:G3860], immediately [eutheos:G2112] he putteth in [apostello:G649] the sickle [drepanon:G1407], because [hoti:G3754] the harvest [therismos:G2326] is come. [paristemi:G3936]


In Part 9 we stopped at the word, the ear (G4719) or stachus in verse 28, in which it appears twice. This expression only emerges in three other parallel verses that have to do with the plucking, rubbing, and eating of the grain on the Sabbath, when the disciples were hungry. This action naturally prompted a response from the Pharisees, which is turn gave the Lord the opportunity to teach that He is the Lord of the Sabbath, and spiritually foreshadowing the purpose of the Sunday Sabbath, which is to feed upon the Word of God, typified by the grain or corn:


Matthew 12:1 records: At that time Jesus went on the sabbath day through the corn; and his disciples were an hungred, and began to pluck the ears of corn, [stachus:G4719] and to eat.


Mark 2:23 likewise reveals: And it came to pass, that he went through the corn fields on the sabbath day; and his disciples began, as they went, to pluck the ears of corn. [stachus:G4719]


Luke 6:1 adds the important detail of rubbing: And it came to pass on the second sabbath after the first, that he went through the corn fields; and his disciples plucked the ears of corn, [stachus:G4719] and did eat, rubbing [psocho:G5597][them] in [their] hands.


The term, rubbing or psocho is only found in this passage, however it is related to a word that also has to do with “plucking” stringed instruments and singing; it arises in the following citations as making melody or singing: 


Sing/Making Melody [psallo:G5567]


Romans 15:9 extols:  And that the Gentiles might glorify God for [his] mercy; as it is written, For this cause I will confess to thee among the Gentiles, and sing [psallo:G5567] unto thy name.


1 Corinthians 14:15 likewise affirms:  What is it then? I will pray with the spirit, and I will pray with the understanding also: I will sing [psallo:G5567] with the spirit, and I will sing [psallo:G5567] with the understanding also.


Ephesians 5:19 reiterates this same theme: Speaking to yourselves in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody [psallo:G5567] in your heart to the Lord;


James 5:13 gives this wise counsel: Is any among you afflicted? let him pray. Is any merry? let him sing psalms. [psallo:G5567]


As you can see there is a definite relationship with feeding on the Scriptures and the heartfelt response of worshipping and exalting God by musical instruments and singing. (The greatest instrument being the human voice.) This is also seen in Hebrew by the expression zamar [H2167/TWOT:558] that incorporates this same idea of both plucking and singing, according to quite a number of verses; here are a few examples:


Psalm 33:2 asserts: Praise the LORD with harp [kinnowr:H3658]: sing [zamar:H2167/TWOT*:558]  unto him with the psaltery [and] an instrument of ten strings.


And Psalm 71:22 reveals:  I will also praise thee with the psaltery, [even] thy truth, O my God: unto thee will I sing [zamar:H2167/TWOT:558] with the harp [kinnowr:H3658], O thou Holy One of Israel.


Psalm 144:9, I will sing a new song unto thee, O God: upon a psaltery [and] an instrument of ten strings will I sing praises [zamar:H2167/TWOT:558]  unto thee.


Please note the word, harp or kinnowr, which is transliterated in Greek as Gennesaret, and as I have mentioned before, is another name for the Sea of Galilee or Tiberias, (which is in the shape of a  harp), and spiritually the harp indicates declaring the Word of Truth, as Psalm 71:22 includes this word, thy truth, reminding us of John 17:17, Sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth.


The next two expressions that we want to examine are: the full referring to the corn in the ear, which are only found together here, so we will have to consider them individually:


The Full [pleres:G4134]


This expression is used in a variety of different contexts, as the subsequent Scriptures reveal:


Most notably, two of them highlight the “fullness” of the Lord Jesus Christ in Luke 4:2 and John 1:14 respectively:


Luke 4:1 acknowledges: And Jesus being full [pleres:G4134] of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness,


*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (TWOT)


And John 1:14 declares: And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full [pleres:G4134] of grace and truth.


These next references underscore the “fullness” of various objects, including: fragments (of the loaves and fish), leprosy,  faith and power, good works and almsdeeds, of all subtility and all mischief, and of wrath: 


In Mark 8:19, the Savior poses this question to His disciples: When I brake the five loaves among five thousand, how many baskets full [pleres:G4134] of fragments took ye up? They say unto him, Twelve.


Luke 5:12 records: And it came to pass, when he was in a certain city, behold a man full [pleres:G4134] of leprosy: who seeing Jesus fell on [his] face, and besought him, saying, Lord, if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean.


Acts 6:8 is a description of God’s work of grace in Stephen’s life:  And Stephen, full [pleres:G4134] of faith and power, did great wonders and miracles among the people.


Similarly, Acts 9:36 characterizes what God did through Tabitha or Dorcas:  Now there was at Joppa a certain disciple named Tabitha, which by interpretation is called Dorcas: this woman was full [pleres:G4134] of good works and almsdeeds which she did.


By contrast, Acts 13:10 reveals the nature of Elymas the sorcerer:  And said, O full [pleres:G4134] of all subtilty and all mischief, [thou] child of the devil, [thou] enemy of all righteousness, wilt thou not cease to pervert the right ways of the Lord?


Acts 19:28 depicts the sentiment of most of the inhabitants of Ephesus: And when they heard [these sayings], they were full [pleres:G4134] of wrath, and cried out, saying, Great [is] Diana of the Ephesians.


Lastly, verse 8 of 2 John 1:6-8 presents this admonition: And this is love, that we walk after his commandments. This is the commandment, That, as ye have heard from the beginning, ye should walk in it. {7} For many deceivers are entered into the world, who confess not that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh. This is a deceiver and an antichrist. {8} Look to yourselves, that we lose not those things which we have wrought, but that we receive a full [pleres:G4134] reward.


2 John 1:8 reminds one of the Old Testament term, a full or  maskoret found in connection with Ruth the Moabitess and this conversation between her husband-to-be, Boaz, both of which typify the Bride of Christ and the Messiah in verse 12 of  Ruth 2:10-12, 


Then she fell on her face, and bowed herself to the ground, and said unto him, Why have I found grace in thine eyes, that thou shouldest take knowledge of me, seeing I [am] a stranger? {11} And Boaz answered and said unto her, It hath fully been shewed me, all that thou hast done unto thy mother in law since the death of thine husband: and [how] thou hast left thy father and thy mother, and the land of thy nativity, and art come unto a people which thou knewest not heretofore. {12} The LORD recompense thy work, and a full reward [maskoret:H4909/TWOT:2264.1d] be given thee of the LORD God of Israel, under whose wings thou art come to trust.


The root of this word,  maskoret, stems from the Hebrew  expression for wages. 


Corn [sitos:G4621]


The term, corn or sitos,  is found in 13 other places, as these next references illustrate:


John 12:24 translates this word of wheat: Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.


Verse 37 of 1 Corinthians 15:36-38 also renders this expression of wheat: Thou fool, that which thou sowest is not quickened, except it die:

{37}And that which thou sowest, thou sowest not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may chance of wheat [sitos:G4621], or of some other grain:{38} But God giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every seed his own body.


Let’s read Mark 4:26-29 again:


And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed [sporos:G4703] into the ground; {27} And should sleep, and rise night and day and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how. {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear [stachus:G4719], after that  the full [pleres:G4134] corn [sitos:G4621] in the ear. [stachus:G4719] {29} But when the fruit [karpos:G2590] is brought forth [paradidomi:G3860], immediately [eutheos:G2112] he putteth in [apostello:G649] the sickle [drepanon:G1407], because [hoti:G3754] the harvest [therismos:G2326] is come. [paristemi:G3936]


Is Brought Forth [paradidomi:G3860]


The expression is brought forth or paradidomi  having to do with the fruit is an important one. We find it in for instance in the following passages:



Matthew 11:27 renders this word as are delivered: All things are delivered [paradidomi:G3860] unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and [he] to whomsoever the Son will reveal [apokalupto:G601] [him].


Mark 13:11 is set in the context of the unsealing of various doctrines that God has revealed to His people since the beginning of the Great Tribulation in 1988: 


But when they shall lead [you], and deliver [paradidomi:G3860][G0] you up, [paradidomi:G3860] take no thought beforehand what ye shall speak, neither do ye premeditate: but whatsoever shall be given you in that hour, that speak ye: for it is not ye that speak, but the Holy Ghost.


2 Corinthians 4:11 highlights what is taking place in the day of judgment, when God’s elect throughout the world are following the same pattern of suffering that the their God and King subjected Himself to, during His earthly ministry: 


For we which live are [paradidomi:G3860][G0] alway delivered [paradidomi:G3860] unto death for Jesus' sake, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our mortal flesh.


One of the interesting aspects of the day of judgment in which this reaping process is occurring is that the elect are typified as “plants” in various stages of growth - blade...ear...full corn in the ear - so that they are not all at the same level of “ripeness,” as it were throughout this prolonged day of judgment. Nonetheless when they are fully mature, and this brings us to this last phrase in verse 29, ...immediately he putteth in the sickle because the harvest is come. So let’s consider the two words, immediately and he putteth in:


Immediately [eutheos:G2112] 


Luke 17:7 points to our present day of judgment, and this new commission of “feeding sheep” that God has assigned to His chosen people: But which of you, having a servant plowing or feeding cattle, will say unto him by and by, [eutheos:G2112] when he is come from the field, Go and sit down to meat?


He Putteth In [apostello:G649] 


Matthew 24:31 underscores this task of reaping that God’s elect - who are the messengers or angels - are to perform:  And he shall send [apostello:G649] his angels with a great sound of a trumpet, and they shall gather together his elect from the four winds, from one end of heaven to the other.


John 4:38 renders this term as I sent: I sent [apostello:G649] you to reap that whereon ye bestowed no labour: other men laboured, and ye are entered into their labours.


Before leaving Mark 4:26-29, we do need to consider the expression seed or sporos (G4703) found in verses 26-27.


Seed [sporos:G4703] 


This term, seed or sporos only emerges is three other Scriptures:


Luke 8:5 and 11 is another account of the parable of the Sower and the Seed: A sower went out to sow his seed: [sporos:G4703] and as he sowed, some fell by the way side; and it was trodden down, and the fowls of the air devoured it. ... {11} Now the parable is this: The seed [sporos:G4703] is the word of God.


2 Corinthians 9:10 declares: Now he that ministereth seed [sporos:G4703]  to the sower both minister bread for [your] food, and multiply your seed sown [sporos:G4703], and increase the fruits of your righteousness;)


2 Corinthians 9:10 is quoting Isaiah 55:10 which affirms: For as the rain cometh down, and the snow from heaven, and returneth not thither, but watereth the earth, and maketh it bring forth and bud, that it may give seed [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a - noun - stems from the verb H2232] to the sower, [zara`:H2232/TWOT:582] and bread to the eater:

 

Both forms also appear in Psalm 126:5-6, which shows the distinction between the day of salvation (a time of weeping and sowing) and the day of judgment (a time of rejoicing and reaping):


 They that sow [zara`:H2232/TWOT:582]  in tears shall reap in joy. {6} He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a] shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves [with him].


John 4:36-37 picks up this same theme of sowing and reaping, in which another Greek word for sowing or speiro is utilized:  And he that reapeth receiveth wages, and gathereth fruit unto life eternal: that both he that soweth [speiro:G4687] and he that reapeth may rejoice together. {37} And herein is that saying true, One soweth, [speiro:G4687] and another reapeth.


In Genesis 26:4  zera` surfaces three times in this promise that God made to Isaac (even as He did to his father Abraham, and to his son Jacob): And I will make thy seed [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a]  to multiply as the stars of heaven, and will give unto thy seed [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a]  all these countries; and in thy seed [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a]   shall all the nations of the earth be blessed;


Isaiah 54 was discussed in one of our earlier studies in this series having to do with our present day of judgment in verse after verse, and yet out of the spiritual desolation of this time, lo and behold, this same term, and thy seed or  zera` is included in verse 3 of Isaiah 54:1-3,


 Sing, O barren, thou [that] didst not bear; break forth into singing, and cry aloud, thou [that] didst not travail with child: for more [are] the children of the desolate than the children of the married wife, saith the LORD. {2} Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes; {3} For thou shalt break forth on the right hand and on the left; and thy seed [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a] shall inherit the Gentiles, and make the desolate cities to be inhabited.


Let’s take a look at one other passage that I mentioned in passing with regard to the prophecy of Balaam in Numbers 24:7, which also contains this same expression, and his seed or zera` pointing to the Lord Jesus Christ:


He shall pour the water out of his buckets, and his seed [zera`:H2233/TWOT:582a] [shall be] in many [rab:H7227/TWOT:2099a, b] waters, and his king shall be higher than Agag, and his kingdom shall be exalted.


By the way, let me also remind you that the word, [shall be] in many or rab is the identical term that we find in Isaiah 54:13 (and quoted in John 6:45 which we discussed in some detail in our previous studies) and translated and great, 


And all thy children [shall be] taught of the LORD; and great [rab:H7227/TWOT:2099a, b] [shall be] the peace of thy children.


In light of what we have covered so far in this series, we have to bear in mind what Galatians 3:16, 19, and 29 underscore with respect to Christ being the Seed or sperma, first and foremost. This Greek noun stems from the Greek verb, soweth or speiro that we just considered in John 4:36-37 a few minutes ago, and it emerges 5 times (a number that can emphasize either salvation as in this case or judgment) in these three citations:


Now to Abraham and his seed [sperma:G4690] were the promises made. He saith not, And to seeds, [sperma:G4690] as of many; but as of one, And to thy seed, [sperma:G4690]  which is Christ. ... {19} Wherefore then [serveth] the law? It was added because of transgressions, till the seed [sperma:G4690] should come to whom the promise was made; [and it was] ordained by angels in the hand of a mediator. ... {29} And if ye [be] Christ's, then are ye Abraham's seed, [sperma:G4690] and heirs according to the promise.


We need to remember that Christ was that Seed that had to die for the sins of His people at the foundation of the world, and as such the elect died with him, as we read in these next references: 


Colossians 2:12 acknowledges: Buried with him in baptism [washing away of sin], wherein also ye are risen with [him] through the faith of the operation of God, who hath raised him from the dead.


And John 12:24 affirms:  Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat [sitos:G4621] fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth [phero:G5342] much fruit. [karpos:G2590]


The fruit that resulted from the Seed (Who is the Lord Jesus) in the atonement at the foundation of the world are all the elect, who were both buried and risen with Him as we just learned from Colossians 2:12.


The two expressions in John 12:24, it bringeth forth [phero:G5342] along with fruit [karpos:G2590] bring us full circle to Mark 4:26-29, in which the compound form of these two words is rendered bringeth forth fruit or karpophoreo (G2592) in verse 28; I’ll read verses 26-28,


And he said, So is the kingdom of God, as if a man should cast seed [sporos:G4703] into the ground; {27} And should sleep, and rise night and day and the seed [sporos:G4703] should spring and grow up, he knoweth not how.  {28} For the earth bringeth forth fruit [karpophoreo:G2592] of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear. 


Some Unanswered Questions Can Now Be Resolved


In some of our earlier studies in this series I offered some questions that by God’s mercy we can now answer:


  • What are the  spiritual implications of 1 Corinthians 15:20, But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits of them that slept. [koimao:G2837] with respect to the foundation of the world, and in lieu of the following questions: 1.) Who was sleeping when Christ rose from death and annihilation at the foundation of the world?  2.) If we understand sleeping to be figurative of death, which individuals died when Christ was resurrected at the foundation of the world, when they had not even been created


The solution to who these individuals are, that both “slept” and “died” when Christ rose from the dead at the foundation of the world, is the entire Bride or Body of Christ. This would also relate to another question that was asked, namely: 


  • Do the above verses  tie into the statement regarding the formation of the Body of Christ at the foundation of the world according to Psalm 139:11-16; and please note the unique interplay of light and darkness, along with day and night? And the answer to this question is, again, “YES.” 


If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me. {12} Yea, the darkness hideth not from thee; but the night shineth as the day: the darkness and the light [are] both alike [to thee]. {13} For thou hast possessed my reins: thou hast covered me in my mother's womb. {14} I will praise thee; for I am fearfully [and] wonderfully made: marvellous [are] thy works; and [that] my soul knoweth right well. {15} My substance was not hid from thee, when I was made in secret, [and] curiously wrought in the lowest parts of the earth. {16} Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; and in thy book all [my members] were written, [which] in continuance were fashioned, when [as yet there was] none of them.


There are still two more questions that we want to try to understand, and these are:


  • Question #3 stated:  Is there a link between 1 Corinthians 15:20 and Matthew 27:51-53, which has to do with the “demonstration” in 33 AD, but spiritually must be a  manifestation of  something that occurred at the foundation of the world:  Jesus, when he had cried again with a loud voice, yielded up the ghost. {51} And, behold, the veil of the temple was rent in twain from the top to the bottom; and the earth did quake, and the rocks rent; {52} And the graves were opened; and many bodies of the saints which slept [koimao:G2837] arose, {53} And came out of the graves after his resurrection, and went into the holy city, [“heaven”] and appeared unto many.


  • Fourthly, in what way does this “two-step” passage of time in John 21 manifest itself with regard to the individual members of this great multitude becoming aware that something of a profound spiritual nature has already taken place in their souls?


We will have to wait until our next study to try to unravel these last two questions, so please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.

The “Delay” - Part 11

 April 11, 2021 


Welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship, and thank you for joining us today. Let’s begin by asking God for His blessing upon our time together... 


The purpose of today’s study is to show the importance of three related terms as they apply to the great multitude specifically (and to all of God’s elect).


  1. Patience [hupomone:G5281]
  2. Endure [hupomeno: G5278]
  3. Continue [meno:G3306] 


I would like to start by looking at the word bringeth forth fruit or karpophoreo (G2592) in Mark 4:28. I noticed that back in Part 8 I mentioned this word in connection with one of the seven other passages in which this word is included, one of which which was Luke 8:15, which states:


But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word [logos:G3056], keep [it] [katecho:G2722], and bring forth fruit [karpophoreo:G2592] with patience. [hupomone:G5281]


Inadvertently, I forget to examine the word patience or hupomone. (G5281), so I would like to begin our study, by examining that first. But before I do that, I would like to say a few things about this word, bringeth forth fruit or karpophoreo.   


Luke 8:15 is a parallel account of the parable of the Sower, along with Matthew 13:23 and Mark 4:20 that contain the word, bringeth forth fruit or karpophoreo. Additionally this expression is also used in four other references as follows in two chapters - Romans 7 and Colossians 1:5-6 and 10  


Romans 7:4-5 teaches: Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, [even] to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit [hupomone:G5281] unto God. {5} For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law, did work in our members to bring forth fruit [hupomone:G5281] unto death.


Colossians 1:5-6 and 10 likewise maintain:  For the hope which is laid up for you in heaven, whereof ye heard before in the word of the truth of the gospel; {6} Which is come unto you, as [it is] in all the world; and bringeth forth fruit [hupomone:G5281], as [it doth] also in you, since the day ye heard [of it], and knew the grace of God in truth: ... {10} That ye might walk worthy of the Lord unto all pleasing, being fruitful [hupomone:G5281] in every good work, and increasing in the knowledge of God;


It is important to bear in mind that fruit-bearing takes time both in nature as well as spiritually, and God of course is the Divine Husbandman or Farmer that is in charge of that entire process, just as we witnessed by the passage of time in Mark 4:28, when we investigated the terms, the blade, the ear, and the full corn:


For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself; first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear.


That is why this term, patience or hupomone (G5281) in Luke 8:15 is so relevant not only during the day of salvation, but even now in the day of judgment with regards to the great multitude that God saved prior to the shutting of the door of salvation. These next citations illustrate the tremendous importance that God places on this word, patience or hupomone, which stems from a term that is primarily rendered as endure or hupomeno (G5278), which in turn, is derived from the preposition hupo- (G5259), rendered predominantly as the preposition of, by, or under and the main term meno (G3306), which is a very significant word, that arises as abide, remain, dwell, and continue. So I trust that you can see that the thrust of this word embodies the qualities of patience, endurance, and continuation. Why are these attributes important? Not only are they critical in terms of fruit-bearing (which requires patience) but secondly, they relate to the idea of testing that is occurring in our present day of judgment to see if one is either gold, silver, precious stones or wood, hay, stubble; the latter of course will not be able to endure, so the fire will consume them, as we read in 1 Corinthians 3:11-17, and please note the term abide or meno (G3306) in verse 14:


For other foundation can no man lay than that is laid, which is Jesus Christ. {12} Now if any man build upon this foundation gold, silver, precious stones, wood, hay, stubble; {13} Every man's work shall be made manifest: for the day shall declare it, because it shall be revealed by fire; and the fire shall try every man's work of what sort it is. {14} If any man's work abide [meno:G3306] which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward. {15} If any man's work shall be burned, he shall suffer loss: but he himself shall be saved; yet so as by fire. {16} Know ye not that ye are the temple of God, and [that] the Spirit of God dwelleth in you? {17} If any man defile the temple of God, him shall God destroy; for the temple of God is holy, which [temple] ye are.


The former group on the other hand will, by God’s grace, be able to endure God’s refining fire to purify them each time they are subjected to one trial after another, or one doctrine after another which is really what is at stake, since it is the doctrines that emerge from the Word of God that He has been unsealing, that really make or break the individual. In essence, they stumble at the Word, according to 1 Peter 2:6-8,


Wherefore also it is contained in the scripture, Behold, I lay in Sion a chief corner stone, elect, precious: and he that believeth on him shall not be confounded. {7} Unto you therefore which believe [he is] precious: but unto them which be disobedient, the stone which the builders disallowed, the same is made the head of the corner, {8} And a stone of stumbling, and a rock of offence, [even to them] which stumble at the word, being disobedient: whereunto also they were appointed.


One of mankind’s greatest sins is that of impatience - even amongst God’s people - look at the example of Abraham and Sarah. God promised them a child of their own bowels, and they grew older and older... and still no child. So what did they do? Instead of trusting God, they took matters into their own hands, as all of us are prone to do at times, not realizing that God has a perfect timetable for each of us and for any and all of the circumstances that He allows in our lives. Then when it was literally (physically) impossible for Abraham and Sarah to have a child, God provides this miracle baby, Isaac, to show once again that He is ABSOLUTELY FAITHFUL TO KEEP EACH ONE OF HIS BLESSED PROMISES!


Patience [hupomone:G5281] 


Well, as we go through these other references that contain this term, patience or hupomone, which is linked to bring[ing] forth fruit, let’s keep Luke 8:15 in mind: 


But that on the good ground are they, which in an honest and good heart, having heard the word, keep [it], and bring forth fruit [karpophoreo:G2592] with patience. [hupomone:G5281]


Hebrews 10:36 was a major passage that we began to understand after we entered the day of judgment and once God’s elect were made aware that God had more work for His people to do, after the Great Commission ended:  


For ye have need of patience, [hupomone:G5281] that, after ye have done the will of God, ye might receive the promise.


This is why Luke 21:19 provides this admonition: In your patience [hupomone:G5281] possess ye your souls.


Likewise Revelation 14:12 makes this affirmation, and please note how God is defining the patience of the saints - by two stipulations: Here is the patience [hupomone:G5281] of the saints: here [are] they that keep the commandments of God, and the faith of Jesus.


James 1:3-4 record the process of God developing  patience in the lives of His children, which is the direct result of the trying of [one’s] faith:  Knowing [this], that the trying of your faith worketh  patience. [hupomone:G5281] {4} But let patience [hupomone:G5281] have [her] perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, wanting nothing.


In other words, if you want more patience in your life, pray for trials.


Romans 5:3-4 reiterates this same process, adding the steps of experience and hope: And not only [so], but we glory in tribulations also: knowing that tribulation worketh patience; [hupomone:G5281] {4} And patience, [hupomone:G5281] experience; and experience, hope:


Romans 15:4 addresses this issue of hope as well, underscoring the fact that it is the patience and comfort of the Scriptures that produces hope: For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning [i.e., doctrine], that we through patience [hupomone:G5281] and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.


Romans 8:24-25 also stresses that salvation is based on hope (which in this context would amount to Christ’s faith); notice too, how patience is linked to waiting, which is another Greek word that actually denotes expectation: 


For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? {25} But if we hope for that we see not, [then] do we with patience [hupomone:G5281] wait for [apekdechomai:G553] [it].


Verse 6 of 2 Peter 1:4-8 presents another progression of spiritual characteristics: Whereby are given unto us exceeding great and precious promises: that by these ye might be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. {5} And beside this, giving all diligence, add to your faith virtue; and to virtue knowledge; {6} And to knowledge temperance; and to temperance patience; [hupomone:G5281] and to patience [hupomone:G5281] godliness; {7} And to godliness brotherly kindness; and to brotherly kindness charity. {8} For if these things be in you, and abound, they make [you that ye shall] neither [be] barren nor unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.


Additionally, James 5:11 highlights the example of Job (representing Christ) and please note the inclusion of the term which endure, which is the root or parent word for patience: Behold, we count them happy which endure. [hupomeno:G5278]:  Ye have heard of the patience [hupomone:G5281] of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy.


In fact, 2 Thessalonians 3:5 renders this as patient waiting: And the Lord direct your hearts into the love of God, and into the patient waiting [hupomone:G5281] for Christ.


Last but certainly not least, is the powerful exhortation found in Hebrews 12:1-7 that all God’s saints would do well to meditate on constantly:  Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset [us], and let us run with patience [hupomone:G5281] the race that is set before us, {2} Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of [our] faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured [hupomeno:G5278] the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God. {3} For consider him that endured [hupomeno:G5278] such contradiction of sinners against himself, lest ye be wearied and faint in your minds. {4} Ye have not yet resisted unto blood, striving against sin. {5} And ye have forgotten the exhortation which speaketh unto you as unto children, My son, despise not thou the chastening of the Lord, nor faint when thou art rebuked of him: {6} For whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth. {7} If ye endure [hupomeno:G5278] chastening, God dealeth with you as with sons; for what son is he whom the father chasteneth not? {8} But if ye be without chastisement, whereof all are partakers, then are ye bastards, and not sons.


Endure [hupomeno:G5278]


Now let’s turn our attention to the root word for patience or hupomone (G5281), which is generally rendered as endure. This word has already cropped up in a couple of the verses that contain the expression, patience or hupomone (G5281)  in James 5:11, and Hebrews 12:2-3, and 7. Here are some of the other ways that this term is translated:


Matthew 24:13 (and the parallel verses in Matthew 10:22 and Mark 13:13) explain that this endur[ing] is tantamount to salvation, and is only accomplished through the will of God alone: 


But he that shall endure [hupomeno:G5278] unto the end, the same shall be saved.


In Luke 2:43 this expression is curiously translated as tarried behind: And when they had fulfilled the days, as they returned, the child Jesus tarried behind [hupomeno:G5278] in Jerusalem; and Joseph and his mother knew not [of it].


Romans 12 is a chapter filled with various admonitions, and here this term is expressed as patient in verse12:  Rejoicing in hope; patient [hupomeno:G5278] in tribulation; continuing instant in prayer;


One of the hallmarks of love (all of which are embodied in the Savior) in 1 Corinthians 13 surfaces in verse 7 as endureth: Beareth all things, believeth all things, hopeth all things, endureth [hupomeno:G5278] all things.


For this reason, James 1:12 makes this promise: Blessed [is] the man that endureth [hupomeno:G5278] temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him.


2 Timothy 2:12 includes this word as we suffer:  If we suffer, [hupomeno:G5278] we shall also reign with [him]: if we deny [him], he also will deny us:


However in 1 Peter 2:20 we find it rendered as ye take it patiently twice: For what glory [is it], if, when ye be buffeted for your faults, ye shall take it patiently? [hupomeno:G5278] but if, when ye do well, and suffer [for it], ye take it patiently, [hupomeno:G5278] this [is] acceptable with God.


Thus far we have considered the word, patience or hupomone (G5281), along with its root or parent word which is primarily rendered as endureth or hupomeno. (G5278)  As I stated at the beginning of today’s broadcast, endureth or hupomeno.  in turn, is derived from two words: the preposition hupo- (G5259), rendered predominantly of, by, or under and the main term meno (G3306), which is a very significant word, that one finds as abide, remain, dwell, and continue, as these next notices indicate: 


Abide [meno:G3306]


Earlier in today’s study as we were discussing 1 Corinthians 3 in the context of the fiery trial that is testing those who claim to be genuine Christians in order to determine if one is gold, silver, precious stones, as opposed to wood, hay, stubble;  I mentioned that the word abide emerges in verse 14:


If any man's work abide [meno:G3306] which he hath built thereupon, he shall receive a reward.  


Both those who do not abide, along with those who do are in view in 1 John 2:19 and 24,  They went out from us, but they were not of us; for if they had been of us, they would [no doubt] have continued [G3306] with us: but [they went out], that they might be made manifest that they were not all of us. ... {24} Let [G3306][G0] that therefore abide [G3306] in you, which ye have heard from the beginning. If that which ye have heard from the beginning shall remain[G3306] in you, ye also shall continue[G3306] in the Son, and in the Father.

 


In similar fashion, verse 27 of Hebrews 12:25-29 also describes our present time: See that ye refuse not him that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth, much more [shall not] we [escape], if we turn away from him that [speaketh] from heaven: {26} Whose voice then shook the earth: but now he hath promised, saying, Yet once more I shake not the earth only, but also heaven. {27} And this [word], Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain. [meno:G3306] {28} Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear: {29} For our God [is] a consuming fire. 


In John 12:23-24 we discover this same expression abideth in verse 24, along with the identical word of wheat or sitos, which in Mark 4:28, is expressed as corn; And Jesus answered them, saying, The hour is come, that the Son of man should be glorified. {24} Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat [sitos:G4621] fall into the ground and die, it abideth [meno:G3306] alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit.


This applies to Christ, first and foremost, as the Seed, and secondly to all of God’s elect, who are in the Seed as well; and for the purpose of this series, helps us to understand more and more the “delay” with regard to the bearing of fruit of the great multitude that we do not see as of yet, but that God will reveal in accordance with His good pleasure and timing as we saw so dramatically, for instance, in Isaiah 54:1-3, in that chapter that has everything to do with the day of judgment, in the context of barrenness and desolation that is the prevailing spiritual environment of our present day:


Sing, O barren, thou [that] didst not bear; break forth into singing, and cry aloud, thou [that] didst not travail with child: for more [are] the children of the desolate than the children of the married wife, saith the LORD. {2} Enlarge the place of thy tent, and let them stretch forth the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes; {3} For thou shalt break forth on the right hand and on the left; and thy seed shall inherit the Gentiles, and make the desolate cities to be inhabited.


1 Peter 1:23-25 also reveals that the Seed is the Word of God, in which this term, meno is translated as abideth and endureth: Being born again, not of corruptible seed, but of incorruptible, by the word of God, which liveth and abideth [meno:G3306] for ever. {24} For all flesh [is] as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of grass. The grass withereth, and the flower thereof falleth away: {25} But the word of the Lord endureth [meno:G3306] for ever. And this is the word which by the gospel is preached unto you.


In speaking of Mechisedec - Who is the Lord Jesus Christ - Hebrews 7:3 and 24 employ this word as abideth and continueth: Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth [meno:G3306] a priest continually. ... {24} But this [man], because he continueth [meno:G3306] ever, hath an unchangeable priesthood.


John 3:36 sets forth the distinction between the righteous and the wicked:  He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life: and he that believeth not the Son shall not see life; but the wrath of God abideth [meno:G3306] on him.


Romans 9:11 underscores this same spiritual dichotomy with respect to Jacob and Esau, expressing this term as might stand:  (For [the children] being not yet born, neither having done any good or evil, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, [meno:G3306] not of works, but of him that calleth;)


This is why John 5:38 acknowledges that one cannot truly abide without saving faith: And ye have not his word abiding [meno:G3306] in you: for whom he hath sent, him ye believe not.


John 8:31 is one of the most important declarations in all of Scripture, and note that the Master is speaking to those who “believe”:  Then said Jesus to those Jews which believed on him, If ye continue [meno:G3306] in my word, [then] are ye my disciples indeed;


Similarly, 2 Timothy 3:14 insists: But continue [meno:G3306] thou in the things which thou hast learned and hast been assured of, knowing of whom thou hast learned [them];


The question then arises: What does it mean to continue in the Word? Does that mean that I need to read my Bible every day? Do you and I need to eat physical food every day? Yes, under most circumstances you and I need to. Do we need to eat spiritual food every day? Absolutely! But reading the Bible is just the beginning...one needs to meditate and think about what one reads…as we contemplate with gratitude the very One that is the Object of our worship and our spiritual Husband for all that He has done for us , and continue to do for us...furthermore,  one needs to compare spiritual with spiritual...as well as to harmonize any conclusions we arrive at with the rest of the Bible. After all God is speaking directly to each of His elect - as it were face-to face - when we read His Truth, as verse 12 of Job 23:10-12 clearly reminds us:


But he knoweth the way that I take: [when] he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold. {11} My foot hath held his steps, his way have I kept, and not declined. {12} Neither have I gone back from the commandment of his lips; I have esteemed the words of his mouth more than my necessary [food].


This is how one has true fellowship with the Members of the Godhead, according to 1 John 1:3,


That which we have seen and heard declare we unto you, that ye also may have fellowship with us: and truly our fellowship [is] with the Father, and with his Son Jesus Christ.


John 6:27 and 56 emphasizes this as well with regard to where our efforts should be focused: Labour not for the meat which perisheth, but for that meat which endureth [meno:G3306] unto everlasting life, which the Son of man shall give unto you: for him hath God the Father sealed. ... {56} He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth [meno:G3306] in me, and I in him.


John 15 really highlights the connection with abiding and continuing in the Word with fruit-bearing in verses 4-7, 9-11, and 16; in these 7 verses this term abide, continue and remain surface 12 times testifying to their priceless spiritual value: 


Abide [meno:G3306] in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide [meno:G3306] in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide [G3306] in me. {5} I am the vine, ye [are] the branches: He that abideth [meno:G3306] in me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing. {6} If a man abide [meno:G3306] not in me, he is cast forth as a branch, and is withered; and men gather them, and cast [them] into the fire, and they are burned. {7} If ye abide [meno:G3306] in me, and my words abide [meno:G3306] in you, ye shall ask what ye will, and it shall be done unto you. ... {9} As the Father hath loved me, so have I loved you: continue ye [meno:G3306] in my love. {10} If ye keep my commandments, ye shall abide [meno:G3306] in my love; even as I have kept my Father's commandments, and abide [meno:G3306] in his love. {11} These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain [meno:G3306] in you, and [that] your joy might be full. ... {16} Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you, and ordained you, that ye should go and bring forth fruit, and [that] your fruit should remain:[meno:G3306] that whatsoever ye shall ask of the Father in my name, he may give it you.


Earlier is this series we spent some time looking at Lazarus who is featured prominently in both John 11 and 21, as he identifies with God’s elect who are alive and remain through the day of judgment.  The word, abide is curiously translated tarry in John 21:22-23, 


Jesus saith unto him, If I will that he tarry [meno:G3306] till I come, what [is that] to thee? follow thou me. {23} Then went this saying abroad among the brethren, that that disciple should not die: yet Jesus said not unto him, He shall not die; but, If I will that he tarry [meno:G3306] till I come, what [is that] to thee?


And with that reminder that is very pertinent for us, let’s conclude today’s study. Please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.