Bible Ministries International

Bible Studies

A series of verse by verse studies by Gunther von Harringa Sr

Act 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

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Nahum - Part 1


This is the first study on the book of Nahum.  We read in Nah 1:1, “The burden of Nineveh. The book of the vision of Nahum the Elkoshite.”


The Burden 


The Hebrew word “burden,” is Strong’s (massa`:H4853), and is most frequently translated as such. However, it is also rendered in the following ways: “song,” “tribute,” “exaction,” “carry away,” “to set,” and  “prophecy,” as the following two verses reveal:


In Pro 30:1 we read: “The words of Agur the son of Jakeh, [even] the prophecy [massa`:H4853]:The man spake unto Ithiel, even unto Ithiel and Ucal,” 


And Pro 31:1 further adds, “The words of king Lemuel, the prophecy [massa`:H4853] that his mother taught him.”


Of Nineveh


Nineveh was the great capital city of the Assyrian empire, and is Strong’s (niyneveh:H5210).  It is found 17 times in 16 verses, and not surprisingly, over half of these citations appear in the book of Jonah, as we learn from Jon 3:3,


“So Jonah arose, and went unto Nineveh [niyneveh:H5210], according to the word of the LORD. Now Nineveh [niyneveh:H5210], was an exceeding great city of three days' journey.” 


We are familiar with the account of Jonah’s mission to Nineveh - a wonderful example of God’s mercy and grace - during the day of salvation. In fact, the reason this is so unique is that we read of no other generation of Ninevites - either before or after - that became saved in such a glorious manner. Besides Nah 1:1, the term “Nineveh” is only found in Nahum 2:8, and 3:7 respectively: 


But Nineveh [niyneveh:H5210] is of old like a pool of water: yet they shall flee away. Stand, stand, shall they cry; but none shall look back.” 


And it shall come to pass, that all they that look upon thee shall flee from thee, and say, Nineveh [niyneveh:H5210] is laid waste: who will bemoan her? whence shall I seek comforters for thee? 


 We will note as we go along in this study that God is focusing in on the judgment of Nineveh, even as He used this secular world power to bring judgment against the ten northern tribes (Israel) in 709 BC. As a point of reference, Judah and Jerusalem were likewise given into the hands of the Babylonians 100 years later in 609 BC, which is when the Babylonian captivity began, and would end 70 years later in 539 BC, when Cyrus or Darius the Mede conquered Babylon as a “thief in the night” (as he pictures the Lord Jesus Christ coming in judgment on May 21, 2011 and commences the day of judgment on the world); this second “great tribulation” period of 70 years included the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 BC, and spiritually represents God’s judgment on all churches and denominations worldwide, and without exception on May 21, 1988.


The Book


The “book” (cepher:H5612) corresponds to the “book of Nahum,” which God caused him to write under divine inspiration. Very often this same word is used of the Bible itself; for example, in 2 Kin 22:12-13 we learn of Josiah’s precise instructions to five trustworthy men:


“And the king commanded Hilkiah the priest, and Ahikam the son of Shaphan, and Achbor the son of Michaiah, and Shaphan the scribe, and Asahiah a servant of the king's, saying, {13} Go ye, enquire of the LORD for me, and for the people, and for all Judah, concerning the words of this book that is found: for great is the wrath of the LORD that is kindled against us, because our fathers have not hearkened unto the words of this book [cepher:H5612], to do according unto all that which is written concerning us.” 


In Neh 8:1,3, 5, and 8 God very carefully underscores the supreme authority of the Bible, one’s proper attitude toward it, and God’s methodology for studying it:


“And all the people gathered themselves together as one man into the street that was before the water gate; and they spake unto Ezra the scribe to bring the book [cepher:H5612] of the law of Moses, which the LORD had commanded to Israel… {3} And he read therein before the street that was before the water gate from the morning until midday, before the men and the women, and those that could understand; and the ears of all the people [were attentive] unto the book [cepher:H5612] of the law… {5} And Ezra opened the book [cepher:H5612] in the sight of all the people; (for he was above all the people;) and when he opened it, all the people stood up:... {8} So they read in the book [cepher:H5612] in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense, and caused them to understand the reading.”  [THIS IS A UNIQUE OLD TESTAMENT COUNTERPART TO 1 COR. 2:13, AS IT REVEALS HOW TO BOTH TEACH AND STUDY THE BIBLE.]


Furthermore, in  Dan 9:2, God emphasizes the importance of the Biblical calendar of history, which is contained in Scripture, and specifically the 70-year Babylonian captivity I discussed previously. In Dan 12:4, God underscores His prerogative to “hide” information in the Bible that He did not want disclosed until the appropriate time:


“In the first year of his reign I Daniel understood by books [cepher:H5612]  the number of the years, whereof the word of the LORD came to Jeremiah the prophet, that he would accomplish seventy years in the desolations of Jerusalem.”


But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book [cepher:H5612], even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased.” 


Of The Vision


The next word that we want to turn our attention to is “of the vision” (chazown:H2377). This can refer to either a “false” revelation or one sent by God Himself, as the following passages delineate:


Jer 14:14 speaks of those who have not been given divine information: “Then the LORD said unto me, The prophets prophesy lies in my name: I sent them not, neither have I commanded them, neither spake unto them: they prophesy unto you a false vision [chazown:H2377] and divination, and a thing of nought, and the deceit of their heart.” 


On the other hand, God does accurately divulge what He desires His people to know in Hab 2:2-3, “And the LORD answered me, and said, Write the vision [chazown:H2377], and make it plain upon tables, that he may run that readeth it.{3} For the vision [chazown:H2377] is yet for an appointed time, but at the end it shall speak, and not lie: though it tarry, wait for it; because it will surely come, it will not tarry.” 


Of Nahum


God did tell His servant Nahum [nachuwm:H5151] what follows in the book of Nahum; apparently, the name, “Nahum” is derived from a root (or parent word) meaning “comfort” or “consolation” (nacham:H5162). Nahum only appears once, and only in this verse.


The Elkoshite


Once again, the term “Elkoshite,” (Elqoshiy:H512) is only used once, making it very difficult to pinpoint its exact meaning, other than the town from which Nahum hailed from.


Nah 1:2 affirms: “God [is] jealous, and the LORD revengeth; the LORD revengeth, and [is] furious; the LORD will take vengeance on his adversaries, and he reserveth [wrath] for his enemies”  


Without wasting any time, God immediately turns our attention to His Holy and Righteous character, by 5 “rapid fire” statements: 


God [Is] Jealous


The word that is translated “jealous” (qannow’:H7072) only appears one other time in Jos 24:19,


“And Joshua said unto the people, Ye cannot serve the LORD: for he is an holy God; he [is] a jealous [qannow`:H7072] God; he will not forgive your transgressions nor your sins.” 


And The LORD Revengeth


The term “revengeth” or “will take vengeance” (naqam:H5358) is used no less than three times (underscoring the “purpose of God”) in this one verse (likewise, the word “LORD” - or “JEHOVAH” is repeated 3 times) and makes the point that God is obligated to punish sin (as noted in Jos 24:19)  according to 1 Joh 3:4, “Whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law: for sin is the transgression of the law” as well as Rom 6:23a, “For the wages of sin is death…” 


The LORD revengeth (repeated the second time)


And [Is] Furious


God employs the expression, “And [is] furious,” or (ba’al:H1167) 82 times in the Old Testament, and is derived from an identically spelled root word (ba’al:H1166) It contains 22 nuances, besides “furious,” such as: “archer” “babbler,” “bird,” “captain,” “chief man,” “confederate,” “have to do,” “dreamer,” “those to whom it is due,” “those that are given to it,” “great,” “hairy,” “he that hath it,” “have,” “horseman,” “husband,” “lord,” “man,” “married,” “master,” “person,” “sworn,” and “they of.” This is why I like to refer to many of the words in the Bible, as being “pregnant” with meaning. Here are just a few examples, taken from the first three entries in Englishman’s Hebrew Concordance:


Gen 14:13 states, “And there came one that had escaped, and told Abram the Hebrew; for he dwelt in the plain of Mamre the Amorite, brother of Eshcol, and brother of Aner: and these [were] confederate [ba’al:H1167] with Abram.”


In Gen 20:3 we find both words “But God came to Abimelech in a dream by night, and said to him, Behold, thou [art but] a dead man, for the woman which thou hast taken; for she [is] a man's [ba’al:H1167] wife. [ba’al:H1166]”


Gen 37:19 points out the jealousy that Joseph’s brothers had for him: “And they said one to another, Behold, this dreamer [ba’al:H1167] cometh.”


The LORD Will Take Vengeance (repeated the third time) 


On His Adversaries


The next word we want to consider is “on his adversaries.” (tsar:H6862) It is used 105 times in the Old Testament, and in 80 of those occurrences, it is rendered as: “enemy,” “adversary,” and “trouble,” as the following passages illustrate:


A most interesting usage of this word appears in the context of Melchizedek blessing Abram in verse 20 of Gen 14:18-20, in which this word is rendered as “thine enemies”:


“And Melchizedek king of Salem brought forth bread and wine: and he was the priest of the most high God. {19} And he blessed him, and said, Blessed be Abram of the most high God, possessor of heaven and earth: {20} and blessed be the most high God, which hath delivered thine enemies [tsar:H6862] into thy hand. And he gave him tithes of all.” 


In this passage we learn that God was the One who caused Abram to be victorious over his enemies; we see this same truth repeated throughout the Bible whenever God is pleased to intercede on behalf of His people in order to ensure their victory, in accordance with His divine will.


This principle is reiterated in Deu 32:41-43, in which this  word surfaces in verse 41 as “to mine enemies,” and in verse 43 as “to his adversaries.” 


“If I whet my glittering sword, And mine hand take hold on judgment; I will render vengeance to mine enemies [tsar:H6862], And will reward them that hate me. {42} I will make mine arrows drunk with blood, And my sword shall devour flesh; And that with the blood of the slain and of the captives, From the beginning of revenges upon the enemy. {43} Rejoice, O ye nations, with his people: For he will avenge the blood of his servants, And will render vengeance to his adversaries [tsar:H6862], And will be merciful unto his land, and to his people.” 


And He Reserveth [Wrath] For His Enemies


The last two Hebrew words in Nah 1:2 - “and he reserveth” (natar:H5201) and “[wrath] for his enemies” (oyeb`:H341) are only found together in this one verse. We are familiar with the word for “enemies,” as it was found in both Psa 110, verse 1 and in verse 2. The term, “and he reserveth” occurs  9 times in the Old Testament, and is rendered mostly as a derivative of the word “keep,” as well as “grudge,” and “reserve.”  Here are just a few examples: 


Lev 19:18 commands; ‘Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge [natar:H5201] against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I [am] the LORD.”


Psa 103:9 declares,  “He will not always chide: neither will he keep [natar:H5201] [his anger] for ever.”


Jer 3:5 and 12 further add:  “Will he reserve [natar:H5201] [his anger] for ever? will he keep [it] to the end? Behold, thou hast spoken and done evil things as thou couldest. ... {12} Go and proclaim these words toward the north, and say, Return, thou backsliding Israel, saith the LORD; [and] I will not cause mine anger to fall upon you: for I [am] merciful, saith the LORD, [and] I will not keep [natar:H5201] [anger] for ever.”


Lord willing, in our next lesson, we will take a look at Nah 1:3.



Nahum - Part 2


This is the second study on the book of Nahum. Today we want to continue our study, starting off in verse 3 of chapter 1: “The LORD [is] slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit [the wicked]: the LORD hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds [are] the dust of his feet.” Before we begin our word for word investigation, let me remind you (and me) that this book - like so many in the Bible - is speaking about judgment, and in the historical context about God’s wrath against Nineveh (the capital city of the Assyrians - that heathen nation whom God used to bring judgment on the 10 northern tribes in 709 BC). However, sprinkled throughout this chapter - and curiously, only in this chapter, we find some beautiful statements related to God’s patience and mercy. And one of these appears in the first phrase of verse 3:


The LORD 


The Hebrew word that is rendered LORD (in all caps) is Jehovah:H3068, and is found 6,519 times -  6,510 times as “LORD,” 4 times as “GOD,” 4 times as “JEHOVAH,” and once as a variant (according to the blueletterbible.com). One very interesting usage of this word appears in verse 3 of Exo 6:1-4, in which God contrasts two of His many names:“God Almighty” and “Jehovah.”


“Then the LORD said unto Moses, Now shalt thou see what I will do to Pharaoh: for with a strong hand shall he let them go, and with a strong hand shall he drive them out of his land. {2} And God spake unto Moses, and said unto him, I [am] the LORD [Jehovah:H3068] {3} And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, by [the name of] God [‘el:H410] Almighty [shaddai:H7706], but by my name JEHOVAH [Jehovah:H3068] was I not known [yada`:H3045] to them. {4} And I have also established my covenant with them, to give them the land of Canaan, the land of their pilgrimage, wherein they were strangers.”


What does JEHOVAH signify, and why was He not known to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob by this name? In the Bible we find a number of very pointed references, in which God associates “Jehovah” (Jehovah:H3068) with the term “Savior” (yasha`:H3467), which is also translated in the following ways:  save,” “deliver,” “help,” “preserved,” “salvation,” “avenging,” “at all,” “ avenged,” “defend,” “rescue,” “safe,” and “victory.” The word, “Savior” (yasha`:H3467) appears 16 times in conjunction with the expression “Jehovah” (Jehovah:H3068). Here are a few notable examples:


Hos 13:4 declares, Yet I [am] the LORD [Jehovah:H3068] thy God from the land of Egypt, and thou shalt know [yada`:H3045] no god but me: for [there is] no saviour [yasha`:H3467] beside me.”


Isa 60:16 adds, “Thou shalt also suck the milk of the Gentiles, and shalt suck the breast of kings: and thou shalt know [yada`:H3045]  that I the LORD [Jehovah:H3068]  [am] thy Saviour [yasha`:H3467] and thy Redeemer, the mighty One of Jacob.”


And Isa 45:21 makes this declaration, “Tell ye, and bring [them] near; yea, let them take counsel together: who hath declared this from ancient time? [who] hath told it from that time? [have] not I the LORD [Jehovah:H3068]? and [there is] no God else beside me; a just God and a Saviour [yasha`:H3467]; [there is] none beside me.”


Similarly, Isa 43:11 repeats this refrain, I, [even] I, [am] the LORD [Jehovah:H3068]; and beside me [there is] no saviour [yasha`:H3467].” 


Although it is true that God - as Jehovah - spoke to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and others among of His elect, as we read in many verses in the Old Testament, such as Gen 32:9...


“And Jacob said, O God of my father Abraham, and God of my father Isaac, the LORD [JEHOVAH:H3068] which saidst unto me, Return unto thy country, and to thy kindred, and I will deal well with thee:” 


...what does “...by my name was I not known unto them” signify? Wonderfully, we have learned the following principle from Psa 9:16 - 


The LORD [H3068] is known [yada`:H3045] [by] the judgment [H4941] [which] he executeth:[H6213] the wicked [H7563] is snared [H5367] in the work [H6467] of his own hands.[H3709] Higgaion.[H1902] Selah.[H5542]


- in which the same word for “known” (yada`:G3045) is used as in Exo 6:3, indicating that God is “known” by the judgment which He executeth and the Israelites’ deliverance from Egypt had not yet happened, although God alluded to this in Gen 15:13 and repeated it later in Acts 7:6. This, in turn, helps us to provide an answer to those who bring up the badly misinformed statement of “no man knows.” 


Gen 15:13-14 reveal, “And he said unto Abram, Know [yada`:H3045] of a surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land [that is] not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall afflict them four hundred years; {14} And also that nation [Egypt], whom they shall serve, will I judge: and afterward shall they come out with great substance.”


Act 7:6-7 is a commentary on Gen 15:3-4: “And God spake on this wise, That his seed should sojourn in a strange land; and that they should bring them into bondage, and entreat [them] evil four hundred years. {7 } And the nation to whom they shall be in bondage will I judge, said God: and after that shall they come forth, and serve me in this place.”


Going back to Psa 9:16 for a moment...this idea of the wicked being “snared in the works of his own hands” reminds us of a couple of other verses:


We read in verse 35 of Luke 21:34-36 this instruction: “And take heed to yourselves, lest at any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and drunkenness, and cares of this life, and [so] that day come upon you unawares. {35} For as a snare shall it come on all them that dwell on the face of the whole earth. {36} Watch ye therefore, and pray always, that ye may be accounted worthy to escape all these things that shall come to pass, and to stand before the Son of man.”


Notice also verse 12 of Rev 22:11-13, which underscores the fact that the works of man will serve to condemn him, whereas the work (or faith - since faith is a work - according to Gal 2:16, and about a dozen other verses) of Christ will save the elect: “He that is unjust, let him be unjust still: and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still: and he that is righteous, let him be righteous still: and he that is holy, let him be holy still. {12} And, behold, I come quickly; and my reward [is] with me, to give every man according as his work shall be. {13} I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last.



Note the singular emphasis that God places on Israel’s deliverance in their day in Deu 4:33-40, Did [ever] people hear the voice of God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live? {34} Or hath God assayed to go [and] take him a nation from the midst of [another] nation, by temptations, by signs, and by wonders, and by war, and by a mighty hand, and by a stretched out arm, and by great terrors, according to all that the LORD your God did for you in Egypt before your eyes? {35} Unto thee it was shewed, that thou mightest know [yada`:H3045] that the LORD he [is] God; [there is] none else beside him. {36} Out of heaven he made thee to hear his voice, that he might instruct thee: and upon earth he shewed thee his great fire; and thou heardest his words out of the midst of the fire. {37} And because he loved thy fathers, therefore he chose their seed after them, and brought thee out in his sight with his mighty power out of Egypt; {38} To drive out nations from before thee greater and mightier than thou [art], to bring thee in, to give thee their land [for] an inheritance, as [it is] this day. {39} Know [yada`:H3045] therefore this day, and consider [it] in thine heart, that the LORD he [is] God in heaven above, and upon the earth beneath: [there is] none else. {40} Thou shalt keep therefore his statutes, and his commandments, which I command thee this day, that it may go well with thee, and with thy children after thee, and that thou mayest prolong [thy] days upon the earth, which the LORD thy God giveth thee, for ever.”


Ultimately, this passage points to the resurrection of the believers on the last day, when they too, according to Rom 8:21b, and 23-25, will be delivered from “...the bondage of corruption, into the glorious liberty of the children of God…{23} And not only [they], but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, [to wit], the redemption of our body. {24} For we are saved by hope: but hope that is seen is not hope: for what a man seeth, why doth he yet hope for? {25} But if we hope for that we see not, [then] do we with patience wait for [it].”



[Is] Slow To Anger


The phrase “[is] slow to anger” is comprised of two different Hebrew words - “[is] slow” (’arek:H750) and “to anger” (’aph:H639), but they also appear side by side when the compound English word, “longsuffering” is utilized (4 times) which helps to define “slow to anger;” the other 9 times the terms “slow,” (’arek:H750 ) and “to anger” (’aph:H639 ) are employed. Those of you, who have been following our previous study in Psa 110, might recall this word for “anger” or “wrath” (’aph:H639) in the phrase taken from Psa 110:5, “...in the day [yowm:H3117] of his wrath. [’aph:H639],” which we considered at length, as we sought to understand both the timing as well as the nature of Judgment day. The following verses illustrate how God uses these two words to portray His divine characteristic of being “longsuffering” or “slow to anger” during the day of salvation:


Num 14:18 testifies, “The LORD [is] longsuffering [’arek:H750/’aph:H639] and of great mercy, forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means clearing [the guilty], visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth [generation].”


Psa 145:8 reveals, “The LORD [is] gracious, and full of compassion; slow [’arek:H750] to anger [’aph:H639], and of great mercy.”


Joe 2:13 further adds,  “And rend your heart, and not your garments, and turn unto the LORD your God: for he [is] gracious and merciful, slow [’arek:H750] to anger [’aph:H639], and of great kindness, and repenteth him of the evil.”


Lastly, Jon 4:2 declares, “And he prayed unto the LORD, and said, I pray thee, O LORD, [was] not this my saying, when I was yet in my country? Therefore I fled before unto Tarshish: for I knew that thou [art] a gracious God, and merciful, slow [’arek:H750] to anger [’aph:H639], and of great kindness, and repentest thee of the evil.”  


Great In Power


The English phrase “great in power” is actually comprised of two Hebrew words: “great” (gadowl:H1419) and “in power” (koach:H3581); these two terms appear together in 15 passages - five of which are related to God’s great power in delivering His people out of Egypt - a magnificent portrayal of all God’s elect whom He saved from the foundation of the world, as we see from 2 Kin 17:36, where these two words are rendered as “with great” and “power”:


“But the LORD, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt with great [gadowl:H1419] power [koach:H3581] and a stretched out arm, him shall ye fear, and him shall ye worship, and to him shall ye do sacrifice.”


Three out of the 15 citations deal with Samson’s strength - and he is a great type or representation of the Lord Jesus Christ - Who in 1 Cor 1:24 is described asthe power [dunamis:G1411] of God [theos:G2316].” In Jud 16:5 these two terms are translated as “wherein his great” and “strength”:


“And the lords of the Philistines came up unto her [Delilah], and said unto her, Entice him, and see wherein his great [gadowl:H1419]  strength [koach:H3581]   [lieth], and by what [means] we may prevail against him, that we may bind him to afflict him: and we will give thee every one of us eleven hundred [pieces] of silver.”


In two occurrences in the book of Jeremiah, these words are used in conjunction with God’s energy in Creation, as Jer 32:17 so magnificently extols:


“Ah Lord GOD! behold, thou hast made the heaven and the earth by thy great  [gadowl:H1419]  power [koach:H3581] and stretched out arm, [and] there is nothing too hard for thee:


One other verse is found in Psa 147:5, in which the first word for “great” and the term for “power” are utilized:  Great [gadowl:H1419]  [is] our Lord, and of great power [koach:H3581]: his understanding [is] infinite.” 


Besides, Nah 1:3 which we are presently considering, out of the remaining five references, three references relate to Ephraim and Manasseh (Jos 17:17), and two in Daniel (10:8 and 11:25).


We will have to stop here today, and resume our examination of Nahum 1 next LORD’S day, as God permits.

Nahum - Part 3


This is the third study in the book of Nahum... Today we want to continue our examination, starting off with the last phrase in verses 3-4 of chapter 1: “The LORD [is] slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit [the wicked]: the LORD hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds [are] the dust of his feet. {4} He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth.”


And Will Not At All (naqah:H5352)  Acquit (naqah:H5352) [The Wicked]


The next phrase we want to investigate in Nah 1:3 is rather interesting, in that it consists of only two words, that are repeated: “...and will not at all [naqah:H5352] acquit [naqah:H5352] [the wicked]...” which is very much related to Gen 2:17, in which this same kind of duplication occurs:


“But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt not eat of it: for in the day that thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely [muwth:H4191] die [muwth:H4191].” 


This particular Hebrew word is found 44 times in the Old Testament, and is rendered in the following ways:  “unpunished,”  “guiltless,” “innocent,” “clear,” “cleanse,” “free,” “by no means,” “acquit,” “altogether,” “cut off,” “at all,” “blameless,” “desolate,” “quit,” “utterly,” and “wholly.” Let’s consider some of these citations:


Exo 34:7 is identical to Nah 1:3 in the repetition of  naqah (H5352) twice:, “Keeping mercy for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, and that will by no means [naqah:H5352] clear [naqah:H5352] [the guilty]; visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children, and upon the children's children, unto the third and to the fourth [generation].”


Num 14:18 likewise does the same: “The LORD [is] longsuffering, and of great mercy, forgiving iniquity and transgression, and by no means [naqah:H5352] clearing [naqah:H5352] [the guilty], visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth [generation].”


Job 10:14 also declares, “If I sin, then thou markest me, and thou wilt not acquit [naqah:H5352] me from mine iniquity.”


Jer 25:29 - the Old Testament counterpart of 1 Pet 4:17 -  further acknowledges, “For, lo, I begin to bring evil on the city which is called by my name, and should ye be utterly unpunished? [naqah:H5352]  Ye shall not be unpunished [naqah:H5352]: for I will call for a sword upon all the inhabitants of the earth, saith the LORD of hosts.”


Lastly, in Jer 49:12, this same term is repeated three times in succession: “For thus saith the LORD; Behold, they whose judgment [was] not to drink of the cup have assuredly drunken; and [art] thou he [that] shall altogether [naqah:H5352] go unpunished? [naqah:H5352]  thou shalt not go unpunished [naqah:H5352], but thou shalt surely drink [of it].”


The LORD Hath His Way


Once again, God uses His Name, “LORD” (in caps) or “JEHOVAH” (Jehovah:H3068) in this verse. The term, “hath his way” (derek:H1870) is used over 700 times in the Old Testament, and in the vast majority of cases, as “way.” The subsequent passages show us that spiritually, “the way” symbolizes the Lord Jesus Christ, as John 14:6 so beautifully exclaims,


“Jesus saith unto him, I am the way, the truth, and the life: no man cometh unto the Father, but by me.” 


In Exo 33:12-14, we find Moses beseeching God concerning “the way”: “And Moses said unto the LORD, See, thou sayest unto me, Bring up this people: and thou hast not let me know whom thou wilt send with me. Yet thou hast said, I know thee by name, and thou hast also found grace in my sight. {13} Now therefore, I pray thee, if I have found grace in thy sight, shew me now thy way [derek:H1870], that I may know thee, that I may find grace in thy sight: and consider that this nation [is] thy people. {14} And he said, My presence shall go [with thee], and I will give thee rest.”


Similarly, in verse 20 of Gen 28:19-22, Jacob asks God to “keep” him “in this way”: “And he called the name of that place Bethel [or “house of God”]: but the name of that city [was called] Luz at the first. {20} And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way [derek:H1870] that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, {21} So that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the LORD be my God: {22} And this stone, which I have set [for] a pillar, shall be God's house: and of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.”


In Exo 23:20 God tells Moses how he plans to keep His elect “in the way”: “Behold, I send an Angel [Christ] before thee, to keep thee in the way [derek:H1870], and to bring thee into the place which I have prepared.”


And Exo 13:21 further specifies that He will use the “pillar of a cloud” by day and “a pillar of fire” by night to “lead [His elect] in the way” - both of which point to the Word of God, the Bible:  “And the LORD went before them by day in a pillar of a cloud, to lead them the way [derek:H1870]; and by night in a pillar of fire, to give them light; to go by day and night:”


In The Whirlwind


The next word we want to consider is “in the whirlwind,” (cuwphah:H5492) which God employs in 16 different passages, most commonly as “whirlwind,” but also as “storm,” “Red sea,” and “tempest.” Here are a few examples:


Num 21:14 is the only place where it is rendered “in the Red sea”:  “Wherefore it is said in the book of the wars of the LORD, What he did in the Red sea [cuwphah:H5492], and in the brooks of Arnon,”


Verse 18 of Job 21:17-18 translates it as “that the storm”: “How oft is the candle of the wicked put out! and [how oft] cometh their destruction upon them! [God] distributeth sorrows in his anger. {18} They are as stubble before the wind, and as chaff that the storm [cuwphah:H5492] carrieth away.”


Job 27:19-20 is part of a lengthy parable and speaks about the fate of the non-elect, where this word appears as “a tempest”: “The rich man shall lie down, but he shall not be gathered: he openeth his eyes, and he [is] not.{20} Terrors take hold on him as waters, a tempest [cuwphah:H5492] stealeth him away in the night.”


In verse 15 of Psa 83:15-18 (the entire psalm speaks exclusively of the fate of the unsaved) this same word is rendered “with thy storm”: “So persecute them with thy tempest, and make them afraid with thy storm [cuwphah:H5492].”


In verse 27 of Pro 1:27-31, it is translated, “as a whirlwind”: “When your fear cometh as desolation, and your destruction cometh as a whirlwind [cuwphah:H5492]; when distress and anguish cometh upon you. {28} Then shall they call upon me, but I will not answer; they shall seek me early, but they shall not find me: {29} For that they hated knowledge, and did not choose the fear of the LORD: {30} They would none of my counsel: they despised all my reproof. {31} Therefore shall they eat of the fruit of their own way, and be filled with their own devices.”


Pro 10 is a chapter where God contrasts the righteous with the wicked, and in verse 25, we find our word translated “as the whirlwind”:  “The fear of the wicked, it shall come upon him: but the desire of the righteous shall be granted. {25} As the whirlwind [cuwphah:H5492] passeth, so [is] the wicked no [more]: but the righteous [is] an everlasting foundation.”


And In The Storm


The next word, “and in the storm” (s@`arah:H8183) is only found in one other citation, Job 9:17, and appears as, “me with a tempest,” and spiritually points to the Lord Jesus under God’s wrath - which is what all the unsaved will experience when they die and are annihilated: 


“For he breaketh me with a tempest [s@`arah:H8183], and multiplieth my wounds [petsa`:H6482] without cause.”


Additionally, the word that God chose for “my wounds” is petsa` (H6482), which is only found 7 other times, and appears, for instance, in verse 6 of Isa 1:5-6, which is description of sin - primarily referring to the iniquity of Israel - who typifies the institutional churches and denominations of our day, that God abandoned on May 21, 1988. Parabolically their sin is characterized by a “loathsome disease,” such as leprosy, which is why God utilizes this term to amplify our understanding that the “wounds” that Christ was subjected to were the sins of all the elect, for whom He made atonement for, prior to Creation, as the “...Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Rev 13:8)


Isa 1:5-6 acknowledges, “Why should ye be stricken any more? ye will revolt more and more: the whole head [ro’sh:H7218] is sick, and the whole heart faint. {6} From the sole [kaph:H3709] of the foot [regel:H7272] even unto the head [there is] [ro’sh:H7218] no soundness in it; [but] wounds [petsa`:H6482], and bruises, and putrifying sores: they have not been closed, neither bound up, neither mollified with ointment.”


Verse 35 of Deu 28 is one of many curses that God pronounced against Israel, if they did not heed His commandments; by contrast, the first part of this chapter lists all the manifold blessings that God would bestow upon them, if they did obey: “The LORD shall smite thee in the knees, and in the legs, with a sore botch that cannot be healed, from the sole of thy foot [regel:H7272] unto the top of thy head. [different word, but same idea - qodqod:H6936]”


And The Clouds Are The Dust Of His Feet


The last phrase that we want to turn our attention to in verse 3 of Nah 1 is comprised of three Hebrew words: “...and the clouds [`ana:H6051] [are] the dust [’abaq:H80] of his feet” [regel:H7272], which is a most interesting statement indeed, having to do with our present time. Lord willing, I will begin to explain what is behind this parabolic utterance in the time we have left, but I don’t think I’ll be able to finish it today. Let me start by reading Nah 1:2-8, as these verses describe some of God’s holy attributes, and we have to remember that they are set in the context of the “day of judgment”:


God [’el:H310] [is] jealous, and the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] revengeth; the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] revengeth, and [is] furious; the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] will take vengeance on his adversaries, and he reserveth [wrath] for his enemies. {3} The LORD [Yehovah:H3068] [is] slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit [the wicked]: the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds [are] the dust of his feet. {4} He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth. {5} The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence, yea, the world, and all that dwell therein. {6} Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him. {7} The LORD [Yehovah:H3068] [is] good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him. {8} But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies.”


Of His Feet


Let’s first consider the term, “of his feet” (regel:H7272), as this is referring to God’s “feet,” and we have learned that the “feet” along with the “hand” symbolize the will of whoever is in view, which in this case, is God Himself - and particularly, (Yehovah:H3068) since LORD is in view 6 times in this passage, whereas God (’el:H310) appears only once (in verse 1). One of the very first references in the Bible where “foot” is used is in Gen 8:6, having to do with the dove’s “foot” - and the dove in this passage represents the third member of the Triune God - the Holy Spirit:


“But the dove found no rest for the sole of her foot [regel:H7272], and she returned unto him into the ark, for the waters [were] on the face of the whole earth: then he put forth his hand, and took her, and pulled her in unto him into the ark.”


Exo 24:10 provides the awesome spectacle that Moses, Aaron, Nadab, Abihu and the 70 elders beheld: “And they saw the God of Israel: and [there was] under his feet [regel:H7272] as it were a paved work of a sapphire stone, and as it were the body of heaven in [his] clearness.


Verse 3 of Deu 33:1-3 renders this term as “at thy feet”: “And this [is] the blessing, wherewith Moses the man of God blessed the children of Israel before his death. {2} And he said, The LORD came from Sinai, and rose up from Seir unto them; he shined forth from mount Paran, and he came with ten thousands of saints: from his right hand [went] a fiery law for them. {3} Yea, he loved the people; all his saints [are] in thy hand: and they sat down at thy feet [regel:H7272]; [every one] shall receive of thy words.”


The “feet” also are used frequently in the Bible to walk from one place to another, as these next citations illustrate:


In Gen 29:1, we discover that this term is translated “on his journey”: “Then Jacob went on his journey [regel:H7272], and came into the land of the people of the east.”


Likewise, with Jacob still in view,  Gen 30:30 states:  “For [it was] little which thou hadst before I [came], and it is [now] increased unto a multitude; and the LORD hath blessed thee since my coming:[regel:H7272] and now when shall I provide for mine own house also?”


Unfortunately, I will have to stop here, but LORD willing, we will continue this study next Sunday.



Nahum - Part 4

October 31, 2015



This is the fourth study in the book of Nahum. I’ll read verses 3-8:  


“The LORD [is] slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit [the wicked]: the LORD hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds [are] the dust of his feet. {4} He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth. {5} The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence, yea, the world, and all that dwell therein. {6} Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him. {7} The LORD [is] good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him. {8} But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies.”


In our previous study we began looking at the phrase, “and the clouds are the dust of his feet,” which is comprised of three words: “...and the clouds [`ana:H6051] [are] the dust [’abaq:H80] of his feet” [regel:H7272], which as I mentioned previously is a very interesting expression, and these three terms are only found in this verse. In our last study we focused on the word, “feet,” and since this is referring to God’s “feet,” and spiritually the “foot” or “feet” represent the will of the one in view - in this case God Himself - so then how are we to understand the phrase “...and the clouds” “[are] the dust” of His feet [i.e., “will”]?


And The Clouds


The Hebrew word rendered as “and the clouds” (`anan:H6051) is translated 81 times as “cloud,” and 6 times as “cloudy,” as the following references show:


The earliest citation in the Bible regarding “clouds” is in Gen 9:12-17, in which this term appears in verses 13-14, and 16, as God promises to never destroy the earth by a flood again - verified by the appearance of a rainbow in the cloud, underscoring God’s unswerving faithfulness to His commitments, as outlined in the Bible:


“And God said, This [is] the token of the covenant which I make between me and you and every living creature that [is] with you, for perpetual generations: {13} I do set my bow [qesheth:H7198] in the cloud [`ana:H6051], and it shall be for a token of a covenant between me and the earth. {14} And it shall come to pass, when I bring a cloud [`anan:H6051] over the earth, that the bow [qesheth:H7198] shall be seen in the cloud [`anan:H6051]: {15} And I will remember my covenant, which [is] between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh. {16} And the bow [qesheth:H7198] shall be in the cloud [`anan:H6051]; and I will look upon it, that I may remember the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that [is] upon the earth. {17} And God said unto Noah, This [is] the token of the covenant, which I have established between me and all flesh that [is] upon the earth.”


This is also seen in Eze 1:28, in which it is rendered as “in the cloud” and this entire chapter is dealing with “the glory of the LORD;” additionally, please note the identical word for “[rain] bow” which is used three times in Gen 9:13, 14 and 16, and appears here as well: “As the appearance of the bow [qesheth:H7198] that is in the cloud [`anan:H6051] in the day of rain, so [was] the appearance of the brightness round about. This [was] the appearance of the likeness of the glory of the LORD. And when I saw [it], I fell upon my face, and I heard a voice of one that spake.”


In these passages we see the “cloud” associated with God Himself, and His divine attributes of mercy and glory, and equally important, as it symbolizes the Word of God:


We also read in Exo 16:10, “And it came to pass, as Aaron spake unto the whole congregation of the children of Israel, that they looked toward the wilderness, and, behold, the glory of the LORD appeared in the cloud.” [`anan:H6051]


One of the most notable examples of this word is found in the last verses of  Exo 40 (34-38), at the completion of the Tabernacle. Not only does the “cloud” represent the presence of God 24/7, but it also served to indicate the will of God concerning what God would have His people to do - with regards to “resting” in one of their 42 encampments, or to resume “travelling” to the next site:


Then a cloud [`anan:H6051] covered the tent of the congregation, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle. {35} And Moses was not able to enter into the tent of the congregation, because the cloud [`anan:H6051] abode thereon, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle. {36} And when the cloud [`anan:H6051] was taken up from over the tabernacle, the children of Israel went onward in all their journeys: {37} But if the cloud [`anan:H6051] were not taken up, then they journeyed not till the day that it was taken up. {38} For the cloud [`anan:H6051] of the LORD [was] upon the tabernacle by day, and fire was on it by night, in the sight of all the house of Israel, throughout all their journeys.”


Incidentally, the root word for “cloud” (`anan:H6051) is spelled identically (`anan:H6049), but its significance in diametrically opposed in 10 of the 11 verses where it appears. We first find it in a citation we looked at a little while ago in Gen 9:14, where it is translated as “...when I bring [`anan:H6049]...”:


“And it shall come to pass, when I bring [`anan:H6049] a cloud [`anan:H6051] over the earth, that the bow [qesheth:H7198] shall be seen in the cloud [`anan:H6051]:”


More commonly, this term is rendered these ways: observer of times(5x), soothsayer(2x), sorceress (1x), and enchanter(1x), as these next passages illustrate, indicating where their trust resided:


Deu 18:10 and 14 warn: “There shall not be found among you [any one] that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, [or] that useth divination, [or] an observer of times, [`anan:H6049] or an enchanter, or a witch, ... {14} For these nations, which thou shalt possess, hearkened unto observers of times, [`anan:H6049] and unto diviners: but as for thee, the LORD thy God hath not suffered [“allowed”] thee so [to do].”


With regards to Manasseh king of Judah, 2 Chr 33:6 declares: “And he caused his children to pass through the fire in the valley of the son of Hinnom: also he observed times, [`anan:H6049] and used enchantments, and used witchcraft, and dealt with a familiar spirit, and with wizards: he wrought much evil in the sight of the LORD, to provoke him to anger.”


[Are] The Dust [’abaq:H80] 


So we recognize that if the “clouds” represent the Word of God - whether for mercy or for judgment - and God’s “feet” His will, how does the “dust” fit in spiritually, as we read that the “clouds” are synonymous with “dust”: “...the clouds [are] the dust of his feet.”? The term, “[are] the dust” in Nah 1:3 is H80, which only occurs in five other references, and like Nah 1:3, they all refer to judgment, as we shall presently see:


Exo 9:9 chronicles the plague of “boils” that God brought upon the Egyptians - man and animal alike; this word is rendered, “And it shall become small dust”:  And it shall become small dust [’abaq:H80] in all the land of Egypt, and shall be a boil breaking forth [with] blains upon man, and upon beast, throughout all the land of Egypt.”


Deu 28:24 outlines the blessings, and then the more numerous curses that God prescribed for disobedience to His holy commands; here this term is translated as “powder”: “The LORD shall make the rain of thy land powder [’abaq:H80] and dust: from heaven shall it come down upon thee, until thou be destroyed.”


Isa 5:24 is a historical parable of the vineyard - typifying national Israel (and by extension, the churches and denominations that God abandoned on May 21, 1988, even as He finalized His divorce from Israel when Christ hung on the Cross in 33 AD); this word is rendered “as dust”: “Therefore as the fire devoureth the stubble, and the flame consumeth the chaff, [so] their root shall be as rottenness, and their blossom shall go up as dust: [’abaq:H80] because they have cast away the law of the LORD of hosts, and despised the word of the Holy One of Israel.”


Isa 29:5 is an indictment against Jerusalem, that again typifies the New Testament churches and denominations that came under God’s wrath, according to His divine decree, in which H80 is translated “dust”: “Moreover the multitude of thy strangers shall be like small dust, [’abaq:H80] and the multitude of the terrible ones [shall be] as chaff that passeth away: yea, it shall be at an instant suddenly.”


Eze 26:10 is another pronouncement of judgment - against Tyre this time - and once again is a spiritual portrait of the churches and denominations, and rendered as “their dust”: “By reason of the abundance of his horses their dust [’abaq:H80] shall cover thee: thy walls shall shake at the noise of the horsemen, and of the wheels, and of the chariots, when he shall enter into thy gates, as men enter into a city wherein is made a breach.”


Thus, each of these passages have a common thread of retribution running through them, pointing to the fact that in this setting, God’s Word (“the clouds”) is judgment (“[are] the dust”) according to His will (“his feet”).


I would also like to point out that the root word for “dust,” is (’abaq:H79), and spelled identically to H80. It is only found in two citations having to do with Jacob “wrestling” God (a picture of the elect  spiritually “striving” to enter into the kingdom of God), and found in  Gen 32:24-25; in the historical context this would have taken place on the ground, and, most likely, they would have gotten “dusty” in the process:


“And Jacob was left alone; and there wrestled [’abaq:H79] a man with him until the breaking of the day. {25} And when he saw that he prevailed not against him, he touched the hollow of his thigh; and the hollow of Jacob's thigh was out of joint, as he wrestled [’abaq:H79] with him.”


Moreover, we know from other words in the Bible that are rendered as “dust,” that it implies death, as the most common term for “dust” is (`aphar:H6083), found, for instance, in Gen 3:19,

“In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread, till thou return unto the ground; for out of it wast thou taken: for dust [`aphar:H6083] thou [art], and unto dust [`aphar:H6083]  shalt thou return.”


He Rebuketh [ga’ar:H1605] The Sea [yam:H3220] And Maketh It Dry [charab:H2717]


Let’s move on to verse 4, and we will consider the first phrase in this verse, which is comprised of three Hebrew words, “He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry…”: He rebuketh [ga’ar:H1605]  the sea [yam:H3220], and maketh it dry [charab:H2717], and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth.”


These three words are only found together in verse 9 of Psa 106, but I’ll read the context from verses 7-15, as this majestic chapter extols God’s mercy and faithfulness to His corporate people, in spite of their ongoing sinfulness; notice how God delivered them time and again, and even destroyed their enemies, but also “sent leaness into their soul” as a chastisement


“Our fathers understood not thy wonders in Egypt; they remembered not the multitude of thy mercies; but provoked [him] at the sea, [even] at the Red sea. {8} Nevertheless he saved them for his name's sake, that he might make his mighty power to be known. {9} He rebuked [ga’ar:H1605]  the Red sea [yam:H3220]  also, and it was dried up [charab:H2717]: so he led them through the depths, as through the wilderness. {10} And he saved them from the hand of him that hated [them], and redeemed them from the hand of the enemy. {11} And the waters covered their enemies: there was not one of them left. {12} Then believed they his words; they sang his praise. {13} They soon forgat his works; they waited not for his counsel: {14} But lusted exceedingly in the wilderness, and tempted God in the desert. {15} And he gave them their request; but sent leanness into their soul.”


As with Noah’s Flood, the water was the means for salvation (of the elect - in the Ark and typified by the nation as a whole) as well as for destruction (of the non-elect - outside the Ark and represented by Pharaoh and his army), as we read in 1 Pet 3:20 and 2 Pet 2:5,


“Which sometime were disobedient, when once the longsuffering of God waited in the days of Noah, while the ark was a preparing, wherein few, that is, eight souls were saved by water…{2 Pet 2:5} And spared not the old world, but saved Noah the eighth [person], a preacher of righteousness, bringing in the flood upon the world of the ungodly;”


Well, on that hopeful and ominous note, we will have to stop here, and Lord willing, pick up our study in Nahum next Sunday.

Nahum - Part 5

November 5, 2016


This is the fifth study in the book of Nahum. I’ll read verses 4-8:  


“ He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth. {5} The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence, yea, the world, and all that dwell therein. {6} Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him. {7} The LORD [is] good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him. {8} But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies.”


And Maketh It Dry


In our last lesson we left off at the phrase in Nah 1:4, “...and maketh it dry [charab:H2717], and drieth up [yabesh:H3001] all the rivers [nahar:H5104]...” which is comprised of three words, and these three terms also appear together in the following four passages; each of these chapters, like Nah 1, are set in the context of judgment:


Verse 11 of Job 14:10-14 contrasts the fate of the non-elect to death and annihilation, with the hope of the resurrection or transformation of the elect at the “appointed time”: “But man dieth, and wasteth away: yea, man giveth up the ghost, and where [is] he? {11} [As] the waters fail from the sea, and the flood [nahar:H5104] decayeth [charab:H2717] and drieth up [yabesh:H3001]: {12} So man lieth down, and riseth not: till the heavens [be] no more, they shall not awake, nor be raised out of their sleep. {13} O that thou wouldest hide me in the grave, that thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be past, that thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and remember me! {14} If a man die, shall he live [again]? all the days of my appointed time will I wait, till my change come.”


Verse 5 of Isa 19:4-8 can be understood in light of Rev 11:8, in which God’s usage of  the New Testament churches and denominations worldwide and without exception came under the wrath of God on May 21, 1988 and are symbolized by the epithets “Sodom” and “Egypt” - chracterized by  “gross sin” and “slavery to sin” respectively: (“And their dead bodies [shall lie] in the street of the great city, which spiritually is called Sodom and Egypt, where also our Lord was crucified.”): “And the Egyptians will I give over into the hand of a cruel lord [Satan]; and a fierce king [Satan] shall rule over them, saith the Lord, the LORD of hosts. {5} And the waters shall fail from the sea, and the river [nahar:H5104] shall be wasted [charab:H2717] and dried up [yabesh:H3001]. {6} And they shall turn the rivers far away; [and] the brooks of defence shall be emptied and dried up [charab:H2717]: the reeds and flags shall wither. {7} The paper reeds by the brooks, by the mouth of the brooks, and every thing sown by the brooks, shall wither [yabesh:H3001], be driven away, and be no [more]. {8} The fishers also shall mourn, and all they that cast angle into the brooks shall lament, and they that spread nets upon the waters shall languish.”


Please note how the terms “and dried up” (charab:H2717) and “shall wither” (yabesh:H3001) are repeated individually in verses 6 and 7 as well; the “fishing” context and repetition of the words, “waters,” (2x) “sea,” (1x) “brooks,” (4x) “river(s),” (2x), along with the phrases, “fishers also shall mourn,” “they that shall cast angle into the brooks shall lament,” and “they that spread nets upon the waters shall languish” sum up the cessation of “fishing for men” by means of the divine organism of the New Testament churches; nonetheless the Great Commission would still continue outside of that holy institution, by ministries and individuals who were no longer connected to the churches and denominations until the Great Commission ended on May 21, 2011, according to Mat 24:14,


“And this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come.”


The “drying up” of “rivers” and “pools” and “herbs” (i.e. “green grass”) - symbolizing the end of salvation within the churches and denominations (since the Holy Spirit abandoned them on May 21, 1988), and the destruction of “mountains” and “hills” (typifying “kingdoms” - in this context, the kingdom of Satan which has overrun the churches and denominations) verse 15 of  Isa 42:13-16 reveals: “The LORD shall go forth as a mighty man, he shall stir up jealousy like a man of war: he shall cry, yea, roar; he shall prevail against his enemies. {14} I have long time holden my peace; I have been still, [and] refrained myself: [now] will I cry like a travailing woman; I will destroy and devour at once. {15} I will make waste [charab:H2717] mountains and hills, and dry up [yabesh:H3001] all their herbs; and I will make the rivers [nahar:H5104] islands, and I will dry up [yabesh:H3001] the pools. {16} And I will bring the blind by a way [that] they knew not; I will lead them in paths [that] they have not known: I will make darkness light before them, and crooked things straight. These things will I do unto them, and not forsake them.”


The last reference that contains the three terms we have been considering in Nah 1:4, is verse 27 of Isa 44:26-28, “That confirmeth the word of his servant, and performeth the counsel of his messengers; that saith to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be inhabited; and to the cities of Judah, Ye shall be built, and I will raise up the decayed places thereof: {27} That saith to the deep, Be dry [charab:H2717], and I will dry up [yabesh:H3001] thy rivers [nahar:H5104]: {28} That saith of Cyrus, [symbolizing the Lord Jesus Christ] [He is] my shepherd, and shall perform all my pleasure: even saying to Jerusalem, Thou shalt be built; and to the temple, Thy foundation shall be laid.”


In spite of the “dry” “deep” (or “sea”) and “rivers” along with the “decayed places” - highlighting the removal of the Gospel from the end-time institutional churches and denominations), the Lord Jesus Christ (characterized by Cyrus - “my shepherd”) will continue to build His eternal church - utilizing the language of building “Jerusalem” (i.e., “Jerusalem above”) and “the foundation [of the Temple] shall be laid” until the end of the Great Commission on May 21, 2011.


Bashan [Bashan:H1316] Languisheth [’amal:H535], And Carmel [Karmel:H3760], And The Flower [perach:H6525] Of Lebanon [Lebanown:H3844] Languisheth [’amal:H535] 


The last phrase in verse four that we want to investigate is: “...Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth.” which is made up of five words. Let’s first take a look at the word “languisheth” (’amal:H535) which appears twice in this phrase, and then we can consider what Bashan, Carmel, and Lebanon have in common spiritually. The term, “languisheth” (’amal:H535), is found in 15 citations (besides Nah 1:4), and is translated once as “weak” and once as “feeble;” the other 14 times it is rendered as “languish” or “languisheth.” Here are a few illustrations, and again we will see more of God’s hand of judgment against both the churches and denominations in the first instance, and then, secondly, against the world at large, as God takes away salvation from each on May 21, 1988 and May 21, 2011 respectively, according to 1 Pet 4:17-18, and its Old Testament counterpart, Jer 25:29,


1 Pet 4:17-18 declares: “For the time [is come] that judgment must begin at the house of God [the end-time institutional churches and denominations]: and if [it] first [begin] at us, what shall the end [be] of them that obey not the gospel of God? {18} And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?”


Likewise Jer 25:29 similarly affirms: “For, lo, I begin to bring evil on the city which is called by my name [“Jerusalem” - referring to the end-time institutional churches and denominations], and should ye [i.e., the world at large] be utterly unpunished? Ye shall not be unpunished: for I will call for a sword upon all the inhabitants of the earth, saith the LORD of hosts.”


Earlier we looked at Isa 19:4-8, and in verse 8, we find the term, “shall languish” in the context of God’s judgment on the end-time institutional churches and denominations: 


“The fishers also shall mourn, and all they that cast angle into the brooks shall lament, and they that spread nets upon the waters shall languish.” [’amal:H535]


God’s judgment that began on His own “house” first is also in view in the subsequent references as well:


In verse 2 of Jer 14:1-6, this word is rendered “thereof languish,” in which a spiritual famine is is view hence the scarcity of “water/rain” and “grass,” symbolizing spiritual life and nourishment: “The word of the LORD that came to Jeremiah concerning the dearth. {2} Judah mourneth, and the gates thereof languish [’amal:H535]; they are black unto the ground; and the cry of Jerusalem is gone up. {3} And their nobles have sent their little ones to the waters: they came to the pits, [and] found no water; they returned with their vessels empty; they were ashamed and confounded, and covered their heads. {4} Because the ground is chapt, for there was no rain in the earth, the plowmen were ashamed, they covered their heads. {5} Yea, the hind also calved in the field, and forsook [it], because there was no grass. {6} And the wild asses did stand in the high places, they snuffed up the wind like dragons; their eyes did fail, because [there was] no grass.” 


In verse 8 of Lam 2:1-11 we witness this same dreadful scenario, as God keeps hammering home His divine judgment in no uncertain terms; this term is translated as “they languished”: “How hath the Lord covered the daughter of Zion with a cloud in his anger, [and] cast down from heaven unto the earth the beauty of Israel, and remembered not his footstool in the day of his anger! {2} The Lord hath swallowed up all the habitations of Jacob, and hath not pitied: he hath thrown down in his wrath the strong holds of the daughter of Judah; he hath brought [them] down to the ground: he hath polluted the kingdom and the princes thereof. {3} He hath cut off in [his] fierce anger all the horn of Israel: he hath drawn back his right hand from before the enemy, and he burned against Jacob like a flaming fire, [which] devoureth round about. {4} He hath bent his bow like an enemy: he stood with his right hand as an adversary, and slew all [that were] pleasant to the eye in the tabernacle of the daughter of Zion: he poured out his fury like fire. {5} The Lord was as an enemy: he hath swallowed up Israel, he hath swallowed up all her palaces: he hath destroyed his strong holds, and hath increased in the daughter of Judah mourning and lamentation. {6} And he hath violently taken away his tabernacle, as [if it were of] a garden: he hath destroyed his places of the assembly: the LORD hath caused the solemn feasts and sabbaths to be forgotten in Zion, and hath despised in the indignation of his anger the king and the priest. {7} The Lord hath cast off his altar, he hath abhorred his sanctuary, he hath given up into the hand of the enemy the walls of her palaces; they have made a noise in the house of the LORD, as in the day of a solemn feast. {8} The LORD hath purposed to destroy the wall of the daughter of Zion: he hath stretched out a line, he hath not withdrawn his hand from destroying: therefore he made the rampart and the wall to lament; they languished [’amal:H535] together. {9} Her gates are sunk into the ground; he hath destroyed and broken her bars: her king and her princes [are] among the Gentiles: the law [is] no [more]; her prophets also find no vision from the LORD. {10} The elders of the daughter of Zion sit upon the ground, [and] keep silence: they have cast up dust upon their heads; they have girded themselves with sackcloth: the virgins of Jerusalem hang down their heads to the ground. {11} Mine eyes do fail with tears, my bowels are troubled, my liver is poured upon the earth, for the destruction of the daughter of my people; because the children and the sucklings swoon in the streets of the city. {12} They say to their mothers, Where [is] corn [indicating “grain” - figuratively the “Bread” of Life”] and wine [symbolizing the “blood” or “life” of Christ]? when they swooned as the wounded in the streets of the city, when their soul was poured out into their mothers' bosom.”


And, as can be expected, God uses this word to focus on His wrath against the entire earth, which began on May 21, 2011, when mankind entered a prolonged “day of judgment” as these next verses highlight:


The entire chapter of Isa 24 deals with the judgment upon the entire earth and all its nations, and this word is rendered as “languish” and “languisheth” in verse 4 and 7:  “The earth mourneth [and] fadeth away, the world languisheth [’amal:H535] [and] fadeth away, the haughty people of the earth do languish.[’amal:H535] ... {7} The new wine mourneth, the vine languisheth [’amal:H535], all the merryhearted do sigh.


Bashan [Bashan:H1316], Carmel [Karmel:H3760], Lebanon [Lebanown:H3844]  


The places, “Bashan,” “Carmel,” and “Lebanon” (and “Sharon”) can relate to true believers at times, so when we read of them together in the context of Isa 33:9, we discover again God’s wrath being poured out on both the New Testament churches and denominations on May 21, 1988 as well as on the world at large, as of May 21, 2011 


“The earth mourneth [and] languisheth: [’amal:H535] Lebanon [Lebanown:H3844]  

 is ashamed [and] hewn down: Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan [Bashan:H1316] and Carmel [Karmel:H3760] shake off [their fruits].”


I don’t have any more time today to develop this further, so Lord willing, in our next study, we will pick this up.







Nahum - Part 6

February 12, 2017


This is study # 6 in the book of Nahum. I’ll read verses 4-8:  


“ He rebuketh the sea, and maketh it dry, and drieth up all the rivers: Bashan languisheth, and Carmel, and the flower of Lebanon languisheth. {5} The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence, yea, the world, and all that dwell therein. {6} Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him. {7} The LORD [is] good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him. {8} But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies.”


Bashan [Bashan:H1316], Carmel [Karmel:H3760], Lebanon [Lebanown:H3844]  


We left off in our last study looking at the places, “Bashan,” “Carmel,” and “Lebanon” (and “Sharon”) in verse 4, and I made the comment that these places, individually,  can relate to true believers at times, however when we read of them together in the context of Isa 33:9 (the only other place where they are found), we discover again God’s wrath being poured out on both the New Testament churches and denominations on May 21, 1988 as well as on the world at large, as of May 21, 2011 


“The earth mourneth [and] languisheth: [’amal:H535] Lebanon [Lebanown:H3844]  is ashamed [and] hewn down: Sharon is like a wilderness; and Bashan [Bashan:H1316] and Carmel [Karmel:H3760] shake off [their fruits].”


Nahum 1:5 “The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt, and the earth is burned at his presence, yea, the world, and all that dwell therein.”


The Mountains [har:H2022] Quake [ra`ash:H7493] At Him And The Hills  [gib`ah:H1389] Melt [muwg:H4127]


The first phrase in verse 5 is: “The mountains quake at him, and the hills melt…,” and is comprised of four Hebrew words. You might recall that “mountains” as well as “hills” are expressions that refer to “kingdoms” - the kingdom of God or the kingdom of Satan. The two terms, “mountains”  [har:H2022] and “quake” [ra`ash:H7493]  appear together in 6 citations; here are are two examples:


Psa 46:3 makes this declaration within the context of our present “day of judgment,” in which the word “quake,” is rendered here as “shake”: “[Though] the waters thereof roar [and] be troubled, [though] the mountains [har:H2022] shake [ra`ash:H7493] with the swelling thereof. Selah.”


On the other hand, the backdrop of Jer 4 is the “end of the New Testament church age,” and verse 24 makes this affirmation, rendering“quake” as “and lo, they trembled”: “I beheld the mountains, [har:H2022]  and, lo, they trembled, [ra`ash:H7493] and all the hills moved lightly.”


At Him And The Hills  [gib`ah:H1389] Melt [muwg:H4127]


The next two words -  “at him the hills” (gib`ah:H1389) and  “melt” (muwg:H4127) only surface in one other passage - Amos 9:13,


“Behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that the plowman shall overtake the reaper, and the treader of grapes him that soweth seed; and the mountains shall drop sweet wine, and all the hills [gib`ah:H1389]  shall melt.”[muwg:H4127]


The term, “melt” also appears again in verse 6 of Psa 46, as well as in Amos 9:5, both of which describe our present prolonged “day of judgment”:


Psa 46:6 asserts, “The heathen raged, the kingdoms were moved: he uttered his voice, the earth melted.” [muwg:H4127]


Likewise, Amos 9:5 adds, “And the Lord GOD of hosts [is] he that toucheth the land, and it shall melt, [muwg:H4127] and all that dwell therein shall mourn: and it shall rise up wholly like a flood; and shall be drowned, as [by] the flood of Egypt.”


And The Earth [erets:H776] Is Burned [nasa’:H5375] At His Presence [paniym:H6440]


The spiritual fire of God’s wrath is also in evidence in the latter part of Nah 1:5, in the phrase, “...and the earth is burned at his presence…,” which includes three Hebrew words. There are also verses that state that “the earth is burned” in English - such as Isa 24:6 and 2 Pet 3:10 below maintain: 


Verse 6 of Isa 24 is found in a chapter that deals exclusively with our present “day of judgment”: “Therefore hath the curse devoured the earth, and they that dwell therein are desolate: therefore the inhabitants of the earth are burned, and few men left.”


In similar fashion, 2 Pet 3:10, pinpoints the spiritual atmosphere of our current  judgment day (i.e., “hell” or the grave), the end of salvation, and all religious or worldly lies that enslave mankind, along with the “fiery trial” which God is using to manifest His people and their works, while the non-elect of this world are “dead men” who happen to be physically alive temporarily, since May 21, 2011, but are doomed to annihilation: “But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up.”


However, the word translated, “burned” (nasa’:H5375) here in Nah 1:5 is most frequently rendered as “bear up” or “lift up,” as the subsequent passages illustrate, in which judgment is very much in view as well:


Gen 40:19 records the bakers’s dream which Joseph (representing Christ) had correctly interpreted: “Yet within three days shall Pharaoh lift up [nasa’:H5375] thy head from off thee, and shall hang thee on a tree [Deu 21:23 - “...(for he that [is] hanged is accursed of God)…”; and the birds shall eat thy flesh from off thee.”


In Isa 2:12-14, this word is found 3 times, highlighting the “purpose of God”: “For the day of the LORD of hosts [shall be] upon every [one that is] proud and lofty, and upon every [one that is] lifted up; [nasa’:H5375] and he shall be brought low: {13} And upon all the cedars of Lebanon, [that are] high and lifted up, [nasa’:H5375] and upon all the oaks of Bashan, {14} And upon all the high mountains, and upon all the hills [that are] lifted up,” [nasa’:H5375]


Psa 83:2 emphasizes that the ones who oppose God: “For, lo, thine enemies make a tumult: and they that hate thee have lifted up [nasa’:H5375] the head.”


Yea, The World [tebel:H8398] And All That Dwell [yashab:H3427] Therein


The next phrase specifically targets the inhabitants of the world, as these next passages reveal, in which these two Hebrew terms (H8398 and H3427) appear together; note also the two words for “earth” (`erets:H776) and “world” (tebel:H8398) in Nah 1:5 are found here as well:


Psa 33:8 proclaims, Let all the earth [erets:H776]  fear the LORD: let all the inhabitants [yashab:H3427] of the world [tebel:H8398] stand in awe of him.”


And verse 7 of Psa 98:7-9 likewise offers this description of the sea (a picture of “hell,” which is the grave) and actually is a figure of what this world has become spiritually in this unique “day of judgment”: “Let the sea roar, and the fulness thereof; the world, [tebel:H8398] and they that dwell [yashab:H3427] therein. {8} Let the floods clap [their] hands: let the hills be joyful together {9} Before the LORD; for he cometh to judge the earth [erets:H776]: with righteousness shall he judge the world [tebel:H8398], and the people with equity.”


Nahum 1:6  Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him.


Who Can Stand [`amad:H5975] Before [paniym:H6440] His Indignation [za`am:H2195]?


Moving on to verse 6, we read this rhetorical question, “Who can stand before his indignation?” These three words appear together only in this passage; however we find that the term “before” (paniym:H6440) [also translated “at his presence” in Nah 1:5] and “his indignation” (za`am:H2195) do appear in the following three citations, besides here in Nah 1:6. When one considers that the Lord Jesus Christ subjected Himself to the anger and indignation of Almighty God, as “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world” (Rev 13:8), these passages take on a special dimension that staggers our puny minds:


Psa 38:3, “[There is] no soundness in my flesh because [paniym:H6440] of thine anger [za`am:H2195]; neither [is there any] rest in my bones because [paniym:H6440] of my sin.”


Psa 102:10,Because [paniym:H6440] of thine indignation [za`am:H2195] and thy wrath: for thou hast lifted me up, and cast me down.”


Jer 15:17, “I sat not in the assembly of the mockers, nor rejoiced; I sat alone because [paniym:H6440] of thy hand: for thou hast filled me with indignation.” [za`am:H2195]


Notice that in each of the foregoing, H6440 is rendered “because;” only in Nah 1:6 is it translated as “before;” “indignation” (H2195) is rendered as such, except in Psa 38:3, where it appears as “anger.”


Lord willing, we will continue our examination of Nahum 1:6 in our next study.






Nahum - Part 7

March 5, 2017



This is study # 7 in the book of Nahum. I’ll read verses 6-8:  


“Who can stand before his indignation? and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger? his fury is poured out like fire, and the rocks are thrown down by him. {7} The LORD [is] good, a strong hold in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him. {8} But with an overrunning flood he will make an utter end of the place thereof, and darkness shall pursue his enemies.”


Who Can Stand [amad:H5975]


In our last study we looked at the first part of verse 6, so today let’s resume where we left off, which is the next phrase, “and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger?” which is a second rhetorical question, like the one that preceded it - “Who can stand before his indignation?” Both of these remind one of the similar questions found in Mal 3:2, that Handel so beautifully incorporated into his Scripturally based oratorio, “Messiah,” and profoundly characterize the spiritual environment of our world today:


But who may abide the day of his coming? and who shall stand when he appeareth? for he [is] like a refiner's fire, and like fullers' soap:”


The answer to these two rhetorical questions can only be: “God’s elect” - they, alone, possess the ability to stand, which comes with the gift of salvation - during “the day of salvation.” In our previous lesson I did not expand upon this word, “who can stand” (amad:H5975) in Nah 1:6 (as well as in Mal 3:2), so now might be a good time to do that before moving ahead. This term is especially relevant to God’s elect on earth today, who are “waiting” for the completion of their salvation, namely the resurrection of their physical bodies, as we read in verses 15 and 17 of 1 The 4:15-18, in which this particular term only appears in these two citations:


“For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive [and] remain [perileipomai:G4035] unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. {16} For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: {17} Then we which are alive [and] remain [perileipomai:G4035] shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord. {18} Wherefore comfort one another with these words.”


Notice also the reassuring statement regarding these matters in verse 18, “Wherefore comfort one another with these words,” which comports with a similar exhortation in Rom 15:4,


“For whatsoever things were written aforetime were written for our learning [i.e., “doctrine”], that we through patience and comfort of the scriptures might have hope.”


The term, “who can stand” (amad:H5975) in Nah 1:6 (as well as in Mal 3:2), is quite “pregnant” with many nuances (as we have seen with so many words in the Bible) and is translated in the following manner: stood(171x), stand(137x), (“raise, stand...) up(42x), set(32x), stay(17x), still(15x), appointed (10x), standing (10x), endure (8x), remain (8x), present (7x), continue (6x), withstand (6x),waited (5x), establish (5x), and in 42 other miscellaneous ways.  


This word appears in Dan 12:13, as “and stand” in this chapter, in which we have understood that God hid an enormous amount of spiritual truth in the Bible until our day, as verses 4 and 9 reveal: “But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, [even] to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased. ... {9} And he said, Go thy way, Daniel: for the words [are] closed up and sealed till the time of the end… {13} “But go thou thy way till the end [be]: for thou shalt rest, and stand [amad:H5975] in thy lot at the end of the days.”


One of the most dramatic encounters in Scripture is found in Est 5:2, in which Esther, willing to forfeit her own life for the sake of her people (typifying the Lord Jesus Christ) approaches the throne of King Ahasuerus (parabolically representing God the Father) unannounced (recognizing that such an overt act could be punishable by death), and yet, wonderfully, by God’s mercy, she found grace in his eyes: “And it was so, when the king saw Esther the queen standing [amad:H5975] in the court, [that] she obtained favour in his sight: and the king held out to Esther the golden sceptre that [was] in his hand. So Esther drew near, and touched the top of the sceptre”


Isa 66:22 is a glorious affirmation of God’s promise to each of His elect: “For as the new heavens and the new earth, which I will make, shall remain [amad:H5975] before me, saith the LORD, so shall your seed and your name remain.” [amad:H5975]


Sadly, in spite of corporate Israel’s ongoing rebellion (and its spiritual counterpart - the institutional churches and denominations), Jer 6:16 reflects God’s care and concern for these divine institutions: “Thus saith the LORD, Stand [amad:H5975] ye in the ways, and see, and ask for the old paths, where [is] the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall find rest for your souls. But they said, We will not walk [therein].


In Zec 14:12, on the other hand, this expression is used in a negative sense, emphasizing God’s wrath on all the non-elect during our present day, eventuating in their annihilation: “And this shall be the plague wherewith the LORD will smite all the people that have fought against Jerusalem; Their flesh shall consume away while they stand [amad:H5975] upon their feet, and their eyes shall consume away in their holes, and their tongue shall consume away in their mouth.”


And Who Can Abide [quwm:H6965] In The Fierceness [charown:H2740] Of His Anger [’aph:H639]?


The phrase, “and who can abide in the fierceness of his anger,” is comprised of three Hebrew terms, and they are found together in four other passages, and without exception, each underscores God’s judgment, which is always just:


In Num 32:14, Moses speaking to the children of Gad and Reuben regarding their request to settle on that side of Jordan (and not in the Promised Land) alludes to the earlier sin of 10 of the tribal heads (40 years prior) who “walked by sight,” and failed to believe God’s promise that He would give them the land of Canaan:And, behold, ye are risen up [quwm:H6965] in your fathers' stead, an increase of sinful men, to augment yet the fierce [charown:H2740]   anger [’aph:H639] of the LORD toward Israel.”


Jos 7:26 recounts the punishment of Aachan’s sin: And they raised [quwm:H6965] over him a great heap of stones unto this day. So the LORD turned from the fierceness [charown:H2740] of his anger. [’aph:H639] Wherefore the name of that place was called, The valley of Achor, unto this day.”


Jer 30:24, is set against the backdrop of God’s wrath upon the institutional churches and denominations (typified by Judah and Jerusalem): The fierce [charown:H2740]  anger [’aph:H639] of the LORD shall not return, until he have done [it], and until he have performed [quwm:H6965] the intents of his heart: in the latter days ye shall consider it.”


Zep 3:8 explains what is currently underway in our “day of judgment”: “Therefore wait ye upon me, saith the LORD, until the day that I rise up [quwm:H6965] to the prey: for my determination [is] to gather the nations, that I may assemble the kingdoms, to pour upon them mine indignation, [even] all my fierce [charown:H2740] anger [’aph:H639]: for all the earth shall be devoured with the fire of my jealousy.”


His Fury [chemah:H2534] Is Poured Out [nathak:H5413] Like Fire [’esh:H784]


The next phrase, “his fury is poured out like fire,” is also made up of three Hebrew words and only found in one other citation - Eze 22:20 (even though these same words appear by themselves repeatedly in this chapter). I’ll read verse 17-22 for the sake of the context, which again is highlighting God’s judgment against the corporate churches and denominations, which began on May 21, 1998, as 1 Pet 4:17-18 (and its Old Testament counterpart, Jer 25:29) insist:


“And the word of the LORD came unto me, saying, {18} Son of man, the house of Israel is to me become dross [ciyg:H5509]: all they [are] brass, and tin, and iron, and lead, in the midst of the furnace; they are [even] the dross [ciyg:H5509]:of silver. {19} Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Because ye are all become dross, [ciyg:H5509]: behold, therefore I will gather you into the midst of Jerusalem. {20} [As] they gather silver, and brass, and iron, and lead, and tin, into the midst of the furnace, to blow the fire [’esh:H784] upon it, to melt [nathak:H5413] [it]; so will I gather [you] in mine anger and in my fury, [chemah:H2534] and I will leave [you there], and melt [nathak:H5413] you. {21} Yea, I will gather you, and blow upon you in the fire [’esh:H784]  of my wrath, and ye shall be melted [nathak:H5413] in the midst thereof. {22} As silver is melted in the midst of the furnace, so shall ye be melted [nathak:H5413] in the midst thereof; and ye shall know that I the LORD have poured out my fury [chemah:H2534] upon you.”


Please note the threefold usage of the term “dross” (ciyg:H5509) in verses 18-19. It is noteworthy that this chapter on God’s judgment against His corporate people opens up with verses 1-3, which is focusing in on the “city” (`iyr:H5892) - the “bloody city” and “the city sheddeth blood”:


“Moreover the word of the LORD came unto me, saying, {2} Now, thou son of man, wilt thou judge, wilt thou judge the bloody city `[iyr:H5892]? yea, thou shalt shew her all her abominations. {3} Then say thou, Thus saith the Lord GOD, The city [`iyr:H5892] sheddeth blood in the midst of it, that her time may come, and maketh idols against herself to defile herself.”


This emphasis on the sins (i.e., “blood”) of the city is also defined and corroborated in Isa 1:1-4, and 21-25, where we see the same language of “city” and “dross”:


“The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, [and] Hezekiah, kings of Judah. {2} Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. {3} The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib: [but] Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. {4} Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, a seed of evildoers, children that are corrupters: they have forsaken the LORD, they have provoked the Holy One of Israel unto anger, they are gone away backward. ... {21} How is the faithful city [qiryah:H7151- a different word] become an harlot! it was full of judgment; righteousness lodged in it; but now murderers. {22} Thy silver is become dross [ciyg:H5509], thy wine [i.e., “Gospel”] mixed with water: {23} Thy princes [are] rebellious, and companions of thieves: every one loveth gifts, and followeth after rewards: they judge not the fatherless, neither doth the cause of the widow come unto them. {24} Therefore saith the Lord, the LORD of hosts, the mighty One of Israel, Ah, I will ease me of mine adversaries, and avenge me of mine enemies: {25} And I will turn my hand upon thee, and purely purge away thy dross [ciyg:H5509], and take away all thy tin: 


The reason I am concentrating on these comparisons is because they also correspond spiritually to the last phrase in Nah 1:6, “...and the rocks are thrown down by him” which, unfortunately, we won’t have time to address today, but we will in our next study in the book of Nahum, Lord willing.