Bible Ministries International

Bible Studies

A series of verse by verse studies by Gunther von Harringa Sr

Act 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

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Judges 6 - Part 37

October 2, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 37 and today’s date is October 2, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:25-31,


And it came to pass the same night, that the LORD said unto him, Take thy father's young bullock, even the second bullock of seven years old, and throw down the altar of Baal that thy father hath, and cut down the grove that is by it: {26} And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock, in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down. {27} Then Gideon took ten men of his servants, and did as the LORD had said unto him: and so it was, because he feared his father's household, and the men of the city, that he could not do it by day, that he did it by night. {28} And when the men of the city arose early in the morning, behold, the altar of Baal was cast down, and the grove was cut down that was by it, and the second bullock was offered upon the altar that was built. {29} And they said one to another, Who hath done this thing? And when they enquired and asked, they said, Gideon the son of Joash hath done this thing. {30} Then the men of the city said unto Joash, Bring out thy son, that he may die: because he hath cast down the altar of Baal, and because he hath cut down the grove that was by it. {31} And Joash said unto all that stood against him, Will ye plead for Baal? will ye save him? he that will plead for him, let him be put to death whilst it is yet morning: if he be a god, let him plead for himself, because one hath cast down his altar. {32} Therefore on that day he called 

him Jerubbaal, saying, Let Baal plead against him, because he hath thrown down his altar.”


Summary


In our previous study we were investigating the two words in verse 29, “and when they enquired” along with “and asked,” which the “men of the city” queried in order to determine who was responsible for throwing down the altar of Baal and cutting down the grove next to it. These two expressions can either refer to sin and judgment, with the non-elect in view, as these “men of the city” were seeking to kill Gideon for what he had done, in following the instructions of the “angel of the LORD.” Since Gideon is both a “deliverer” and a “judge,” he also typifies the Lord Jesus Christ, Who is both a “deliverer” and a “judge,”  Whom the Jews in His day wanted to kill as well. What is so revealing is that these “men of the city” identified with national Israel, yet they were worshipping Baal, including Gideon’s father and his household!  God also employs these two words - with the elect in view - to “search” and “seek” for God during the day of salvation. Then we began researching verse 30, and the terms,“thy son” and “that he may die.” However, I would like to examine some more passages in which these two words appear together, as we have already examined all the others terms in verse 30 previously. 


Thy Son [ben:H1121] That He May Die [muwth:H4191] (Cont.)


Actually, we have encountered these two terms already in some of our earlier lessons in the book of Judges, as the subsequent verses reveal:


In Judges 2:8 we learn of Joshua’s death age at 110 (10 - “completion” X 11 - Christ was “made flesh” 11,000 years after Creation), which incidentally is the same as Joseph’s,  both of which are great types of the Lord Jesus Christ:  “And Joshua the son [ben:H1121] of Nun, the servant of the LORD, died [muwth:H4191], [being] an hundred and ten years old.” [ben:H1121] 


Judges 3:11 chronicles judge Othniel’s death as well: “And the land had rest forty years. And Othniel the son [ben:H1121] of Kenaz died.” [muwth:H4191]


Judges 4:1 asserts the same with respect to judge Ehud, in which “son” is rendered as “and the children”: And the children [ben:H1121] of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD, when Ehud was dead.” [muwth:H4191]

These next two references have to do with the death of the wicked, and is a dramatic spiritual parable of judgment beginning at the “house of God” first:


 The same historical parable continues with greater intensity in 1 Samuel 4, in which our two words are repeated in verse 11, 17, and 20; I’ll read verses 3-22: “And when the people were come into the camp, the elders of Israel said, Wherefore hath the LORD smitten us to day before the Philistines? Let us fetch the ark of the covenant of the LORD out of Shiloh unto us, that, when it cometh among us, it may save us out of the hand of our enemies. {4} So the people sent to Shiloh, that they might bring from thence the ark of the covenant of the LORD of hosts, which dwelleth [between] the cherubims: and the two sons of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, [were] there with the ark of the covenant of God. {5} And when the ark of the covenant of the LORD came into the camp, all Israel shouted with a great shout, so that the earth rang again. {6} And when the Philistines heard the noise of the shout, they said, What [meaneth] the noise of this great shout in the camp of the Hebrews? And they understood that the ark of the LORD was come into the camp. {7} And the Philistines were afraid, for they said, God is come into the camp. And they said, Woe unto us! for there hath not been such a thing heretofore. {8} Woe unto us! who shall deliver us out of the hand of these mighty Gods? these [are] the Gods that smote the Egyptians with all the plagues in the wilderness. {9} Be strong, and quit yourselves like men, O ye Philistines, that ye be not servants unto the Hebrews, as they have been to you: quit yourselves like men, and fight. {10} And the Philistines fought, and Israel was smitten, and they fled every man into his tent: and there was a very great slaughter; for there fell of Israel thirty thousand footmen. {11} And the ark of God was taken; and the two sons [ben:H1121] of Eli, Hophni and Phinehas, were slain. {12} And there ran a man of Benjamin out of the army, and came to Shiloh the same day with his clothes rent, and with earth upon his head. {13} And when he came, lo, Eli sat upon a seat by the wayside watching: for his heart trembled for the ark of God. And when the man came into the city, and told [it], all the city cried out. {14} And when Eli heard the noise of the crying, he said, What [meaneth] the noise of this tumult? And the man came in hastily, and told Eli. {15} Now Eli was ninety and eight years old; and his eyes were dim, that he could not see. {16} And the man said unto Eli, I [am] he that came out of the army, and I fled to day out of the army. And he said, What is there done, my son? {17} And the messenger answered and said, Israel is fled before the Philistines, and there hath been also a great slaughter among the people, and thy two sons [ben:H1121] also, Hophni and Phinehas, are dead [muwth:H4191], and the ark of God is taken. {18} And it came to pass, when he made mention of the ark of God, that he fell from off the seat backward by the side of the gate, and his neck brake, and he died: for he was an old man, and heavy. And he had judged Israel forty years. {19} And his daughter in law, Phinehas' wife, was with child, [near] to be delivered: and when she heard the tidings that the ark of God was taken, and that her father in law and her husband were dead, she bowed herself and travailed; for her pains came upon her. {20} And about the time of her death [muwth:H4191] the women that stood by her said unto her, Fear not; for thou hast born a son. [ben:H1121] But she answered not, neither did she regard [it]. {21} And she named the child Ichabod, saying, The glory is departed from Israel: because the ark of God was taken, and because of her father in law and her husband. {22} And she said, The glory is departed from Israel: for the ark of God is taken.


Please bear in mind that the Ark of the Covenant which was captured by the Philistines, represents the Lord Jesus Christ. This is why Phinehas’ wife calls her newborn son, “Ichabod,” signifying, “the glory has departed,” which is repeated twice. This is a veiled reference to Christ “departing” from all the churches and denominations, worldwide and without exception, on May 21, 1988.


The last passage is 2 Samuel 18:33, which is another historical parable that highlights the principle of “loving your enemies.” Nathan the prophet had informed David of one of the consequences of David’s double sin of murder and adultery in 2 Samuel 12:9-12,


“Wherefore hast thou despised the commandment of the LORD, to do evil in his sight? thou hast killed Uriah the Hittite with the sword, and hast taken his wife [to be] thy wife, and hast slain him with the sword of the children of Ammon. {10} Now therefore the sword shall never depart from thine house; because thou hast despised me, and hast taken the wife of Uriah the Hittite to be thy wife. {11} Thus saith the LORD, Behold, I will raise up evil against thee out of thine own house, and I will take thy wives before thine eyes, and give [them] unto thy neighbour, and he shall lie with thy wives in the sight of this sun. {12} For thou didst [it] secretly: but I will do this thing before all Israel, and before the sun.”


The “evil...out of thine own house…” refers to David’s son, Absalom, who conspired to steal the kingdom away from David by means of a coup, while endearing himself to the tribes of Israel by his affable character. Prior to David’s men fighting against Absalom and his forces,  David had expressly commanded that his son be not killed, however the captain of David’s army, Joab nevertheless did so. When David heard the sad news of Absalom’s death, he mournfully repeated these words with tremendous grief in 2 Samuel 18:33, again expressing the theme of “loving one’s enemies”: 


 “And the king was much moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept: and as he went, thus he said, O my son [ben:H1121] Absalom, my son [ben:H1121], my son [ben:H1121] Absalom! would God I had died for thee [muwth:H4191], O Absalom, my son [ben:H1121], my son!” [ben:H1121]


Let’s continue by looking at verse 31:


Verse 31: “And Joash said unto all that stood against him, Will ye plead for Baal? will ye save him? he that will plead for him, let him be put to death whilst [it is yet] morning: if he [be] a god, let him plead for himself, because [one] hath cast down his altar.”


We have learned that Joash’s name means “given of God,” and now we witness something unusual as he defends Gideon, and reproves the “men of the city” for coming to Baal’s rescue as it were. After all, we read in verse 25, what the “angel of the LORD” commanded with regard to Gideon’s father: “...throw down the altar of Baal that thy father hath…” 


So, in light of that, let’s investigate the two words, “unto all that stood against him” and “will ye plead”: 


Unto All That Stood Against Him [`amad:H5975] Will Ye Plead [riyb:H7378]


This is another classic example that we find so often in the Bible in which a lone individual (usually one of God’s prophets) is bucking the majority (usually false prophets/non-elect), by insisting on the truth of Scripture. These two terms are found in three other passages:


Nehemiah 13 is a chapter in which Nehemiah, by God’s grace, seeks to implement what God had instructed Israel to do with regard to a variety of laws. In an earlier study we visited the latter part of this chapter, as he sought to bring back the sanctity of the (seventh day) Sabbath that was being violated in a number of ways. One of the issues he rectified was the “portions” (or tithes) that had not been given to the Levites and singers, forcing them to return to their own fields as a result. These two words arise in verse 11, as “then contended” along with “and set;” I’ll read verses 10-13,


“And I perceived that the portions of the Levites had not been given [them]: for the Levites and the singers, that did the work, were fled every one to his field. {11} Then contended [riyb:H7378] I with the rulers, and said, Why is the house of God forsaken? And I gathered them together, and set [`amad:H5975] them in their place. {12} Then brought all Judah the tithe of the corn and the new wine and the oil unto the treasuries. {13} And I made treasurers over the treasuries, Shelemiah the priest, and Zadok the scribe, and of the Levites, Pedaiah: and next to them [was] Hanan the son of Zaccur, the son of Mattaniah: for they were counted faithful, and their office [was] to distribute unto their brethren.” 


Isaiah 3 is another chapter that speaks about God’s judgment beginning with Judah and Jerusalem for their sin of spiritual adultery (and by extension, the churches and denominations that fell under the wrath of God, beginning with the Great Tribulation on May 21, 1988.) These two expressions are translated as, “to plead” along with “and standeth” (the second one) in verse 13, and I’ll read down to verse 15: 


“The LORD standeth up to plead [riyb:H7378], and standeth [`amad:H5975] to judge the people. {14} The LORD will enter into judgment with the ancients of his people, and the princes thereof: for ye have eaten up the vineyard; the spoil of the poor [is] in your houses. {15} What mean ye [that] ye beat my people to pieces, and grind the faces of the poor? saith the Lord GOD of hosts.”


The last entry in which these two words are found is in Isaiah 50:8, and I’ll read from verses 4-8, which is another magnificent portrait of the Lord Jesus Christ as both Eternal God, in addition to the “Suffering” Servant:


“The Lord GOD hath given me the tongue of the learned, that I should know how to speak a word in season to [him that is] weary: he wakeneth morning by morning, he wakeneth mine ear to hear as the learned. {5} The Lord GOD hath opened mine ear, and I was not rebellious, neither turned away back. {6} I gave my back to the smiters, and my cheeks to them that plucked off the hair: I hid not my face from shame and spitting. {7} For the Lord GOD will help me; therefore shall I not be confounded: therefore have I set my face like a flint, and I know that I shall not be ashamed. {8} [He is] near that justifieth me; who will contend [riyb:H7378] with me? let us stand [`amad:H5975] together: who [is] mine adversary? let him come near to me.”


That will have to conclude today’s study, as we are out of time. Lord willing, we will pick this up in our next study.

Judges 6 - Part 38

October 4, 2019



Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 38 and today’s date is October 4, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:25-31,


And it came to pass the same night, that the LORD said unto him, Take thy father's young bullock, even the second bullock of seven years old, and throw down the altar of Baal that thy father hath, and cut down the grove that is by it: {26} And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock, in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down. {27} Then Gideon took ten men of his servants, and did as the LORD had said unto him: and so it was, because he feared his father's household, and the men of the city, that he could not do it by day, that he did it by night. {28} And when the men of the city arose early in the morning, behold, the altar of Baal was cast down, and the grove was cut down that was by it, and the second bullock was offered upon the altar that was built. {29} And they said one to another, Who hath done this thing? And when they enquired and asked, they said, Gideon the son of Joash hath done this thing. {30} Then the men of the city said unto Joash, Bring out thy son, that he may die: because he hath cast down the altar of Baal, and because he hath cut down the grove that was by it. {31} And Joash said unto all that stood against him, Will ye plead for Baal? will ye save him? he that will plead for him, let him be put to death whilst it is yet morning: if he be a god, let him plead for himself, because one hath cast down his altar. {32} Therefore on that day he called 

him Jerubbaal, saying, Let Baal plead against him, because he hath thrown down his altar.”


We have arrived at the latter part of verse 31 in our on-going study of the book of Judges, and the phrase, “...will ye save him?” which is the question that Joash asked the “men of the city.” We have already discussed this word in verses 14-15 of this chapter, and it is normally translated as, “deliver” or “save.”  Joash goes on to boldly declare: “...he that will plead for him [Baal] let him be put to death…”


He That Will Plead [riyb:H7378] For Him Let Him Be Put To Death [muwth:H4191]


We have already considered these terms individually, or with other words, however they do surface together in two other citations, and we’ll examine one of them in 1 Samuel 25 which is a historical parable, and these two expressions emerge in verse 39,

“ And when David heard that Nabal was dead [muwth:H4191], he said, Blessed [be] the LORD, that hath pleaded [riyb:H7378] the cause [riyb:H7379] of my reproach from the hand of Nabal, and hath kept his servant from evil: for the LORD hath returned the wickedness of Nabal upon his own head. And David sent and communed with Abigail, to take her to him to wife.”


In this verse the Hebrew verb, “that hath pleaded” is the root word for the identically spelled noun form, “the cause.” This account underscores, among many other truths, that “vengeance belongs to the LORD” as we read in Romans 12:19 (which is quoting Deuteronomy 32:35):


“Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but [rather] give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance [is] mine; I will repay, saith the Lord.


We have already considered the rest of the words in verses 31-32, so let’s move on to verses 33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


Verse 33: “Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel.” 


In Judges 6:3 we also ran across these three nations that came against Israel that are also mentioned in verse 33 - “the Midianites,” “the Amalekites,” and “the children of the east,” so the next phrase that we want to investigate is “...were gathered together…,” which consists of two words:


Were Gathered [’acaph:H622] Together [yachad:H3162]


These two terms are found together in the following four citations:


Deuteronomy 33:5 contains these two expressions, and this chapter has to do with Moses blessing the 12 tribes, who in this context, picture the “fullness” of God’s elect; I’ll read the first five verses:


“And this [is] the blessing, wherewith Moses the man of God blessed the children of Israel before his death. {2} And he said, The LORD came from Sinai, and rose up from Seir unto them; he shined forth from mount Paran, and he came with ten thousands of saints: from his right hand [went] a fiery law for them. {3} Yea, he loved the people; all his saints [are] in thy hand: and they sat down at thy feet; [every one] shall receive of thy words. {4} Moses commanded us a law, [even] the inheritance of the congregation of Jacob. {5} And he was king in Jeshurun, when the heads of the people [and] the tribes of Israel were gathered [’acaph:H622] together.” [yachad:H3162]


On the other hand in verse 15 of 2 Samuel 10:1-15, it is the Syrians who “seek to gather themselves together” - by hiring others, to come against Israel the second time, and are unsuccessful. All of this came about because they foolishly misread David’s intentions to honor the late Nahash, the father of Hanun, the newly appointed king:


“And it came to pass after this, that the king of the children of Ammon died, and Hanun his son reigned in his stead. {2} Then said David, I will shew kindness unto Hanun the son of Nahash, as his father shewed kindness unto me. And David sent to comfort him by the hand of his servants for his father. And David's servants came into the land of the children of Ammon. {3} And the princes of the children of Ammon said unto Hanun their lord, Thinkest thou that David doth honour thy father, that he hath sent comforters unto thee? hath not David [rather] sent his servants unto thee, to search the city, and to spy it out, and to overthrow it? {4} Wherefore Hanun took David's servants, and shaved off the one half of their beards, and cut off their garments in the middle, [even] to their buttocks, and sent them away. {5} When they told [it] unto David, he sent to meet them, because the men were greatly ashamed: and the king said, Tarry at Jericho until your beards be grown, and [then] return. {6} And when the children of Ammon saw that they stank before David, the children of Ammon sent and hired the Syrians of Bethrehob, and the Syrians of Zoba, twenty thousand footmen, and of king Maacah a thousand men, and of Ishtob twelve thousand men. {7} And when David heard of [it], he sent Joab, and all the host of the mighty men. {8} And the children of Ammon came out, and put the battle in array at the entering in of the gate: and the Syrians of Zoba, and of Rehob, and Ishtob, and Maacah, [were] by themselves in the field. {9} When Joab saw that the front of the battle was against him before and behind, he chose of all the choice [men] of Israel, and put [them] in array against the Syrians: {10} And the rest of the people he delivered into the hand of Abishai his brother, that he might put [them] in array against the children of Ammon. {11} And he said, If the Syrians be too strong for me, then thou shalt help me: but if the children of Ammon be too strong for thee, then I will come and help thee. {12} Be of good courage, and let us play the men for our people, and for the cities of our God: and the LORD do that which seemeth him good. {13} And Joab drew nigh, and the people that [were] with him, unto the battle against the Syrians: and they fled before him. {14} And when the children of Ammon saw that the Syrians were fled, then fled they also before Abishai, and entered into the city. So Joab returned from the children of Ammon, and came to Jerusalem. {15} And when the Syrians saw that they were smitten before Israel, they gathered [’acaph:H622] themselves together.”  [yachad:H3162]


The next citation in which these two terms appear together is in verse 9 of Isaiah 43, which is a chapter in which the subject matter toggles between corporate Israel, Christ, and the elect, and specifically the “gathering in” from “the nations of the elect” - from the east/west/north/south/ - as verse 5 underscores. I’ll read from verses 1-12,


“But now thus saith the LORD that created thee, O Jacob, and he that formed thee, O Israel, Fear not: for I have redeemed thee, I have called [thee] by thy name; thou [art] mine. {2} When thou passest through the waters, I [will be] with thee; and through the rivers, they shall not overflow thee: when thou walkest through the fire, thou shalt not be burned; neither shall the flame kindle upon thee. {3} For I [am] the LORD thy God, the Holy One of Israel, thy Saviour: I gave Egypt [for] thy ransom, Ethiopia and Seba for thee. {4} Since thou wast precious in my sight, thou hast been honourable, and I have loved thee: therefore will I give men for thee, and people for thy life. {5} Fear not: for I [am] with thee: I will bring thy seed from the east, and gather thee from the west; {6} I will say to the north, Give up; and to the south, Keep not back: bring my sons from far, and my daughters from the ends of the earth; {7} [Even] every one that is called by my name: for I have created him for my glory, I have formed him; yea, I have made him. {8} Bring forth the blind people that have eyes, and the deaf that have ears. {9} Let all the nations be gathered together [yachad:H3162], and let the people be assembled [’acaph:H622]: who among them can declare this, and shew us former things? let them bring forth their witnesses, that they may be justified: or let them hear, and say, [It is] truth. {10} Ye [are] my witnesses, saith the LORD, and my servant whom I have chosen: that ye may know and believe me, and understand that I [am] he: before me there was no God formed, neither shall there be after me. {11} I, [even] I, [am] the LORD; and beside me [there is] no saviour. {12} I have declared, and have saved, and I have shewed, when [there was] no strange [god] among you: therefore ye [are] my witnesses, saith the LORD, that I [am] God.”


Verse 12 of Micah 2:1-13 is the last reference, in which these two words are used together: “Woe to them that devise iniquity, and work evil upon their beds! when the morning is light, they practise it, because it is in the power of their hand. {2} And they covet fields, and take [them] by violence; and houses, and take [them] away: so they oppress a man and his house, even a man and his heritage. {3} Therefore thus saith the LORD; Behold, against this family do I devise an evil, from which ye shall not remove your necks; neither shall ye go haughtily: for this time [is] evil. {4} In that day shall [one] take up a parable against you, and lament with a doleful lamentation, [and] say, We be utterly spoiled: he hath changed the portion of my people: how hath he removed [it] from me! turning away he hath divided our fields. {5} Therefore thou shalt have none that shall cast a cord by lot in the congregation of the LORD. {6} Prophesy ye not, [say they to them that] prophesy: they shall not prophesy to them, [that] they shall not take shame. {7} O [thou that art] named the house of Jacob, is the spirit of the LORD straitened? [are] these his doings? do not my words do good to him that walketh uprightly? {8} Even of late my people is risen up as an enemy: ye pull off the robe with the garment from them that pass by securely as men averse from war. {9} The women of my people have ye cast out from their pleasant houses; from their children have ye taken away my glory for ever. {10} Arise ye, and depart; for this [is] not [your] rest: because it is polluted, it shall destroy [you], even with a sore destruction. {11} If a man walking in the spirit and falsehood do lie, [saying], I will prophesy unto thee of wine and of strong drink; he shall even be the prophet of this people. {12} I will surely [’acaph:H622] assemble [’acaph:H622], O Jacob, all of thee; I will surely [parats:H6555] gather [parats:H6555]  the remnant of Israel; I will put them together [yachad:H3162 as the sheep of Bozrah, as the flock in the midst of their fold: they shall make great noise by reason of [the multitude of] men. {13} The breaker is come up before them: they have broken up, and have passed through the gate, and are gone out by it: and their king shall pass before them, and the LORD on the head of them.”


Verse 12 is very interesting because of a dual duplication of terms that God employs. H622 is rendered twice as “I will surely,” and “assemble.” Then a different Hebrew word (parats:H6555) - but with the same meaning -  is translated as, “all of thee I will surely” and “gather.” Once again in this passage we see  corporate Israel (typifying judgment beginning first at God’s “house”) in view, along with “remnant of Israel,” who typify God’s elect sheep that He saved during the “Latter Rain” that took place during the last 17 years or so of the Great Tribulation, from September 7, 1994 - May 21, 2011, completing the Body of Christ.


Spiritually this “gathering together” of elect and non-elect is also seen in the New Testament, as it took place during the church age, according to Matthew 13:30, 


“Let both grow together until the harvest: and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.:


This separation also continued throughout the Great Tribulation, outside of the churches and denominations, as Luke 17:26-37 warns, 


“And as it was in the days of Noe, so shall it be also in the days of the Son of man. {27} They did eat, they drank, they married wives, they were given in marriage, until the day that Noe entered into the ark, and the flood came, and destroyed them all. {28} Likewise also as it was in the days of Lot; they did eat, they drank, they bought, they sold, they planted, they builded; {29} But the same day that Lot went out of Sodom it rained fire and brimstone from heaven, and destroyed [them] all. {30} Even thus shall it be in the day when the Son of man is revealed. {31} In that day, he which shall be upon the housetop, and his stuff in the house, let him not come down to take it away: and he that is in the field, let him likewise not return back. {32} Remember Lot's wife. {33} Whosoever shall seek to save his life shall lose it; and whosoever shall lose his life shall preserve it. {34} I tell you, in that night there shall be two [men] in one bed; the one shall be taken, and the other shall be left. {35} Two [women] shall be grinding together; the one shall be taken, and the other left. {36} Two [men] shall be in the field; the one shall be taken, and the other left. {37} And they answered and said unto him, Where, Lord? And he said unto them, Wheresoever the body [is], thither will the eagles be gathered together.”


Lastly, in our current day of judgment the spiritual status of every human being is fixed and unalterable, as we read in Revelation 22:11, 


“He that is unjust, let him be unjust still: and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still: and he that is righteous, let him be righteous still: and he that is holy, let him be holy still.” 


Lord willing, in our next study we will continue examining the rest of verse 33 and 34.







Judges 6 - Part 39

October 7, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 39 and today’s date is October 7, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


We are down to the last eight verses of this chapter, and the latter part of verse 33, “...and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel.” speaking about these three enemies of Israel - the Midianites, the Amalekites, and the children of the east. Actually it might be helpful to take a closer look at the background of each of these three groups first, and then the rest of verse can be addressed.


Then All The Midianites [Midyan:H4080]


This word, “Midianites” (H4080) is identically spelled as its root word, “midyan” (H4079), which is rendered as “contention” or “strife.” In Genesis 25:1-2 we learn that “Midyan” was one of six sons that Keturah bore to Abraham, after he married again, after Sarah died:


“Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name [was] Keturah. {2} And she bare him Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian [Midyan:H4080], and Ishbak, and Shuah.”


You might recall that Balaam was asked by both the Moabites as well as the Midianites to curse Israel in Numbers 22:1-7, as the land of Midian bordered the territory of the Moabites, as they attempted to “strive” with Israel:


“And the children of Israel set forward, and pitched in the plains of Moab on this side Jordan [by] Jericho. {2} And Balak the son of Zippor saw all that Israel had done to the Amorites. {3} And Moab was sore afraid of the people, because they [were] many: and Moab was distressed because of the children of Israel. {4} And Moab said unto the elders of Midian [Midyan:H4080], Now shall this company lick up all [that are] round about us, as the ox licketh up the grass of the field. And Balak the son of Zippor [was] king of the Moabites at that time. {5} He sent messengers therefore unto Balaam the son of Beor to Pethor, which [is] by the river of the land of the children of his people, to call him, saying, Behold, there is a people come out from Egypt: behold, they cover the face of the earth, and they abide over against me: {6} Come now therefore, I pray thee, curse me this people; for they [are] too mighty for me: peradventure I shall prevail, [that] we may smite them, and [that] I may drive them out of the land: for I wot that he whom thou blessest [is] blessed, and he whom thou cursest is cursed. {7} And the elders of Moab and the elders of Midian [Midyan:H4080] departed with the rewards of divination in their hand; and they came unto Balaam, and spake unto him the words of Balak.”


Another notable account in which “contention” arose between Israel and Midian surfaces in Numbers 25:1-18, as Israel committed whoredom with the daughters of Moab, worshipped Baalpeor, along with the incident in which one of the Israelites brazenly brought a Midianitish woman into the camp; the word “Midianitish” or “Midianitish woman” (H4084) is a derivative of “Midian” (H4080)


“And Israel abode in Shittim, and the people began to commit whoredom with the daughters of Moab. {2} And they called the people unto the sacrifices of their gods: and the people did eat, and bowed down to their gods. {3} And Israel joined himself unto Baalpeor: and the anger of the LORD was kindled against Israel. {4} And the LORD said unto Moses, Take all the heads of the people, and hang them up before the LORD against the sun, that the fierce anger of the LORD may be turned away from Israel. {5} And Moses said unto the judges of Israel, Slay ye every one his men that were joined unto Baalpeor. {6} And, behold, one of the children of Israel came and brought unto his brethren a Midianitish woman [midyaniy:H4084] in the sight of Moses, and in the sight of all the congregation of the children of Israel, who [were] weeping [before] the door of the tabernacle of the congregation. {7} And when Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, the son of Aaron the priest, saw [it], he rose up from among the congregation, and took a javelin in his hand; {8} And he went after the man of Israel into the tent, and thrust both of them through, the man of Israel, and the woman through her belly. So the plague was stayed from the children of Israel. {9} And those that died in the plague were twenty and four thousand. {10} And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {11} Phinehas, the son of Eleazar, the son of Aaron the priest, hath turned my wrath away from the children of Israel, while he was zealous for my sake among them, that I consumed not the children of Israel in my jealousy. {12} Wherefore say, Behold, I give unto him my covenant of peace: {13} And he shall have it, and his seed after him, [even] the covenant of an everlasting priesthood; because he was zealous for his God, and made an atonement for the children of Israel. {14} Now the name of the Israelite that was slain, [even] that was slain with the Midianitish woman [midyaniy:H4084] , [was] Zimri, the son of Salu, a prince of a chief house among the Simeonites. {15} And the name of the Midianitish [midyaniy:H4084]  woman that was slain [was] Cozbi, the daughter of Zur; he [was] head over a people, [and] of a chief house in Midian [Midyan:H4080]. {16} And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {17} Vex the Midianites [midyaniy:H4084], and smite them: {18} For they vex you with their wiles, wherewith they have beguiled you in the matter of Peor, and in the matter of Cozbi, the daughter of a prince of Midian [Midyan:H4080], their sister, which was slain in the day of the plague for Peor's sake.”  


Numbers 31 is another chapter in which God commanded Moses prior to his death to fight against the Midianites as we read in verses 1-8,


“And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {2} Avenge the children of Israel of the Midianites: afterward shalt thou be gathered unto thy people. {3} And Moses spake unto the people, saying, Arm some of yourselves unto the war, and let them go against the Midianites, and avenge the LORD of Midian. {4} Of every tribe a thousand, throughout all the tribes of Israel, shall ye send to the war. {5} So there were delivered out of the thousands of Israel, a thousand of [every] tribe, twelve thousand armed for war. {6} And Moses sent them to the war, a thousand of [every] tribe, them and Phinehas the son of Eleazar the priest, to the war, with the holy instruments, and the trumpets to blow in his hand. {7} And they warred against the Midianites, as the LORD commanded Moses; and they slew all the males. {8} And they slew the kings of Midian, beside the rest of them that were slain; [namely], Evi, and Rekem, and Zur, and Hur, and Reba, five kings of Midian: Balaam also the son of Beor they slew with the sword.”


And The Amalekites [`Amaleq:H6002]


Next we want to consider the Amalekites, and what God has to say about them. We learn from Genesis 36:8-10 and 12 that Amalek was the grandson of Esau through Esau’s son, Eliphaz and his concubine, Timna. This is highly significant because of what we read about in the Old and New Testaments concerning Esau, which we can discuss a little later:  


Thus dwelt Esau in mount Seir: Esau [is] Edom. {9} And these [are] the generations of Esau the father of the Edomites in mount Seir: {10} These [are] the names of Esau's sons; Eliphaz the son of Adah the wife of Esau, Reuel the son of Bashemath the wife of Esau. ... {12} And Timna was concubine to Eliphaz Esau's son; and she bare to Eliphaz Amalek: these [were] the sons of Adah Esau's wife.”


In Judges 5 - Part 20 we touched upon Amalek as the following passages reveal:


Amalek is mentioned in Balaam’s parable in Numbers 24:20 is this very significant statement, when we consider that there are only two spiritual “nations” in view - the elect and the non-elect: “And when he looked on Amalek, [`Amaleq:H6002] he took up his parable, and said, Amalek [`Amaleq:H6002] [was] the first of the nations; but his latter end [shall be] that he perish for ever.”


Deuteronomy 25:17-19 also provides some pertinent details; please note the frightening accusation at the end of verse 18, “and he feared not God”: “Remember what Amalek [`Amaleq:H6002] did unto thee by the way, when ye were come forth out of Egypt; {18} How he met thee by the way, and smote the hindmost of thee, [even] all [that were] feeble behind thee, when thou [wast] faint and weary; and he feared not God. {19} Therefore it shall be, when the LORD thy God hath given thee rest from all thine enemies round about, in the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee [for] an inheritance to possess it, [that] thou shalt blot out the remembrance of Amalek [`Amaleq:H6002] from under heaven; thou shalt not forget [it].”


This is also corroborated by 1 Samuel 15:2 and 18 as well: “Thus saith the LORD of hosts, I remember [that] which Amalek [`Amaleq:H6002] did to Israel, how he laid [wait] for him in the way, when he came up from Egypt… {18} And the LORD sent thee [king Saul] on a journey, and said, Go and utterly destroy the sinners [chatta’:H2400] the Amalekites [`Amaleq:H6002], and fight against them until they be consumed.”


The fact that Amalek is Esau’s grandson is significant because Esau represents the non-elect, as well as the churches and denominations that came under the wrath of God, when God’s judgment began at His own “house.” You might recall what God says concerning him in these next citations:


We read in Genesis 25:34 that Esau despised his “birthright” and the “birthright” pictures the Lord Jesus Christ: “Then Jacob gave Esau bread and pottage of lentiles; and he did eat and drink, and rose up, and went his way: thus Esau despised [his] birthright.


Hebrews 12:15-17 adds this commentary: “Looking diligently lest any man fail of the grace of God; lest any root of bitterness springing up trouble [you], and thereby many be defiled; {16} Lest there [be] any fornicator, or profane person, as Esau, who for one morsel of meat sold his birthright. {17} For ye know how that afterward, when he would have inherited the blessing, he was rejected: for he found no place of repentance, though he sought it carefully with tears.”  


The “tears” that Esau exhibited were not “tears” of repentance - or “godly sorrow” -  but rather “tears” of regret, or the “sorrrow of the world”  as 2 Corinthians 7:10 maintains,


“For godly sorrow worketh repentance to salvation not to be repented of: but the sorrow of the world worketh death.”


And The Children [ben:H1121] Of The East [qedem:H6924]


The last group that we read about in Judges 6:33 are “the children of the east.” 


The term, “east,” is also translated as “old,” “ancient,” “eastward,” and even, “eternal” and is the direction of the sunrise, and can typify God Himself, and by extension, God’s elect. However, that is not what is in view in our passage, and these “children of the east” are the enemies of Israel. Here are some of the ways that God employs this term: 


In Numbers 34:15, we see that is linked with the “sunrising”: “The two tribes and the half tribe have received their inheritance on this side Jordan [near] Jericho eastward [qedem:H6924], toward the sunrising.”


This word crops up in the very beginning of the Bible in Genesis 2:8, and is translated as “eastward”: “And the LORD God planted a garden eastward [qedem:H6924] in Eden; and there he put the man whom he had formed.”


In Deuteronomy 33:15 and 27, these terms are rendered as “of the ancient” and “the eternal,” as they relate to God Himself and His kingdom: “And for the chief things of the ancient [qedem:H6924] mountains, and for the precious things of the lasting hills, ... {27} The eternal [qedem:H6924] God [is thy] refuge, and underneath [are] the everlasting arms: and he shall thrust out the enemy from before thee; and shall say, Destroy [them].”


1 Kings 4:30  is expressed as, “of the east country”: “And Solomon's wisdom excelled the wisdom of all the children of the east country [qedem:H6924], and all the wisdom of Egypt.”


Job, in Job 1:3 is associated with “the east” as well: “His substance also was seven thousand sheep, and three thousand camels, and five hundred yoke of oxen, and five hundred she asses, and a very great household; so that this man was the greatest of all the men of the east.” [qedem:H6924]


We will have to stop here today, and Lord willing, in our next study, continue to examine the rest of verse 33.

Judges 6 - Part 40

October 9, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 40 and today’s date is October 9, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


In our previous study we looked at some of the background of these three enemies - the Midianites, the Amalekites, and children of the east - who had joined forces against Israel. Let’s pick up with the last part of verse 33 which states:


“...and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel.” 


We have already looked at the terms, “and went over” along with “and pitched” in some of our earlier lessons, so let’s consider the phrase, “in the valley of Jezreel,” which consists of two words: “in the valley” (`emeq:H6010) and “of Jezreel” (Yira@`e’l:H3157)


Back in Judges 5, I mentioned Jezreel, which is in the same general vicinity that the battle of Sisera against the forces of Barak and Deborah (aided by Zebulun and Naphtali) -  took place, near Megiddo and Taanach. Additionally, the last “good” king of Judah, Josiah was killed in battle at Megiddo, as he went against Pharaohnechoh in 2 Kings 23:29-30, 


“In his days Pharaohnechoh king of Egypt went up against the king of Assyria to the river Euphrates: and king Josiah went against him; and he slew him at Megiddo, [Megiddown:H4023] when he had seen him. {30} And his servants carried him in a chariot dead from Megiddo, [Megiddown:H4023] and brought him to Jerusalem, and buried him in his own sepulchre. And the people of the land took Jehoahaz the son of Josiah, and anointed him, and made him king in his father's stead.”


2 Chronicles 35:22 adds this declaration: “Nevertheless Josiah would not turn his face from him, but disguised himself, that he might fight with him, and hearkened not unto the words of Necho from the mouth of God, and came to fight in the valley of Megiddo.” [Megiddown:H4023]


The death of Josiah (who also represents Christ - since Christ “departed” (all the New Testament churches worldwide and without exception) is what Zechariah 12:11 is referring to, and is a noteworthy spiritual time marker in the Biblical Calendar of History:  


“In that day shall there be a great mourning in Jerusalem, as the mourning of Hadadrimmon in the valley of Megiddon.” 


In other words the death of good king Josiah spiritually mirrors Christ (or the Holy Spirit) purposefully abdicating the “house of God” (according to 1 Peter 4:17, Jeremiah 25:29, Ezekiel 9:5-7). As a result that formerly divine institution would be missing its “Head,” - no longer making it divine, and thereby lacking all the blessings that its Head had bestowed upon them for 1955 years (from May 22, 33 AD - May 21, 1988).


The Kishon (Qiyshown:H7028) River is mentioned as well in Judges 5 in the same vicinity. In this same location, Elijah killed the prophets of Baal, after the contest with them on Mount Carmel, by the “brook, Kishon,” both of which are in the same area, as we learn from 1 Kings 18:19-20, and 40,


1 Kings 18:19-20 and 40 record the following conversation between king Ahab and Elijah “Now therefore send, [and] gather to me all Israel unto mount Carmel, and the prophets of Baal four hundred and fifty, and the prophets of the groves four hundred, which eat at Jezebel's table. {20} So Ahab sent unto all the children of Israel, and gathered the prophets together unto mount Carmel....{40} And Elijah said unto them, Take the prophets of Baal; let not one of them escape. And they took them: and Elijah brought them down to the brook Kishon, and slew them there.”


One other very important event in this location is that Saul - who represents the end-time institutional churches and denominations - and his three sons were killed in the vicinity of Mt. Gilboa, near the plain of Jezreel, which is in proximity to Taanach and Megiddo, as we read in 1 Samuel 31:8-10, 


“And it came to pass on the morrow, when the Philistines came to strip the slain, that they found Saul and his three sons fallen in mount Gilboa. {9} And they cut off his head, and stripped off his armour, and sent into the land of the Philistines round about, to publish [it in] the house of their idols, and among the people. {10} And they put his armour in the house of Ashtaroth [a false goddess]: and they fastened his body to the wall of Bethshan.[“house of rest or ease”] 


There is one additional reference to “Megiddo” in the New Testament in Revelation 16:12-16, which further confirms the spiritual picture that is being presented in all these battles, namely the warfare between the kingdom of God and the kingdom of Satan:  


“And the sixth angel poured out his vial upon the great river Euphrates; and the water thereof was dried up, that the way of the kings of the east might be prepared. {13} And I saw three unclean spirits like frogs [come] out of the mouth of the dragon, and out of the mouth of the beast, and out of the mouth of the false prophet. {14} For they are the spirits of devils, working miracles, [which] go forth unto the kings of the earth and of the whole world, to gather them to the battle of that great day of God Almighty. {15} Behold, I come as a thief. Blessed [is] he that watcheth, and keepeth his garments, lest he walk naked, and they see his shame.{16} And he gathered them into a place called in the Hebrew tongue Armageddon.” [Harmagedon:G717]


The Greek word, “Armageddon” (Harmegeddon:G717) stems from the compound Hebrew word signifying “the mountain” (har:G2022) and “ of Megiddo” (Megiddown:H4023)


This in turn, brings us to Judges 6:33, in which Gideon’s battle against the Midianites and Amalekites is being assembled in the nearby  “valley of Jezreel,”  once again picturing the battle between the forces of Satan and the Kingdom of God.


In The Valley [`emeq:H6010] Of Jezreel [Yizr@`e’l:H3157]


Incidentally, Jezreel is a compound word signifying “God sows.” These two words surface in verse 16 of Joshua 17:13-18 as, “and [they] who [are] of the valley” and “of Jezreel”: “Yet it came to pass, when the children of Israel were waxen strong, that they put the Canaanites to tribute; but did not utterly drive them out. {14} And the children of Joseph spake unto Joshua, saying, Why hast thou given me [but] one lot and one portion to inherit, seeing I [am] a great people, forasmuch as the LORD hath blessed me hitherto? {15} And Joshua answered them, If thou [be] a great people, [then] get thee up to the wood [country], and cut down for thyself there in the land of the Perizzites and of the giants, if mount Ephraim be too narrow for thee. {16} And the children of Joseph said, The hill is not enough for us: and all the Canaanites that dwell in the land of the valley have chariots of iron, [both they] who [are] of Bethshean and her towns, and [they] who [are] of the valley [`emeq:H6010] of Jezreel. [Yizr@`e’l:H3157] {17} And Joshua spake unto the house of Joseph, [even] to Ephraim and to Manasseh, saying, Thou [art] a great people, and hast great power: thou shalt not have one lot [only]: {18} But the mountain shall be thine; for it [is] a wood, and thou shalt cut it down: and the outgoings of it shall be thine: for thou shalt drive out the Canaanites, though they have iron chariots, [and] though they [be] strong.”


The other passage in which these two expressions emerge is in verse 5 of Hosea 1:1-11, which is a chapter that presents a historical parable - actually a living tableau -  in which Hosea is commanded to marry a harlot (Gomer) who then bears him three children: Jezreel (a boy), a girl, Loruhamah (or “no mercy”), and then another boy, Loammi (“not my people”), by which God is highlighting his divorce from both Israel and Judah corporately (typifying that judgment begins at the “house of God” first) but also explaining that spiritually He will save them, as they represent the elect who make up the eternal Body of Christ:


“The word of the LORD that came unto Hosea, the son of Beeri, in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, [and] Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and in the days of Jeroboam the son of Joash, king of Israel. {2} The beginning of the word of the LORD by Hosea. And the LORD said to Hosea, Go, take unto thee a wife of whoredoms and children of whoredoms: for the land hath committed great whoredom, [departing] from the LORD. {3} So he went and took Gomer the daughter of Diblaim [“two cakes” of figs]; which conceived, and bare him a son. {4} And the LORD said unto him, Call his name Jezreel [Yizr@`e’l:H3157]; for yet a little [while], and I will avenge the blood of Jezreel upon the house of Jehu, and will cause to cease the kingdom of the house of Israel. {5} And it shall come to pass at that day, that I will break the bow of Israel in the valley [`emeq:H6010] of Jezreel. [Yizr@`e’l:H3157] {6} And she conceived again, and bare a daughter. And [God] said unto him, Call her name Loruhamah: for I will no more have mercy upon the house of Israel; but I will utterly take them away. {7} But I will have mercy upon the house of Judah, and will save them by the LORD their God, and will not save them by bow, nor by sword, nor by battle, by horses, nor by horsemen. {8} Now when she had weaned Loruhamah, she conceived, and bare a son. {9} Then said [God], Call his name Loammi: for ye [are] not my people, and I will not be your [God]. {10} Yet the number of the children of Israel shall be as the sand of the sea, which cannot be measured nor numbered; and it shall come to pass, [that] in the place where it was said unto them, Ye [are] not my people, [there] it shall be said unto them, [Ye are] the sons of the living God. {11} Then shall the children of Judah and the children of Israel be gathered together, and appoint themselves one head, and they shall come up out of the land: for great [shall be] the day of Jezreel.” [Yizr@`e’l:H3157]


Let’s proceed to  to Judges 6:34,


Verse 34: “But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him.”


But The Spirit [ruwach:H7307] Of The LORD [Yehovah:H3068]


We have seen the two terms, “but the spirit” and “of the LORD” with regard to Judge Othniel in Judges 3:10, and we will encounter it again in the book of Judges in connection with Jephthah and Samson. It is an expression which can definitely relate to God’s elect, but also to the non-elect, as in the case of King Saul for instance, in which God used him temporarily for His own purposes:


And the Spirit [ruwach:H7307]  of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]

 came upon him, and he judged Israel, and went out to war: and the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] delivered Chushanrishathaim king of Mesopotamia into his hand; and his hand prevailed against Chushanrishathaim.” 


Came [labash:H3847]


As a matter of fact, the word translated “came,” is “labash” (H3847); it is only rendered “came,” in this verse, as it is predominantly found as “clothe,” “put on,” “array,” or “wear,” as these next citations reveal:


Genesis 3:21 records: “Unto Adam also and to his wife did the LORD God make coats of skins, and clothed them.” [labash:H3847]


2 Chronicles 6:41 also states: “Now therefore arise, O LORD God, into thy resting place, thou, and the ark of thy strength: let thy priests, O LORD God, be clothed [labash:H3847] with salvation, and let thy saints rejoice in goodness.”


Isaiah 4:1 speaks of the institutional churches and denominations that came under the wrath of God at the beginning of the Great Tribulation - typified by these “seven women” - who picture the 7 churches in Revelation 1 and 2. They want to be identified with Christ, yet they want their own spiritual clothing and want to eat their own spiritual bread, which leads to death and annihilation; this word is rendered, “and wear”: 


“And in that day seven women shall take hold of one man, saying, We will eat our own bread, and wear [labash:H3847] our own apparel: only let us be called by thy name, to take away our reproach.”


Gideon [Gid`own:H1439]


Back in Part 9, when we were first introduced to Gideon I  made the point that his name stems from the verb, “gada`” (H1438) signifying to “hew down” or “cut down,” hence the epithet, “hewer”; however, we did not look at some of the ways that God employs this verb, so I would like to do so now in the time we have remaining. It’s curious that his name also identifies with what he did by “throwing down” the altar of Baal, and “cutting down” the grove that was next to it, as “the angel of the LORD” instructed. Additionally, we note that his father gave him the name Jerubbaal, which means, “let Baal plead against him.” 


Psalm 107:16 extols the wonders of salvation: “For he hath broken the gates of brass, and cut [gada`:H1438] the bars of iron in sunder.” [gada`:H1438]


Isaiah 14:12 speaks of Satan’s demise: “How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning! [how] art thou cut down [gada`:H1438]

 to the ground, which didst weaken the nations!”


Lord willing, in our next study we will examine the rest of verse 34, “...and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him.” 































Judges 6 - Part 41



October 11, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 41 and today’s date is October 11, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


We are down to the latter part of verse 34, in which we learn what Gideon did next in the historical context: “... and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him.”


And He Blew [taqa`:H8628] A Trumpet [showfar:H7782]


We have considered the two terms, “and he blew” (taqa`:H8628) and “a trumpet” (showfar:H7782) back in Judges 3, when judge Ehud did the very same thing; however, it might be helpful to review the passages in which these two expressions appear together as they relate to the worldwide proclamation of the Gospel to reach “the nations of the elect,” prior to May 21, 2011.


Although the term “showfar” can be used to warn of judgment, it is also utilized in connection with joy (such as in a worshipful celebration), as a proclamation, as an alarm, or to gather the people to an assembly or on a feast day, etc.


Exodus 19:16-20 reveals: “And it came to pass on the third day in the morning, that there were thunders and lightnings, and a thick cloud upon the mount, and the voice of the trumpet [showfar:H7782] exceeding loud; so that all the people that [was] in the camp trembled. {17} And Moses brought forth the people out of the camp to meet with God; and they stood at the nether part of the mount. {18} And mount Sinai was altogether on a smoke, because the LORD descended upon it in fire: and the smoke thereof ascended as the smoke of a furnace, and the whole mount quaked greatly. {19} And when the voice of the trumpet [showfar:H7782] sounded long, and waxed louder and louder, Moses spake, and God answered him by a voice. {20} And the LORD came down upon mount Sinai, on the top of the mount: and the LORD called Moses [up] to the top of the mount; and Moses went up.”


In the New Testament, in Hebrews 12:18-21, and 25-29, we find a commentary on Exodus 19: 


“For ye are not come unto the mount that might be touched, and that burned with fire, nor unto blackness, and darkness, and tempest, {19} And the sound of a trumpet, and the voice of words; which [voice] they that heard intreated that the word should not be spoken to them any more: {20} (For they could not endure that which was commanded, And if so much as a beast touch the mountain, it shall be stoned, or thrust through with a dart: {21} And so terrible was the sight, [that] Moses said, I exceedingly fear and quake:) ... {25} See that ye refuse not him that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth, much more [shall not] we [escape], if we turn away from him that [speaketh] from heaven: {26} Whose voice then shook the earth: but now he hath promised, saying, Yet once more I shake not the earth only, but also heaven. {27} And this [word], Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain. {28} Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear: {29} For our God [is] a consuming fire”


On the other hand, Joshua 6:4, 8-9, 13, 16, and 20 recount how God allowed the Israelites to conquer Jericho, in which we find the terms “blow” (taqa:H8628) and “ram’s horns” (showfar:H7782) together; keep in mind that the 13 times in which they encircled the wall of the city points to the 13,000th anniversary of Creation in 1988, which was the year in which the final Great Tribulation of our day on May 21, 1988 commenced: 


“And seven priests shall bear before the ark seven trumpets [showfar:H7782] of rams' horns: and the seventh day ye shall compass the city seven times, and the priests shall blow [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets. [showfar:H7782] ... {8} And it came to pass, when Joshua had spoken unto the people, that the seven priests bearing the seven trumpets [showfar:H7782] of rams' horns passed on before the LORD, and blew [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets [showfar:H7782]: and the ark of the covenant of the LORD followed them. {9} And the armed men went before the priests that blew [taqa`:H8628] [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets [showfar:H7782], and the rereward came after the ark, [the priests] going on, and blowing [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets. [showfar:H7782] ... {13} And seven priests bearing seven trumpets [showfar:H7782] of rams' horns before the ark of the LORD went on continually, and blew [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets [showfar:H7782]: and the armed men went before them; but the rereward came after the ark of the LORD, [the priests] going on, and blowing [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets. [showfar:H7782]  ... {16} And it came to pass at the seventh time, when the priests blew [taqa`:H8628]  with the trumpets, [showfar:H7782] Joshua said unto the people, Shout; for the LORD hath given you the city. ... {20} So the people shouted when [the priests] blew [taqa`:H8628] with the trumpets [showfar:H7782]:and it came to pass, when the people heard the sound of the trumpet [showfar:H7782], and the people shouted with a great shout, that the wall fell down flat, so that the people went up into the city, every man straight before him, and they took the city.”


We also find these two words in the very next chapter namely, Judges 7:18-20, and 22, which is another historical parable relating to the Great Tribulation: When I blow [taqa`:H8628] with a trumpet [showfar:H7782], I and all that [are] with me, then blow [taqa`:H8628] ye the trumpets [showfar:H7782] also on every side of all the camp, and say, [The sword] of the LORD, and of Gideon. {19} So Gideon, and the hundred men that [were] with him, came unto the outside of the camp in the beginning of the middle watch; and they had but newly set the watch: and they blew [taqa`:H8628] the trumpets [showfar:H7782], and brake the pitchers that [were] in their hands. {20} And the three companies blew [taqa`:H8628] the trumpets [showfar:H7782], and brake the pitchers, and held the lamps in their left hands, and the trumpets [showfar:H7782] in their right hands to blow [taqa`:H8628]  [withal]: and they cried, The sword of the LORD, and of Gideon. ... {22} And the three hundred blew [taqa`:H8628] the trumpets [showfar:H7782], and the LORD set every man's sword against his fellow, even throughout all the host: and the host fled to Bethshittah in Zererath, [and] to the border of Abelmeholah, unto Tabbath.”


Abiezer [’Abiy`ezer:H44]


“Abiezer” is the next word that we encounter in verse 34, and it is actually the root word for “Abizerite” (’Abiy ha-`Ezriy:H33) that we saw earlier in Judges 6, verse 11 and 24 (and we will run across it again once we get to Judges 8:32, Lord willing.) In Judges 6 - Part 9 I mentioned that H33 means, “my father is help,” without explaining why since I knew we would eventually arrive at verse 34. 

H44 is a compound word, made up the word “father” (’ab:H1) - consisting of the first two letters of the Hebrew alphabet: the “aleph” and the “bet” - corresponding to our English “a-b” or in the Greek, “alpha” and “beta.” You might recall the epithet by which the Lord Jesus tenderly referred to His beloved Father - “abba” (G5) in the New Testament, which stems from “ ’ab” (H1) in Hebrew. The other term is “ `Ezer” (H5829), which is a Hebrew name, and identically spelled to 

“ `ezer” (H5828), which is primarily translated as “help,” as the following verses declare:


For instance, it appears in the first two verses of  Psalm 121:1-2, as “my help”: “ [A Song of degrees.] I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help. [`ezer:H5828] {2} My help [`ezer:H5828]  [cometh] from the LORD, which made heaven and earth.”


Psalm 146:5 joyfully proclaims: “Happy [is he] that [hath] the God of Jacob for his help [`ezer:H5828], whose hope [is] in the LORD his God:”


Was Gathered [za`aq:H2199] After [’achar:H310] Him


The last two expressions in verse 34 are: “was gathered” and “after,” in three other verses, including the very next one in verse 35,


Judges 6:35 reveals: “And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered [za`aq:H2199] after [’achar:H310] him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them.”


The other two references are found in Joshua 8:16 and 1 Samuel 15:11 respectively: 


In verse 16 of Joshua 8:16-19,  these two terms emerge as “were called” and “after” in which God instructed Joshua to set up an ambush to lure the army of Ai outside of the city.  God also promised him victory over the city of Ai, after their initial defeat as a result of the sin of Achan: “And all the people that [were] in Ai were called [za`aq:H2199] together to pursue after [’achar:H310] them: and they pursued after Joshua, and were drawn away from the city. {17} And there was not a man left in Ai or Bethel, that went not out after Israel: and they left the city open, and pursued after Israel. {18} And the LORD said unto Joshua, Stretch out the spear that [is] in thy hand toward Ai; for I will give it into thine hand. And Joshua stretched out the spear that [he had] in his hand toward the city. {19} And the ambush arose quickly out of their place, and they ran as soon as he had stretched out his hand: and they entered into the city, and took it, and hasted and set the city on fire.”


In verse 11 of 1 Samuel 15:10-11, the Scriptures underscore that king Saul did not wholly follow God’s commands, for which Samuel grieved all night; these terms are rendered as “and he cried” and “from following”: “Then came the word of the LORD unto Samuel, saying,{11} It repenteth me that I have set up Saul [to be] king: for he is turned back from following [’achar:H310] me, and hath not performed my commandments. And it grieved Samuel; and he cried [za`aq:H2199] unto the LORD all night.”


Let’s proceed on to verse 35, and we’ll take a look at the other phrases in this verse: “And he sent [za`aq:H2199] messengers [mal’ak:H4397]  throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered [za`aq:H2199] after [’achar:H310] him: and he sent [za`aq:H2199] messengers [mal’ak:H4397] unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them.”


And He Sent [shalach:H7971] Messengers [mal’ak:H4397]


These first two words, “And he sent” and “messengers” occur twice in verse 35, but we have also considered them earlier in Judges 6 - in verse 21 -  in which they surface as, “Then the angel” and “put forth”:


Then the angel [mal’ak:H4397] of the LORD put forth [za`aq:H2199]  the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock, and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight.”


We have already researched the other tribes that are mentioned - Manasseh - which is the tribe that Gideon is from, along with Asher, Zebulun, and Naphtali in some of our previous studies. So that bring us to the last phrase in verse 35,


And They Came Up [`alah:H5927] To Meet Them [qir’ah:H7125]


These two terms emerge in 13 other passages, and we will look at a few of them:


Genesis 46:29 records, “And Joseph made ready his chariot, and went up [`alah:H5927] to meet [qir’ah:H7125]  Israel his father, to Goshen, and presented himself unto him; and he fell on his neck, and wept on his neck a good while.”


In Judges 11:31 we find this account regarding Jephthah’s vow that he had made to the LORD, which is another historical parable:“Then it shall be, that whatsoever cometh forth of the doors of my house to meet [qir’ah:H7125]  me, when I return in peace from the children of Ammon, shall surely be the LORD'S, and I will offer it up [`alah:H5927]  for a burnt offering.”


This is also the case in Judges 20:31 which has to do the battle between the tribe of Benjamin and the other tribes, as a result of the incident regarding the abuse of the Levite’s concubine in Judges 18, which typifies the “end of the church age”: “And the children of Benjamin went out against [qir’ah:H7125] the people, [and] were drawn away from the city; and they began to smite of the people, [and] kill, as at other times, in the highways, of which one goeth up [`alah:H5927] to the house of God, and the other to Gibeah in the field, about thirty men of Israel.”


We’re going to have to stop here. Lord willing, we will pick up with verse 36 in our next study.













 




Judges 6 - Part 42

October 14, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 42 and today’s date is October 14, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


We are down to verse 36 and the last five verses in Judges 6: “And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, “


We have already discussed the words and phrases in verse 36, so let’s move on to verse 37, in which Gideon asks the Lord for a “sign” that the Lord would indeed, “save Israel by mine hand” which is a phrase that is also repeated in verse 37.


Verse 37: “Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said.” 


Behold I Will Put [yatsag:G3322]


There are many Hebrew words that are translated as “put,” which in verse 37 is rendered as “Behold I will put,” as Gideon sets out to “prove” God as it were. The following passages illustrate how God incorporates this term, which is primarily expressed as “set” or “made.” 


The only other time that this particular expression surfaces again is in Judges 7:5 which is a continuation of this historical parable, and in Judges 8:27, which is a curious verse regarding an “ephod” that Gideon had made, which we can discuss further once we get to Chapter 8, Lord willing; the former is expressed as “him shalt thou set,” and the latter as,“and put”: 


“So he brought down the people unto the water: and the LORD said unto Gideon, Every one that lappeth of the water with his tongue, as a dog lappeth, him shalt thou set  [yatsag:G3322] by himself; likewise every one that boweth down upon his knees to drink.”


“And Gideon made an ephod thereof, and put  [yatsag:G3322]

 it in his city, [even] in Ophrah: and all Israel went thither a whoring after it: which thing became a snare unto Gideon, and to his house.”


In verse 6 of  Job 17:6-16 this word surfaces as, “He hath made” speaking of the Lord Jesus under the wrath of God, at “... the foundation of the world”: “He hath made [yatsag:G3322] me also a byword of the people; and aforetime I was as a tabret. I am a spitting [topheth:H8611] to the faces. [Green’s Literal Version] {7} Mine eye also is dim by reason of sorrow, and all my members [are] as a shadow. {8 Upright [men] shall be astonied at this, and the innocent shall stir up himself against the hypocrite. {9} The righteous also shall hold on his way, and he that hath clean hands shall be stronger and stronger. {10} But as for you all, do ye return, and come now: for I cannot find [one] wise [man] among you. {11} My days are past, my purposes are broken off, [even] the thoughts of my heart. {12} They change the night into day: the light [is] short because of darkness. {13} If I wait, the grave [is] mine house: I have made my bed in the darkness. {14} I have said to corruption, Thou [art] my father: to the worm, [Thou art] my mother, and my sister. {15} And where [is] now my hope? as for my hope, who shall see it? {16} They shall go down to the bars of the pit, when [our] rest together [is] in the dust.”


Fleece [gazzah:H1492]


The next term in verse 37 is “fleece” which is only found in each of the last four verses in this chapter: 37-40,


“Behold, I will put a fleece [gazzah:H1492] of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece [gazzah:H1492] only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece [gazzah:H1492] together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece [gazzah:H1492], a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece [gazzah:H1492]; let it now be dry only upon the fleece [gazzah:H1492], and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece [gazzah:H1492] only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


Please note that this word, “a fleece” is derived from a root word, which is the verb “gazaz” (H1494), and found in two highly significant references - Job 1:20 and Isaiah 53:7 respectively:


I’ll read Job 1:20-22, in which this word is rendered as “and shaved,” as it is primarily translated as “shear”: “Then Job arose, and rent his mantle, and shaved [gazaz:H1494] his head, and fell down upon the ground, and worshipped, {21} And said, Naked came I out of my mother's womb, and naked shall I return thither: the LORD gave, and the LORD hath taken away; blessed be the name of the LORD. {22} In all this Job sinned not, nor charged God foolishly.”


In verse 7 of Isaiah 53:1-12, this term is expressed as “her shearers,” in yet another spiritual portrait of Christ under the wrath of God, at “...the foundation of the world”: 


“Who hath believed our report? and to whom is the arm of the LORD revealed? {2} For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, [there is] no beauty that we should desire him. {3} He is despised and rejected of men; a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief: and we hid as it were [our] faces from him; he was despised, and we esteemed him not. {4} Surely he hath borne our griefs, and carried our sorrows: yet we did esteem him stricken, smitten of God, and afflicted. {5} But he [was] wounded for our transgressions, [he was] bruised for our iniquities: the chastisement of our peace [was] upon him; and with his stripes we are healed. {6} All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned every one to his own way; and the LORD hath laid on him the iniquity of us all. {7} He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth: he is brought as a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers [gazaz:H1494] is dumb [i.e., “silent], so he openeth not his mouth. {8} He was taken from prison and from judgment: and who shall declare his generation? for he was cut off out of the land of the living: for the transgression of my people was he stricken. {9} And he made his grave with the wicked, and with the rich in his death; because he had done no violence, neither [was any] deceit in his mouth. {10} Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he hath put [him] to grief: when thou shalt make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see [his] seed, he shall prolong [his] days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. {11} He shall see of the travail of his soul, [and] shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities. {12} Therefore will I divide him [a portion] with the great, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong; because he hath poured out his soul unto death: and he was numbered with the transgressors; and he bare the sin of many, and made intercession for the transgressors.”


So when we see this word “fleece” we need to think of  “sheep” - and specifically “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world,” (according to Revelation 13:8), and very appropriately also brings us to our next word,


Of Wool [tsemer:H6785]


And what do we think of, when we think of wool? Sheep again. And more than that - sacrifice, as this term is also found, among other places, in Isaiah 1:18, as “they shall be as wool”:


“Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet [shaniy:H8144], they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, [towla`:H8438] they shall be as wool.” [tsemer:H6785]


Incidentally, both of these terms, “scarlet” and “crimson” were featured prominently in the Tabernacle furnishings, and in various sacrifices. Moreover, “towla`” (H8438) is rendered in the following citations as “worm,” as the Lord Jesus became “a worm” spiritually in the Atonement, at the “foundation”:


Job 25:6 states: “How much less man, [that is] a worm? and the son of man, [which is] a worm?” [towla`:H8438]


Psalm 22:6 also adds: But I [am] a worm [towla`:H8438], and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people.”

Do you recall where Gideon “put” the fleece? This is our next word, “in the floor,” signifying the “threshingfloor,” which was utilized for separating the “wheat” from the “chaff.” 


In The Floor [goren:H1637]


One of the most important passages regarding a “threshingfloor,” is found in verses 1 Chronicles 21:14-28, which is replete with astounding spiritual history: David built an altar and made sacrifice, which was the same location in which Abraham sacrificed Isaac, where the foundation of the Temple was laid, and where Christ hung on the Cross:


“So the LORD sent pestilence upon Israel: and there fell of Israel seventy thousand men. {15} And God sent an angel unto Jerusalem to destroy it: and as he was destroying, the LORD beheld, and he repented him of the evil, and said to the angel that destroyed, It is enough, stay now thine hand. And the angel of the LORD stood by the threshingfloor of Ornan the Jebusite. {16} And David lifted up his eyes, and saw the angel of the LORD stand between the earth and the heaven, having a drawn sword in his hand stretched out over Jerusalem. Then David and the elders [of Israel, who were] clothed in sackcloth, fell upon their faces. {17} And David said unto God, [Is it] not I [that] commanded the people to be numbered? even I it is that have sinned and done evil indeed; but [as for] these sheep, what have they done? let thine hand, I pray thee, O LORD my God, be on me, and on my father's house; but not on thy people, that they should be plagued. {18} Then the angel of the LORD commanded Gad to say to David, that David should go up, and set up an altar unto the LORD in the threshingfloor of Ornan the Jebusite. {19} And David went up at the saying of Gad, which he spake in the name of the LORD. {20} And Ornan turned back, and saw the angel; and his four sons with him hid themselves. Now Ornan was threshing wheat. {21} And as David came to Ornan, Ornan looked and saw David, and went out of the threshingfloor, and bowed himself to David with [his] face to the ground. {22} Then David said to Ornan, Grant me the place of [this] threshingfloor, that I may build an altar therein unto the LORD: thou shalt grant it me for the full price: that the plague may be stayed from the people. {23} And Ornan said unto David, Take [it] to thee, and let my lord the king do [that which is] good in his eyes: lo, I give [thee] the oxen [also] for burnt offerings, and the threshing instruments for wood, and the wheat for the meat offering; I give it all. {24} And king David said to Ornan, Nay; but I will verily buy it for the full price: for I will not take [that] which [is] thine for the LORD, nor offer burnt offerings without cost. {25} So David gave to Ornan for the place six hundred shekels of gold by weight. {26} And David built there an altar unto the LORD, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings, and called upon the LORD; and he answered him from heaven by fire upon the altar of burnt offering. {27} And the LORD commanded the angel; and he put up his sword again into the sheath thereof. {28} At that time when David saw that the LORD had answered him in the threshingfloor of Ornan the Jebusite, then he sacrificed there.”


Let’s stop here, and Lord willing, we will continue our examination of the rest of verses 37 in our next study.





  









Judges 6 - Part 43

October 18, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 43 and today’s date is October 18, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


In our last study, we left off at the latter part of verse 37: “...[and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said.”


And If The Dew [tal:H2919]


Let’s consider the term, “and if the dew,” as it is used in conjunction with the “fleece” in each of verses 37-40, as I mentioned in our previous study. 


Do you recall what the “fleece of wool”  represented spiritually?  


It points to the atonement of the Lord Jesus Christ as the “...Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” (Revelation 13:8) Here are some of the ways that God utilizes this word, “dew”:


From time to time one discovers “definition” verses in the Bible which are very helpful indeed. A case in point is found in verse 2 of Deuteronomy 32:1-4, with regard to this term, “as the dew”:


“Give ear, O ye heavens, and I will speak; and hear, O earth, the words of my mouth. {2} My doctrine shall drop as the rain, my speech shall distil as the dew [tal:H2919], as the small rain upon the tender herb, and as the showers upon the grass: {3} Because I will publish the name of the LORD: ascribe ye greatness unto our God. {4} [He is] the Rock, his work [is] perfect: for all his ways [are] judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right [is] he.”


Please note the four-fold emphasis (typifying “universality” or the four points of the compass) on “water” - “as the rain,” “as the dew,” “as the small rain,” along with “and as the showers.” Additionally there are three words that highlight the Word of God: “the words of my mouth,” “my doctrine,” and “my speech.” We see that God is very definitely linking “dew” with “doctrine,” and thus with the entire Bible, as 2 Timothy 3:16 clearly reminds us:


“All scripture [is] given by inspiration of God, and [is] profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness:”


God makes a similar connection in verse 14 of Exodus 16:14-15 with regard to the  “manna” and the “dew”: “And when the dew [tal:H2919] that lay was gone up, behold, upon the face of the wilderness [there lay] a small round thing, [as] small as the hoar frost on the ground. {15} And when the children of Israel saw [it], they said one to another, It [is] manna: for they wist not what it [was]. And Moses said unto them, This [is] the bread which the LORD hath given you to eat.


Notice, if you will that the “manna” is not only associated with “dew” or “the Water of Life,” but also with “the Bread of Life.” John 6:31-58 provides an important commentary on the “Bread” or “Manna,” which He relates symbolically to His “flesh” and “blood”:


“Our fathers did eat manna in the desert; as it is written, He gave them bread from heaven to eat. {32} Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Moses gave you not that bread from heaven; but my Father giveth you the true bread from heaven. {33} For the bread of God is he which cometh down from heaven, and giveth life unto the world. {34} Then said they unto him, Lord, evermore give us this bread. {35} And Jesus said unto them, I am the bread of life: he that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst. {36} But I said unto you, That ye also have seen me, and believe not. {37} All that the Father giveth me shall come to me; and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out. {38} For I came down from heaven, not to do mine own will, but the will of him that sent me. {39} And this is the Father's will which hath sent me, that of all which he hath given me I should lose nothing, but should raise it up again at the last day. {40} And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day. {41} The Jews then murmured at him, because he said, I am the bread which came down from heaven. {42} And they said, Is not this Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know? how is it then that he saith, I came down from heaven? {43} Jesus therefore answered and said unto them, Murmur not among yourselves. {44} No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him: and I will raise him up at the last day. {45} It is written in the prophets, And they shall be all taught of God. Every man therefore that hath heard, and hath learned of the Father, cometh unto me. {46} Not that any man hath seen the Father, save he which is of God, he hath seen the Father. {47} Verily, verily, I say unto you, He that believeth on me hath everlasting life. {48} I am that bread of life. {49} Your fathers did eat manna in the wilderness, and are dead. {50} This is the bread which cometh down from heaven, that a man may eat thereof, and not die. {51} I am the living bread which came down from heaven: if any man eat of this bread, he shall live for ever: and the bread that I will give is my flesh, which I will give for the life of the world. {52} The Jews therefore strove among themselves, saying, How can this man give us [his] flesh to eat? {53} Then Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except ye eat the flesh of the Son of man, and drink his blood, ye have no life in you. {54} Whoso eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, hath eternal life; and I will raise him up at the last day. {55} For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed. {56} He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him. {57} As the living Father hath sent me, and I live by the Father: so he that eateth me, even he shall live by me. {58} This is that bread which came down from heaven: not as your fathers did eat manna, and are dead: he that eateth of this bread shall live for ever.


The following citations further illustrate God’s usage of this term, “and if the dew”:


 In Job chapters 38-41 God relentlessly pursues a line of questioning with Job, and in Job 38:28, this particular question includes our word, “dew”:   “Hath the rain a father? or who hath begotten the drops of dew?” [tal:H2919] 


Psalm 110:3 this word surfaces again as, thou hast the dew : “Thy people [shall be] willing in the day of thy power, in the beauties of holiness from the womb of the morning: thou hast the dew [tal:H2919] of thy youth.”


Psalm 133:3  contains the term for “dew” as well; keep in mind that this is another “definition” verse regarding “the blessing,” which spiritually typifies, “life for evermore”: “As the dew [tal:H2919] of Hermon, [and as the dew] that descended upon the mountains of Zion: for there the LORD commanded the blessing, [even] life for evermore.


Proverbs 19:12 is a verse that encapsulates both God’s grace along with God’s wrath: “The king's wrath [is] as the roaring of a lion; but his favour [is] as dew [tal:H2919] upon the grass.”


Song of Solomon 5:2 uniquely associates “dew” with Christ’s “head” and “locks”: “I sleep, but my heart waketh: [it is] the voice of my beloved that knocketh, [saying], Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew [tal:H2919] , [and] my locks with the drops of the night.”


In Zechariah 8:12, God presents this wonderful promise to His elect remnant: “For the seed [shall be] prosperous; the vine shall give her fruit, and the ground shall give her increase, and the heavens shall give their dew; [tal:H2919] and I will cause the remnant of this people to possess all these [things].”


And It Be Dry [choreb:H2721] Upon All The Earth [’erets:H776]


The next phrase that we want to turn our attention to is, “...and [it be] dry upon all the earth…” which consists of two words, which only appear together in three other references, besides Judges 6:37-40.



The first one is in verse 38 of Jeremiah 50:35-46, which chronicles the fall of Babylon, in which these words are translated as, “A drought” and “for it [is] the land”:


A sword  [chereb:H2719] [is] upon the Chaldeans, saith the LORD, and upon the inhabitants of Babylon, and upon her princes, and upon her wise [men]. {36} A sword  [chereb:H2719]  [is] upon the liars; and they shall dote: a sword [is] upon her mighty men; and they shall be dismayed. {37} A sword [chereb:H2719] [is] upon their horses, and upon their chariots, and upon all the mingled people that [are] in the midst of her; and they shall become as women: a sword [is] upon her treasures; and they shall be robbed. {38} A drought [choreb:H2721] [is] upon her waters; and they shall be dried up: for it [is] the land [’erets:H776] of graven images, and they are mad upon [their] idols. {39} Therefore the wild beasts of the desert with the wild beasts of the islands shall dwell [there], and the owls shall dwell therein: and it shall be no more inhabited for ever; neither shall it be dwelt in from generation to generation. {40} As God overthrew Sodom and Gomorrah and the neighbour [cities] thereof, saith the LORD; [so] shall no man abide there, neither shall any son of man dwell therein. {41} Behold, a people shall come from the north, and a great nation, and many kings shall be raised up from the coasts of the earth. {42} They shall hold the bow and the lance: they [are] cruel, and will not shew mercy: their voice shall roar like the sea, and they shall ride upon horses, [every one] put in array, like a man to the battle, against thee, O daughter of Babylon. {43} The king of Babylon hath heard the report of them, and his hands waxed feeble: anguish took hold of him, [and] pangs as of a woman in travail. {44} Behold, he shall come up like a lion from the swelling of Jordan unto the habitation of the strong: but I will make them suddenly run away from her: and who [is] a chosen [man, that] I may appoint over her? for who [is] like me? and who will appoint me the time? and who [is] that shepherd that will stand before me? {45} Therefore hear ye the counsel of the LORD, that he hath taken against Babylon; and his purposes, that he hath purposed against the land of the Chaldeans: Surely the least of the flock shall draw them out: surely he shall make [their] habitation desolate with them. {46} At the noise of the taking of Babylon the earth is moved, and the cry is heard among the nations.”


I would like to point out something interesting with regard to the word, “a drought.”  Its identically spelled root word, “chereb” (H2719) is the very first word, rendered as “sword” in verses 35, 36, and 37 of Jeremiah 50; in fact it is rendered as “sword” over 400 times in the Old Testament. In turn, it too stems from an identically spelled root word which is “charab” (H2717), that is primarily translated as “waste,” “dry,” and “dry up.” 


Why is God associating “a drought” with a “sword,” as well as “waste”?


The reason for this is that spiritually “ a drought” is a judgment from God, and hence typified by a “sword,” which leads to “waste” or “destruction.” Jeremiah 50 highlights God’s judgment against Babylon and its king, Nebuchadrezzar (who exemplifies Satan), which God used as His “battleax” to bring judgment on Judah (representing the end-time institutional churches and denominations, worldwide and without exception, that God allowed Satan to infiltrate and rule there during the “time and season” of the Great Tribulation.) However, at the end of the Great Tribulation, and commencing on the first day of the “day of judgment” - May 21, 2011 - Satan was defeated by the Lord Jesus Christ, in the same manner that Babylon was defeated by Cyrus (or Darius) the Medo-Persian ruler (who is a type of the Lord Jesus Christ). The same exact sequence of events happened to the Assyrians 100 years earlier in 709 BC, whom God used to overthrow the northern kingdom of Samaria (the “ten tribes”).


The other two passages in which these two words, “and it be dry” (choreb:H2721) and “upon all the earth” (’erets:H776) are found are Ezekiel 29:10 and Haggai 1:11, respectively:


Ezekiel 29:10 declares God’s judgment upon Egypt, which spiritually pictures slavery to sin and to Satan; these terms are expressed as “the land” and “waste”: “Behold, therefore I [am] against thee, and against thy rivers, and I will make the land [’erets:H776] of Egypt utterly [choreb:H2721]  waste [chorbah:H2723] [and] desolate [shemamah:H8077], from the tower of Syene even unto the border of Ethiopia.”


Incidentally, there is another word in this verse - “waste” (chorbah:H2723) - which stems from “utterly,” (choreb:H2721) and is generally translated as “waste” or “desolation.” Additionally, the very next expression in this verse is “and desolate,” which is an altogether different Hebrew word, (shemamah:H8077), nevertheless the thrust of this word is just like the other two, so God is really driving home the point regarding the extent of His retribution on Egypt.


In verse 11 of Haggai 1:1-12 we learn of God’s sentiment toward Israel for neglecting His house, for which He chastised them; wonderfully, starting in verse 12, the rest of the chapter recounts what they did to faithfully carry out God’s directive, under the leadership of Haggai the prophet, Zerubbabel the governor of Judah, and Joshua the high priest: 


“In the second year of Darius the king, in the sixth month, in the first day of the month, came the word of the LORD by Haggai the prophet unto Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, and to Joshua the son of Josedech, the high priest, saying, {2} Thus speaketh the LORD of hosts, saying, This people say, The time is not come, the time that the LORD'S house should be built. {3} Then came the word of the LORD by Haggai the prophet, saying, {4} [Is it] time for you, O ye, to dwell in your cieled houses, and this house [lie] waste? {5} Now therefore thus saith the LORD of hosts; Consider your ways. {6} Ye have sown much, and bring in little; ye eat, but ye have not enough; ye drink, but ye are not filled with drink; ye clothe you, but there is none warm; and he that earneth wages earneth wages [to put it] into a bag with holes. {7} Thus saith the LORD of hosts; Consider your ways. {8} Go up to the mountain, and bring wood, and build the house; and I will take pleasure in it, and I will be glorified, saith the LORD. {9} Ye looked for much, and, lo, [it came] to little; and when ye brought [it] home, I did blow upon it. Why? saith the LORD of hosts. Because of mine house that [is] waste, and ye run every man unto his own house. {10} Therefore the heaven over you is stayed from dew, and the earth is stayed [from] her fruit. {11} And I called for a drought [choreb:H2721]upon the land [’erets:H776], and upon the mountains, and upon the corn, and upon the new wine, and upon the oil, and upon [that] which the ground bringeth forth, and upon men, and upon cattle, and upon all the labour of the hands. {12} Then Zerubbabel the son of Shealtiel, and Joshua the son of Josedech, the high priest, with all the remnant of the people, obeyed the voice of the LORD their God, and the words of Haggai the prophet, as the LORD their God had sent him, and the people did fear before the LORD.”


Lord willing we will resume our examination of verse 37 in our next study.




 




 







Judges 6 - Part 44

October 21, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 44 and today’s date is October 21, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


We have arrived at the latter half of verse 37, and the phrase, ...then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said.”


However, we have already considered these words in some of our earlier lessons, so let's proceed to verse 38, which declares:


Verse 38: “And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water.” 


And It Was So: For He Rose Up Early [shakam:H7925] On The Morrow [mochorath:H4283] 


The first phrase in this verse, “And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow,” is made up of two words that appear in the following four passages:


Verse 6 of Exodus 32:1-8 reveals Israel’s quick departure into Egyptian idolatry; truly they had left Egypt physically, yet Egypt had not left the majority of them spiritually: 


“And when the people saw that Moses delayed to come down out of the mount, the people gathered themselves together unto Aaron, and said unto him, Up, make us gods, which shall go before us; for [as for] this Moses, the man that brought us up out of the land of Egypt, we wot not what is become of him. {2} And Aaron said unto them, Break off the golden earrings, which [are] in the ears of your wives, of your sons, and of your daughters, and bring [them] unto me. {3} And all the people brake off the golden earrings which [were] in their ears, and brought [them] unto Aaron. {4} And he received [them] at their hand, and fashioned it with a graving tool, after he had made it a molten calf: and they said, These [be] thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt. {5} And when Aaron saw [it], he built an altar before it; and Aaron made proclamation, and said, To morrow [is] a feast to the LORD. {6} And they rose up early [shakam:H7925] on the morrow [mochorath:H4283], and offered burnt offerings, and brought peace offerings; and the people sat down to eat and to drink, and rose up to play. {7} And the LORD said unto Moses, Go, get thee down; for thy people, which thou broughtest out of the land of Egypt, have corrupted [themselves]: {8} They have turned aside quickly out of the way which I commanded them: they have made them a molten calf, and have worshipped it, and have sacrificed thereunto, and said, These [be] thy gods, O Israel, which have brought thee up out of the land of Egypt.”


Verse 4 of Judges 21:1-7 chronicles what Israel decided to do with regard to providing wives for the tribe of Benjamin, following the great slaughter that took place between Benjamin and all the other tribes over the matter of the Levite’s concubine that had been abused in Gibeah in Judges 18: 


“Now the men of Israel had sworn in Mizpeh, saying, There shall not any of us give his daughter unto Benjamin to wife. {2} And the people came to the house of God, and abode there till even before God, and lifted up their voices, and wept sore; {3} And said, O LORD God of Israel, why is this come to pass in Israel, that there should be to day one tribe lacking in Israel? {4} And it came to pass on the morrow [mochorath:H4283], that the people rose early [shakam:H7925], and built there an altar, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings. {5} And the children of Israel said, Who [is there] among all the tribes of Israel that came not up with the congregation unto the LORD? For they had made a great oath concerning him that came not up to the LORD to Mizpeh, saying, He shall surely be put to death. {6} And the children of Israel repented them for Benjamin their brother, and said, There is one tribe cut off from Israel this day. {7} How shall we do for wives for them that remain, seeing we have sworn by the LORD that we will not give them of our daughters to wives?”



Verses 3 and 4 in 1 Samuel 5:1-5 record what happened when the Philistines placed the Ark of the Covenant in the temple of the false god, Dagon: “And the Philistines took the ark of God, and brought it from Ebenezer unto Ashdod. {2} When the Philistines took the ark of God, they brought it into the house of Dagon, and set it by Dagon. {3} And when they of Ashdod arose early [shakam:H7925] on the morrow  [mochorath:H4283], behold, Dagon [was] fallen upon his face to the earth before the ark of the LORD. And they took Dagon, and set him in his place again. {4} And when they arose early [shakam:H7925] on the morrow  [mochorath:H4283] morning, behold, Dagon [was] fallen upon his face to the ground before the ark of the LORD; and the head of Dagon and both the palms of his hands [were] cut off upon the threshold; only [the stump of] Dagon was left to him. {5} Therefore neither the priests of Dagon, nor any that come into Dagon's house, tread on the threshold of Dagon in Ashdod unto this day.”


And Thrust [zuwr:H2115] The Fleece Together [zuwr:H2115]


Next we learn that Gideon “thrust together” the fleece. Do you recall Who the fleece represents? It is the Lord Jesus Christ, as “...the Lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” And we will be able to further substantiate this conclusion by this expression, “and thrust together,” along with the next one, “and wringed.” H2115 is found in two other citations:


In verse 15 of Job 39:13-17, this term is expressed as, “may crush them”: “[Gavest thou] the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich? {14} Which leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in dust, {15} And forgetteth that the foot may crush them [zuwr:H2115], or that the wild beast may break them. {16} She is hardened against her young ones, as though [they were] not hers: her labour is in vain without fear; {17} Because God hath deprived her of wisdom, neither hath he imparted to her understanding.


Verse 6 of Isaiah 1:1-6, translates this word as, “they have not been closed” concerning these “open wounds” which represent the ravages of sin, with regard to Israel’s rebellion: “The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, [and] Hezekiah, kings of Judah. {2] Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. {3} The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib: [but] Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. {4} Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, a seed of evildoers, children that are corrupters: they have forsaken the LORD, they have provoked the Holy One of Israel unto anger, they are gone away backward. {5} Why should ye be stricken any more? ye will revolt more and more: the whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint. {6} From the sole of the foot even unto the head [there is] no soundness in it; [but] wounds, and bruises, and putrifying sores: they have not been closed [zuwr:H2115], neither bound up, neither mollified with ointment.”


These two terms, “and thrust together,” and “may crush” relate to Christ being under the curse of God in the Atonement, in which he was “torn apart,” “poured out” and “melted” by the fire of God’s wrath. The language, “they have not been closed” refers to the “open wounds,” which typify sin, which is what Christ became totally identified with, in order to make the payment that God’s Justice demanded, which is death and annihilation. Let’s consider the next word, “and wringed” which is what Gideon did to the fleece historically, in order to produce the “bowl of water.” 


And Wringed [matsah:H4680]


H4680 surfaces in 6 other references:


Leviticus chapter 1 details information that God gave concerning various animal sacrifices. This term emerges in verse 15 of verses 14-17, which have to do with offering pigeons or doves: 


“And if the burnt sacrifice for his offering to the LORD [be] of fowls, then he shall bring his offering of turtledoves, or of young pigeons. {15} And the priest shall bring it unto the altar, and wring off his head, and burn [it] on the altar; and the blood thereof shall be wrung out [matsah:H4680] at the side of the altar: {16} And he shall pluck away his crop with his feathers, and cast it beside the altar on the east part, by the place of the ashes: {17} And he shall cleave it with the wings thereof, [but] shall not divide [it] asunder: and the priest shall burn it upon the altar, upon the wood that [is] upon the fire: it [is] a burnt sacrifice, an offering made by fire, of a sweet savour unto the LORD.”




Similarly verse 9 of Leviticus 5:7-10 also includes a sacrifice of two turtledoves or two pigeons: “And if he be not able to bring a lamb, then he shall bring for his trespass, which he hath committed, two turtledoves, or two young pigeons, unto the LORD; one for a sin offering, and the other for a burnt offering. {8} And he shall bring them unto the priest, who shall offer [that] which [is] for the sin offering first, and wring off his head from his neck, but shall not divide [it] asunder: {9}And he shall sprinkle of the blood of the sin offering upon the side of the altar; and the rest of the blood shall be wrung out [matsah:H4680] at the bottom of the altar: it [is] a sin offering. {10} And he shall offer the second [for] a burnt offering, according to the manner: and the priest shall make an atonement for him for his sin which he hath sinned, and it shall be forgiven him.”


Verse 10 of Psalm 73:1-10 is a commentary of the “wicked” or non-elect, in which this word is rendered, “are wrung out”: “[A Psalm of Asaph.] Truly God [is] good to Israel, [even] to such as are of a clean heart. {2} But as for me, my feet were almost gone; my steps had well nigh slipped. {3} For I was envious at the foolish, [when] I saw the prosperity of the wicked. {4} For [there are] no bands in their death: but their strength [is] firm. {5} They [are] not in trouble [as other] men; neither are they plagued like [other] men. {6} Therefore pride compasseth them about as a chain; violence covereth them [as] a garment. {7} Their eyes stand out with fatness: they have more than heart could wish. {8} They are corrupt, and speak wickedly [concerning] oppression: they speak loftily. {9} They set their mouth against the heavens, and their tongue walketh through the earth. {10} Therefore his people return hither: and waters of a full [cup] are wrung out [matsah:H4680]  to them.”


Likewise verse 8 of Psalm 75:7-10 acknowledges: “But God [is] the judge: he putteth down one, and setteth up another. {8} For in the hand of the LORD [there is] a cup, and the wine is red; it is full of mixture; and he poureth out of the same: but the dregs thereof, all the wicked of the earth shall wring [them] out [matsah:H4680], [and] drink [them]. {9} But I will declare for ever; I will sing praises to the God of Jacob. {10} All the horns of the wicked also will I cut off; [but] the horns of the righteous shall be exalted.”


Verse 17 Isaiah 51:17-23 also maintains: “Awake, awake, stand up, O Jerusalem, which hast drunk at the hand of the LORD the cup of his fury; thou hast drunken the dregs of the cup of trembling, [and] wrung [them] out. {18} [There is] none to guide her among all the sons [whom] she hath brought forth; neither [is there any] that taketh her by the hand of all the sons [that] she hath brought up. {19] These two [things] are come unto thee; who shall be sorry for thee? desolation, and destruction, and the famine, and the sword: by whom shall I comfort thee? {20} Thy sons have fainted, they lie at the head of all the streets, as a wild bull in a net: they are full of the fury of the LORD, the rebuke of thy God. {21} Therefore hear now this, thou afflicted, and drunken, but not with wine: {22} Thus saith thy Lord the LORD, and thy God [that] pleadeth the cause of his people, Behold, I have taken out of thine hand the cup of trembling, [even] the dregs of the cup of my fury; thou shalt no more drink it again: {23} But I will put it into the hand of them that afflict thee; which have said to thy soul, Bow down, that we may go over: and thou hast laid thy body as the ground, and as the street, to them that went over.”


Ezekiel 23 is a historical parable in which Samaria and Jerusalem (Judah) are typified by two sisters, “Aholah” (Samaria) and “Aholibah” (Jerusalem) who commit spiritual adultery with the gods of the nations of Assyria and Babylon, whom God used to bring judgment against each of them respectively; in verse 34 this word is rendered as, “it and suck out”: “Thou shalt even drink it and suck [it] out, and thou shalt break the sherds thereof, and pluck off thine own breasts: for I have spoken [it], saith the Lord GOD. {35} Therefore thus saith the Lord GOD; Because thou hast forgotten me, and cast me behind thy back, therefore bear thou also thy lewdness and thy whoredoms. {36} The LORD said moreover unto me; Son of man, wilt thou judge Aholah and Aholibah? yea, declare unto them their abominations; {37} That they have committed adultery, and blood [is] in their hands, and with their idols have they committed adultery, and have also caused their sons, whom they bare unto me, to pass for them through [the fire], to devour [them]. {38} Moreover this they have done unto me: they have defiled my sanctuary in the same day, and have profaned my sabbaths. {39} For when they had slain their children to their idols, then they came the same day into my sanctuary to profane it; and, lo, thus have they done in the midst of mine house. {40} And furthermore, that ye have sent for men to come from far, unto whom a messenger [was] sent; and, lo, they came: for whom thou didst wash thyself, paintedst thy eyes, and deckedst thyself with ornaments, {41} And satest upon a stately bed, and a table prepared before it, whereupon thou hast set mine incense and mine oil. {42} And a voice of a multitude being at ease [was] with her: and with the men of the common sort [were] brought Sabeans from the wilderness, which put bracelets upon their hands, and beautiful crowns upon their heads. {43} Then said I unto [her that was] old in adulteries, Will they now commit whoredoms with her, and she [with them]? {44} Yet they went in unto her, as they go in unto a woman that playeth the harlot: so went they in unto Aholah and unto Aholibah, the lewd women. {45} And the righteous men, they shall judge them after the manner of adulteresses, and after the manner of women that shed blood; because they [are] adulteresses, and blood [is] in their hands. {46} For thus saith the Lord GOD; I will bring up a company upon them, and will give them to be removed and spoiled. {47} And the company shall stone them with stones, and dispatch them with their swords; they shall slay their sons and their daughters, and burn up their houses with fire. {48} Thus will I cause lewdness to cease out of the land, that all women may be taught not to do after your lewdness. {49} And they shall recompense your lewdness upon you, and ye shall bear the sins of your idols: and ye shall know that I [am] the Lord GOD.”


Once again, we understand spiritually that the Lord Jesus Christ was “wrung out” if you will “...at the foundation of the world.”  Let’s stop here, and Lord willing, we will pick this up in our next study.











Judges 6 - Part 45

October 23, 2019


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! This is Judges 6 - Part 45 and today’s date is October 23, 2019. I will be reading from Judges 6:33-40,


“Then all the Midianites and the Amalekites and the children of the east were gathered together, and went over, and pitched in the valley of Jezreel. {34} But the Spirit of the LORD came upon Gideon, and he blew a trumpet; and Abiezer was gathered after him. {35} And he sent messengers throughout all Manasseh; who also was gathered after him: and he sent messengers unto Asher, and unto Zebulun, and unto Naphtali; and they came up to meet them. {36} And Gideon said unto God, If thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said, {37} Behold, I will put a fleece of wool in the floor; [and] if the dew be on the fleece only, and [it be] dry upon all the earth [beside], then shall I know that thou wilt save Israel by mine hand, as thou hast said. {38} And it was so: for he rose up early on the morrow, and thrust the fleece together, and wringed the dew out of the fleece, a bowl full of water. {39} And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. {40} And God did so that night: for it was dry upon the fleece only, and there was dew on all the ground.”


In our previous study, we discovered that the terms, “and thrust together” along with “and wringed,” with regard to the “fleece” further corroborated the fact that the Lord Jesus was “crushed” in the Atonement, as He had become sin for His elect people, and drank the bitter dregs of the cup of the wrath of God for them. Moreover as Gideon (in this instance representing God the Father) “thrust together” “and wringed” the “fleece” (i.e., Christ as the “Lamb slain”) what resulted? There was enough dew to fill a bowl of water. You might recall that “dew” is parabolic language for “doctrine,” as we learned from Deuteronomy 32:2 as well as “the water of Life.” So Christ’s death “...from the foundation of the world” was the means whereby the “water of Life” was produced for each of God’s chosen saints. 


A Bowl [cephel:H5602]


The word, “a bowl” is only found one other time, and we have already considered it back in verse 25 of Judges 5:23-27, with regard to the “bowl” of milk that Jael (representing the elect) presented to Sisera (typifying Satan), which led to his unsuspecting death:


“Blessed above women shall Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite be, blessed shall she be above women in the tent. {25} He asked water, [and] she gave [him] milk; she brought forth butter in a lordly dish. [cephel:H5602]

 {26} She put her hand to the nail, and her right hand to the workmen's hammer; and with the hammer she smote Sisera, she smote off his head, when she had pierced and stricken through his temples. {27} At her feet he bowed, he fell, he lay down: at her feet he bowed, he fell: where he bowed, there he fell down dead.”


So in this word, “bowl,” we once again note a dual picture - judgment for Satan and all the non-elect and “the water of Life” for each child of God.


This brings us to…


Verses 39. “And Gideon said unto God, Let not thine anger be hot against me, and I will speak but this once: let me prove, I pray thee, but this once with the fleece; let it now be dry only upon the fleece, and upon all the ground let there be dew. 


I would like to start with the phrase, “I will speak but this once,” which is comprised of two Hebrew terms, since we have already discussed the other words in previous lessons:


I Will Speak [dabar:H1696] But This Once [pa`am:H6471] 

These two expressions emerge in the following five citations:


Genesis 18:32 records Abraham’s last plea for God not to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah, if ten elect were there: “And he said, Oh let not the Lord be angry, and I will speak [dabar:H1696] yet but this once [pa`am:H6471] : Peradventure ten shall be found there. And he said, I will not destroy [it] for ten's sake.”


Verse 11 of Deuteronomy 1:10-11 includes thee two words as Moses recounts Israel’s history in the first three chapters of this book: “The LORD your God hath multiplied you, and, behold, ye [are] this day as the stars of heaven for multitude.(The LORD God of your fathers make you a thousand times [pa`am:H6471] so many more as ye [are], and bless you, as he hath promised [dabar:H1696] you!)”


In verse 10 of 1 Samuel 3:1-14, God’s lays out the fact that God’s judgment began at His own “house” first as 1 Samuel, chapters 3-6 chronicle in this historical parable, in which God declares this truth to a young Samuel: 


“And the child Samuel ministered unto the LORD before Eli. And the word of the LORD was precious in those days; [there was] no open vision. {2} And it came to pass at that time, when Eli [was] laid down in his place, and his eyes began to wax dim, [that] he could not see; {3} And ere the lamp of God went out in the temple of the LORD, where the ark of God [was], and Samuel was laid down [to sleep]; {4} That the LORD called Samuel: and he answered, Here [am] I. {5} And he ran unto Eli, and said, Here [am] I; for thou calledst me. And he said, I called not; lie down again. And he went and lay down. {6} And the LORD called yet again, Samuel. And Samuel arose and went to Eli, and said, Here [am] I; for thou didst call me. And he answered, I called not, my son; lie down again. {7} Now Samuel did not yet know the LORD, neither was the word of the LORD yet revealed unto him. {8} And the LORD called Samuel again the third time. And he arose and went to Eli, and said, Here [am] I; for thou didst call me. And Eli perceived that the LORD had called the child. {9} Therefore Eli said unto Samuel, Go, lie down: and it shall be, if he call thee, that thou shalt say, Speak, LORD; for thy servant heareth. So Samuel went and lay down in his place. {10} And the LORD came, and stood, and called as at other times [pa`am:H6471], Samuel, Samuel. Then Samuel answered, Speak [dabar:H1696]; for thy servant heareth. {11] And the LORD said to Samuel, Behold, I will do a thing in Israel, at which both the ears of every one that heareth it shall tingle. {12} In that day I will perform against Eli all [things] which I have spoken concerning his house: when I begin, I will also make an end. {13} For I have told him that I will judge his house for ever for the iniquity which he knoweth; because his sons made themselves vile, and he restrained them not. {14} And therefore I have sworn unto the house of Eli, that the iniquity of Eli's house shall not be purged with sacrifice nor offering for ever.


In verse 16 of 1 Kings 22:16-28 (and its parallel verse in 2 Chronicles 18:15) these two terms are rendered, “how many times” and “thee that thou tell,” in which “about four hundered false prophets” declare to king Ahab of Israel that he will be victorious, although they are lying. King Ahab’s counterpart, King Jehoshaphat asks for “another prophet of the LORD besides” for a second opinion, and Micaiah is summoned who, sarcastically tells the king that he will be victorious, which prompts Ahab’s question in verse 16; in the final analysis, Micaiah utters the truth, yet he is not heeded: 


“And the king said unto him, How many times [pa`am:H6471]  shall I adjure thee that thou tell [dabar:H1696] me nothing but [that which is] true in the name of the LORD? {17} And he [Micaiah] said, I saw all Israel scattered upon the hills, as sheep that have not a shepherd: and the LORD said, These have no master: let them return every man to his house in peace. {18} And the king of Israel said unto Jehoshaphat, Did I not tell thee that he would prophesy no good concerning me, but evil? {19} And he said, Hear thou therefore the word of the LORD: I saw the LORD sitting on his throne, and all the host of heaven standing by him on his right hand and on his left. {20} And the LORD said, Who shall persuade Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramothgilead? And one said on this manner, and another said on that manner. {21} And there came forth a spirit, and stood before the LORD, and said, I will persuade him. {22} And the LORD said unto him, Wherewith? And he said, I will go forth, and I will be a lying spirit in the mouth of all his prophets. And he said, Thou shalt persuade [him], and prevail also: go forth, and do so. {23} Now therefore, behold, the LORD hath put a lying spirit in the mouth of all these thy prophets, and the LORD hath spoken evil concerning thee. {24} But Zedekiah the son of Chenaanah went near, and smote Micaiah on the cheek, and said, Which way went the Spirit of the LORD from me to speak unto thee? {25} And Micaiah said, Behold, thou shalt see in that day, when thou shalt go into an inner chamber to hide thyself. {26} And the king of Israel said, Take Micaiah, and carry him back unto Amon the governor of the city, and to Joash the king's son; {27} And say, Thus saith the king, Put this [fellow] in the prison, and feed him with bread of affliction and with water of affliction, until I come in peace. {28} And Micaiah said, If thou return at all in peace, the LORD hath not spoken by me. And he said, Hearken, O people, every one of you.”


Let Me Prove [nacah:H5254] I Pray Thee But This Once [pa`am:H6471]  


The next phrase that we want to turn our attention to is: “...let me prove, I pray thee, but this once,” which is comprised of two terms.  These two words are only found together in Numbers 14:22, as “and have tempted” and “times”: 


“Because all those men which have seen my glory, and my miracles, which I did in Egypt and in the wilderness, and have tempted  [nacah:H5254] me now these ten times [pa`am:H6471], and have not hearkened to my voice;”


We actually encountered the word, “prove,” in some of our earlier studies on Judges 2 and 3, in which God was “proving” Israel. This would also include all of mankind in Adam and Eve, the churches and denominations, or even God’s elect, as we read for example in 1 Peter 1:6-9.


“Wherein ye greatly rejoice, though now for a season, if need be, ye are in heaviness through manifold temptations: {7} That the trial of your faith, being much more precious than of gold that perisheth, though it be tried with fire, might be found unto praise and honour and glory at the appearing of Jesus Christ: {8} Whom having not seen, ye love; in whom, though now ye see [him] not, yet believing, ye rejoice with joy unspeakable and full of glory: {9} Receiving the end of your faith, [even] the salvation of [your] souls.” 


However in Judges 6, Gideon is the one “proving” God, as it were, by these “signs,” which as we have seen, have great spiritual significance. However, isn’t it amazing that God welcomes such enquiries?


Malachi 3:10 is one illustration, in which the “tithes” typify God’s elect, even though God utilizes a different set of Hebrew words: “Bring ye all the tithes into the storehouse, that there may be meat in mine house, and prove [bachan:H974] me now herewith [zo’th:H2063], saith the LORD of hosts, if I will not open you the windows of heaven, and pour you out a blessing, that [there shall] not [be room] enough [to receive it].”


Well, going back to verse 39, we learn that Gideon now asks for the fleece to be dry, and the ground wet with dew. We have already looked at all these terms previously, and we have understood what it meant for the “fleece” to be wet with “dew.”


The two terms, “ground” (’erets:H776) and “dew” (tal:H2919) are only found together in Judges 6:37, 39, and 40, and were previously discussed in Part 43, regarding the “ground” that was “dry.” It was noted that this word, “dry”  is associated with God’s judgment, as represented by a “drought,” a “sword,” and “desolation.” 


But what could God have in mind as far as the “ground” being wet with “dew” spiritually. 


And Upon All The Ground [’erets:H776] Let There Be Dew [tal:H2919]


Let’s start out investigation by looking at this word, “ground” by itself, even though we have run across this term in some of our earlier lessons in this book. Keep in mind, too, that the “dew” signifies “doctrine,” or the “water of Life,” and in turn, is the Word of God. 


In an earlier lesson, Exodus 16:14 was mentioned, along with its New Testament commentary in John 6, in which God associates the “ground” with the “dew” first, and then after the dew “was gone up” [(`alah:G5927) - denoting “resurrection” or God Himself spiritually)] with the “manna,” which is the “Bread of Life,” or the Lord Jesus Christ: 


And when the dew [tal:H2919] that lay was gone up, behold, upon the face of the wilderness [there lay] a small round thing, [as] small as the hoar frost on the ground.” [’erets:H776] 


Do you recall from one of our earlier studies that the “dry ground” was a portrayal of God’s judgment, and linked with, “drought,” “the sword,” and with “desolation”?


Here, however, the “ground” or “earth” that is covered with “dew” pictures the “Water of Life,” or the Gospel going forth during the day of salvation to reach “the nations of the elect.” Following that period, appropriately named by the LORD as the “Latter Rain,” the day of judgment commenced on May 21, 2011 in which the “land” or “earth” would never again see the “Water of Life,” or “dew” because  the last of the elect had been saved, and the spiritual Temple that God had been constructing since the days of Abel was finally finished.

In our next study, Lord willing, we will consider the one remaining phrase in verse 40, “And God did so that night,” and then we’ll proceed to chapter 7, as we continue to examine this historical parable concerning Judge Gideon.

Judges 6 - Part 46

January 1, 2020


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! Today I’m going to do something a little different and for the next few studies. I would like to go back to Judges 6 today to discuss one of three different words that are translated as “rock” in verses 20-21, and 26. So this will be Judges 6 - Part 46, and today’s date is December 30, 2019.  


You might recall me saying that I did not know why God had chosen to use three unrelated Hebrew terms that are all rendered as “rock”  in Judges 6.  So as we do this, Lord willing, could it be that God might open our understanding as we investigate this matter further. I’ll read Judges 6:20-21, and 26,


And the angel of God said unto him, Take the flesh and the unleavened cakes, and lay [them] upon this rock [cela`:H5553], and pour out the broth. And he did so. {21} Then the angel of the LORD put forth the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock [tsuwr:H6696], and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight. ... {26} And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock [ma`owz:H4581], in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down.


Rock [cela`:H5553]


The “angel of the LORD” (Who is Christ Himself) instructs Gideon to lay “the flesh” and “the unleavened cakes” - both of which point to the sacrifice of Christ - “upon this rock.” What “rock” is this? As we search out this term in Scripture, we encounter the following references, which help to clarify what God has in mind with respect to this term: 



In Judges 6 - Part 18, I mentioned a number of verses, in which “cela`” is found, most notably, Numbers 20:8, and 10-11, which is the account of Moses “striking the rock twice,” pointing to the Lamb slain from “...the foundation of the world,” as well as the demonstration on the Cross in 33 AD:


In Numbers 20:8-11 this expressions surfaces three times in verses 8, and 10-11, highlighting the actual Atonement that took place “...at the foundation of the world,” as well as the subsequent “demonstration” of that event in 33 AD: “Take the rod, and gather thou the assembly together, thou, and Aaron thy brother, and speak ye unto the rock [cela`:H5553] before their eyes; and it shall give forth his water, and thou shalt bring forth to them water out of the rock: so thou shalt give the congregation and their beasts drink. {9} And Moses took the rod from before the LORD, as he commanded him. {10} And Moses and Aaron gathered the congregation together before the rock [cela`:H5553], and he said unto them, Hear now, ye rebels; must we fetch you water out of this rock? {11} And Moses lifted up his hand, and with his rod he smote the rock [cela`:H5553] twice: and the water came out abundantly, and the congregation drank, and their beasts [also].


However in re-examining the various Scriptures that include “cela`” I ran across 1 Samuel 14:4, in which this word appears twice as “rock”: 


And between the passages, by which Jonathan sought to go over unto the Philistines' garrison, [there was] a sharp rock [cela`:H5553] on the one side, and a sharp rock [cela`:H5553]on the other side: and the name of the one [was] Bozez, and the name of the other Seneh. 


You might remember that in this account God enabled Jonathan and his armor bearer to kill “about twenty men” of the Philistines. The other interesting thing about this verse is that the two “rocks” are given names - “Bozez” (Bowtsets:H949) and “Seneh” (Ceneh:H5573). Here we see that God is spiritually linking these two names to this expression, “cela`.” What do these names signify? 


Bozez [Bowsets:H949] 


The name “Bozez” only surfaces in this verse, but it is derived from a root word that is almost identically spelled, which is “buwts” (H948). “Buwts” is translated 7 times as “fine linen” and once as “white linen.” Here are some prime examples:


1 Chronicles 15:27 reveals that David - a great type of the Lord Jesus - was clothed in this manner: And David [was] clothed with a robe of fine linen [buwts:H948], and all the Levites that bare the ark, and the singers, and Chenaniah the master of the song with the singers: David also [had] upon him an ephod of linen.


Moredecai also typifies the Savior in Esther 8:15, in which we learn the following: And Mordecai went out from the presence of the king in royal apparel of blue and white, and with a great crown of gold, and with a garment of fine linen [buwts:H948] and purple: and the city of Shushan rejoiced and was glad.


In verse 8 of Revelation 19:7-8 God defines what “fine linen” is spiritually:


Let us be glad and rejoice, and give honour to him: for the marriage of the Lamb is come, and his wife hath made herself ready. {8} And to her was granted that she should be arrayed in fine linen, clean and white: for the fine linen is the righteousness of saints.


Seneh [Ceneh:H5573] & [Cenah:H5572]


“Seneh” is only found in this verse as well, but its identically spelled root word “cenah” (H5572) is found 6 other times, but only in Exodus 3 and Deuteronomy 33: and always rendered as “the bush” - speaking of the “burning bush”: 


In Exodus 3:1-4 this term crops up in verses 2, 3, and 4: Now Moses kept the flock of Jethro his father in law, the priest of Midian: and he led the flock to the backside of the desert, and came to the mountain of God, [even] to Horeb. {2} And the angel of the LORD appeared unto him in a flame of fire out of the midst of a bush [cenah:H5572]: and he looked, and, behold, the bush [cenah:H5572] burned with fire, and the bush [cenah:H5572] [was] not consumed. {3} And Moses said, I will now turn aside, and see this great sight, why the bush [cenah:H5572] is not burnt. {4} And when the LORD saw that he turned aside to see, God called unto him out of the midst of the bush [cenah:H5572], and said, Moses, Moses. And he said, Here [am] I.


In Deuteronomy 33:16 this expression is rendered “in the bush”: And for the precious things of the earth and fulness thereof, and [for] the good will of him that dwelt in the bush [cenah:H5572] : let [the blessing] come upon the head of Joseph, and upon the top of the head of him [that was] separated from his brethren.


These names for the two “rocks” point, in the first instance, to the “fine linen,” - or the righteousness of Christ - with which God’s saints are clothed; and secondly  to God speaking to Moses “out of the burning bush,” reminding us of Jeremiah 23:29, which equates God’s Word with “fire,” (since God is a “consuming fire,” according to Hebrews 12:29) and employs the same Hebrew term, “cela`” for “the rock,” that was “broken in pieces” in the Atonement “...at the foundation of the world”:


[Is] not my word like as a fire? saith the LORD, and like a hammer [that] breaketh the rock [cela`:H5553] in pieces? 


A Closer Look At  Rock [cela`:H5553]


We can go a step further in our examination of this word, “cela`” by considering each of its God-breathed Hebrew letters (reading right to left): Samekh/Lamed/Ayin, in the hope that God will shed more spiritual light about this word, “rock,” and how it might relate to the other two Hebrew terms that are also translated as “rock”: 


 


Let’s consider each of these letters, starting with…


Samech [camak:H5564]


“Samech” is the 15th letter in the Hebrew alphabet; it is also a letter word that literally signifies “uphold me,” as rendered for instance in Psalm 119:116, under the heading of “SAMECH” (which spans verses 113-120):


Uphold me [camak:H5564] according unto thy word, that I may live: and let me not be ashamed of my hope.


“Samech” is also used frequently in connection with laying hands on the head of an animal to be sacrificed, as we learn from Leviticus 4:24,


And he shall lay [camak:H5564] his hand upon the head of the goat, and kill it in the place where they kill the burnt offering before the LORD: it [is] a sin offering. 


We also see this when Moses conferred his God-given authority upon his successor, Joshua as God instructed in Numbers 27:18, in which this expression is translated as “and lay”: And the LORD said unto Moses, Take thee Joshua the son of Nun, a man in whom [is] the spirit, and lay [camak:H5564] thine hand upon him;


In verse 24 of Psalm 37:23-24, this word is rendered as “upholdeth”: The steps of a [good] man are ordered by the LORD: and he delighteth in his way. {24} Though he fall, he shall not be utterly cast down: for the LORD upholdeth [camak:H5564]  [him with] his hand.


In Isaiah 63:5, this word appears twice as, “[there was] none to uphold” and “it upheld”: And I looked, and [there was] none to help; and I wondered that [there was] none to uphold [camak:H5564] : therefore mine own arm brought salvation unto me; and my fury, it upheld [camak:H5564] me.


Lamad [lamad:H3925]


The next letter word in the word, “cela`” is “lamed,” which is primarily rendered as “teach,” and it is also the 12th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. 


Psalm 25:4-5 and 9 translate it three times as “teach”: Shew me thy ways, O LORD; teach [lamad:H3925] me thy paths. {5} Lead me in thy truth, and teach [lamad:H3925] me: for thou [art] the God of my salvation; on thee do I wait all the day. ... {9} The meek will he guide in judgment: and the meek will he teach [lamad:H3925] his way.


However, in  Isaiah 29:24 this expression surfaces as, “shall learn”: They also that erred in spirit shall come to understanding, and they that murmured shall learn [lamad:H3925] doctrine.


And in Isaiah 48:17 this word is rendered as “which teacheth” again: Thus saith the LORD, thy Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel; I [am] the LORD thy God which teacheth [lamad:H3925] thee to profit, which leadeth thee by the way [that] thou shouldest go.


`Ayin [H5869]


The last Hebrew letter in the word, “cela`” is “`ayin,” which is the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is the letter word that is predominantly expressed as “eye,” or “sight,” as these next verses illustrate:


Under the heading, “AYIN” (spanning verses 121-128) in verse 123 of Psalm 119, this word appears as “Mine eyes”: Mine eyes [`ayin:H5869] fail for thy salvation, and for the word of thy righteousness.


Psalm 119:18 translates this term as “thou mine eyes” and is a wonderful verse for the child of God to pray anytime one reads or studies the Word of God: Open thou mine eyes [`ayin:H5869], that I may behold wondrous things out of thy law.


In Psalm 11:4 this expression is rendered as “his eyes”: The LORD [is] in his holy temple, the LORD'S throne [is] in heaven: his eyes [`ayin:H5869]  behold, his eyelids try, the children of men.


Summary Of The Letters Samech/Lamed/`Ayin In “cela`” (H5553)


Today we took a closer look at the three Hebrew letters that make up this word, “cela`” (H5553), or “rock” found in Judges 6:20,


And the angel of God said unto him, Take the flesh and the unleavened cakes, and lay [them] upon this rock [cela`:H5553], and pour out the broth. And he did so.  


These three letters (reading from right to left): are: Samech/Lamed/`Ayin, and we learned that each is a letter word, and represents one major shade of meaning, even though they might contain many others to a lesser degree:


  • “Samech” is the 15th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is primarily translated as, “uphold.”
  • “Lamed” is 12th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it has to do with “teaching.” 
  • “ `Ayin” is the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it mainly surfaces as “eye” or “sight.”


We understand of course that “cela`” (H5553) or  “rock”  is the Lord Jesus Christ. In Judges 6:20 we saw that the “angel of the LORD” (Who is Christ Himself) instructed Gideon to lay “the flesh” and “the unleavened cakes” - both of which point to the sacrifice of Christ - on the “rock” (cela`:H5553). Furthermore, each of the letters in “cela`” reveal an aspect of Christ’s Holy, Divine character, as He is inseparable from His Word, as He is the Word of God: He “upholds”...He “teaches”... Nothing is hid from His “sight.”


In our next study we will investigate the word that is translated, “rock” in Judges 6:21, which is “tsuwr” (H6696), and see how its letters relate to those of “cela`” (H5553)

Judges 6 - Part 47

January 6, 2020


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! As I mentioned in Part 46, I would like to go back to Judges 6 today to discuss the second of three different words that are all translated as “rock” in verses 20-21, and 26. So this will be Judges 6 - Part 47, and today’s date is January 6, 2020.  


You might recall me saying that I did not know why God had chosen to use three unrelated Hebrew terms that are all rendered as “rock”  in Judges 6.  So as we do this, Lord willing, could it be that God might open our understanding as we investigate this matter further. I’ll read Judges 6:20-21, and 26,


And the angel of God said unto him, Take the flesh and the unleavened cakes, and lay [them] upon this rock [cela`:H5553], and pour out the broth. And he did so. {21} Then the angel of the LORD put forth the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock [tsuwr:H6696], and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight. ... {26} And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock [ma`owz:H4581], in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down.


Summary Of The Letters Samech/Lamed/`Ayin In “cela`” (H5553)


In our previous study we took a closer look at the three Hebrew letters that make up the first Hebrew word, “cela`” (H5553), or “rock” found in Judges 6:20,


And the angel of God said unto him, Take the flesh and the unleavened cakes, and lay [them] upon this rock [cela`:H5553], and pour out the broth. And he did so.  


These three letters (reading from right to left): are: Samech/Lamed/`Ayin, and we learned that each is a letter word, and represents one major shade of meaning, even though they might contain many others to a lesser degree:


  • “Samech” is the 15th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is primarily translated as, “uphold.”
  • “Lamed” is 12th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it has to do with “teaching.” 
  • “ `Ayin” is the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it mainly surfaces as “eye” or “sight,” which includes spiritual understanding. (By the way this reminds us of Ephesians 1:18, The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints,)


So today we want to turn our attention to the second word for “rock” in Judges 6:21,


Then the angel of the LORD put forth the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock [tsuwr:H6697], and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight. 


Of The Rock [tsuwr:H6697]


This word for “rock” is “tsuwr” (H6697), and like “cela`” it is also primarily translated as “rock,” however it is used in a much more specific manner to equate to God Himself than “cela.`”  For instance, it appears as “rock” 64 times; but out of the 64 occurrences, almost half of the references are direct statements to God, as these next passages reveal:


Psalm 89:26 declares: He shall cry unto me, Thou [art] my father, my God, and the rock [tsuwr:H6697] of my salvation.

Psalm 92:15 states: To shew that the LORD [is] upright: [he is] my rock [tsuwr:H6697], and [there is] no unrighteousness in him.


Psalm 94:22 maintains: But the LORD is my defence; and my God [is] the rock [tsuwr:H6697] of my refuge.


Psalm 95:1 announces: O come, let us sing unto the LORD: let us make a joyful noise to the rock [tsuwr:H6697] of our salvation. 


One of the chapters that contains the greatest number of such references is Deuteronomy 32, in which this expression surfaces eight times in verses 4, 13, 15, 18, 30, 31(found twice), and 37:


[He is] the Rock [tsuwr:H6697], his work [is] perfect: for all his ways [are] judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right [is] he. {13} He made him ride on the high places of the earth, that he might eat the increase of the fields; and he made him to suck honey out of the rock, and oil out of the flinty rock [tsuwr:H6697];... {15} But Jeshurun waxed fat, and kicked: thou art waxen fat, thou art grown thick, thou art covered [with fatness]; then he forsook God [which] made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock [tsuwr:H6697] of his salvation. ... {18} Of the Rock [tsuwr:H6697] [that] begat thee thou art unmindful, and hast forgotten God that formed thee. ... {30} How should one chase a thousand, and two put ten thousand to flight, except their Rock [tsuwr:H6697] had sold them, and the LORD had shut them up? {31} For their rock [tsuwr:H6697] [is] not as our Rock [tsuwr:H6697], even our enemies themselves [being] judges. ... {37} And he shall say, Where [are] their gods, [their] rock [tsuwr:H6697] in whom they trusted,


A Closer Look At “Tsuwr” [H6697]


“Tsuwr” is also made up of three Hebrew letters (reading from right to left): Tzaddi/Vau/Resh. (Don’t be thrown off by the differences in the spellings of the transliteration of the letters, which can vary. I have tried to follow the spelling of the letters found in Psalm 119.)


 


Tzaddi [tsedeq:H6664][tsedaq:H6663]


“Tsaddi” is the 18th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. This letter word is expressed by “tsedeq” (H6664) and translated as “[are] righteous” and “righteousness”  in verses 138, 142 and 144 under the TSADDI section of Psalm 119:137-144,


Thy testimonies [that] thou hast commanded [are] righteous [tsedeq:H6664] and very faithful. ... {142} Thy righteousness [is] an everlasting righteousness [tsedeq:H6664], and thy law [is] the truth. ... {144} The righteousness [tsedeq:H6664] of thy testimonies [is] everlasting: give me understanding, and I shall live.


“Tsedeq” (H6664) is also identically spelled to “tsedaq” (H6663), which does not appear in Psalm 119, but is most commonly found as “justify” or “righteous.” 


In Psalm 119:137 and 142 we discover two other related words that stem from “tsedaq” (H6663). The first one in verse 137 is rendered as “Righteous” (tsaddiyq:H6662 ; the second one is translated as “Thy righteousness” (tsedaqah:H6666) in verse 142:


Righteous [tsaddiyq:H6662] [art] thou, O LORD, and upright [are] thy judgments….{142} Thy righteousness [tsedaqah:H6666] [is] an everlasting righteousness, and thy law [is] the truth.


 


Additionally, there is also another related word to “tsedeq” (H6664); in fact, it is a compound word comprised of  “tsedeq” (H6664) and the word “LORD” or “Yehovah” (H3068). It is rendered as “the LORD our Righteousness” in Jeremiah 23:6 and 33:16, or “Yehovah tsidqenuw” (H3072) 


Jeremiah 23:6 proclaims: In his days Judah shall be saved, and Israel shall dwell safely: and this [is] his name whereby he shall be called, THE LORD OUR RIGHTEOUSNESS. [Yehovah tsidqenuw:H3072] 

Similarly, Jeremiah 33:16 announces:  In those days shall Judah be saved, and Jerusalem shall dwell safely: and this [is the name] wherewith she shall be called, The LORD our righteousness. [Yehovah tsidqenuw:H3072] 


This title is also found in the New Testament, in 1 John 2:1, highlighting its paramount importance, as the sole basis for salvation:


“My little children, these things write I unto you, that ye sin not. And if any man sin, we have an advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous:” [dikaios:G1342] 

One of the things to keep in mind is that if two words have the same first three letters they are identical, in spite of having different Strong’s numbers.


Vau [vav:H2053]


The next letter word that we want to consider is “Vau,” which is the 6th letter of the Hebrew alphabet. Curiously, this term is only found 13 times, and always translated as “hooks” in the Tabernacle. In fact, there are only three other related words that begin with this letter, under the Strong numbers: H2052, H2054, and H2056. This word for “hooks” or “vav” is made up of two “vavs” side-by-side.



The first entry of this word, “vav” appears in verse 32 and 37 of Exodus 26:30-33 and 36-37, which describes the “vail” that separated the Holy of Holies from the rest of the Temple; secondly there was also a “hanging” that served as the entry point or “door” of the Tabernacle, both of which were supported by these “hooks” as well as other devices (like “sockets,” “taches,” “pillars,” “fillets,” and “chapiters”) that are beyond the scope of this study: 


And thou shalt rear up the tabernacle according to the fashion thereof which was shewed thee in the mount. {31} And thou shalt make a vail [of] blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen of cunning work: with cherubims shall it be made: {32} And thou shalt hang it upon four pillars of shittim [wood] overlaid with gold: their hooks [vav:H2053]

 [shall be of] gold, upon the four sockets of silver. {33} And thou shalt hang up the vail under the taches, that thou mayest bring in thither within the vail the ark of the testimony: and the vail shall divide unto you between the holy [place] and the most holy. ... {36} And thou shalt make an hanging for the door of the tent, [of] blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen, wrought with needlework. {37} And thou shalt make for the hanging five pillars [of] shittim [wood], and overlay them with gold, [and] their hooks [vav:H2053] [shall be of] gold: and thou shalt cast five sockets of brass for them.


The other chapters in which “hooks” are found are in Exodus, chapters 27, 36, and 38. For the sake of time, we will just consider Exodus 38, in which this term for “hooks” (H2053) crops up in verses 11-12, 17, 19, and 28,


And for the north side [the hangings were] an hundred cubits, their pillars [were] twenty, and their sockets of brass twenty; the hooks [vav:H2053]

 of the pillars and their fillets [of] silver. {12} And for the west side [were] hangings of fifty cubits, their pillars ten, and their sockets ten; the hooks [vav:H2053] of the pillars and their fillets [of] silver. ... {17} And the sockets for the pillars [were of] brass; the hooks [vav:H2053]

 of the pillars and their fillets [of] silver; and the overlaying of their chapiters [of] silver; and all the pillars of the court [were] filleted with silver. ... {19} And their pillars [were] four, and their sockets [of] brass four; their hooks [vav:H2053] [of] silver, and the overlaying of their chapiters and their fillets [of] silver. ... {28} And of the thousand seven hundred seventy and five shekels he made hooks [vav:H2053] for the pillars, and overlaid their chapiters, and filleted them.



Resh [ro’sh:H7218] Or [re’sh:H7217] 


The last letter in “tsuwr” is the “r” sound, or “ro’sh” (H7218). It is translated predominantly as “head,” but in Psalm 119:160 (under the heading of “RESH” that spans verses 153-160), it is rendered as “[from] the beginning”:  


Thy word [is] true [from] the beginning [ro’sh:H7218]: and every one of thy righteous judgments [endureth] for ever.


In Psalm 118:22 this term is expressed as “the head”: The stone [which] the builders refused is become the head [ro’sh:H7218] [stone] of the corner.


Proverbs 8:23 speaks about Christ being “set up” (or “poured out” or “melted”) in the Atonement at the “foundation of the world,” and our word “ro’sh” is translated as “from the beginning”:  I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning [ro’sh:H7218], or ever the earth was.


Incidentally, “ro’sh” reminds us of the majestic passage concerning the glorious Person and Work of the Lord Jesus Christ in verse 18 of Colossians 1:15-19,


Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature: {16} For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether [they be] thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: {17} And he is before all things, and by him all things consist. {18} And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all [things] he might have the preeminence. {19} For it pleased [the Father] that in him should all fulness dwell;


Summary Of The Letters Tzaddi/Vau/Resh In “Tsuwr” [H6697]


Today we took a closer look at the three Hebrew letters that make up this word, “tsuwr” (H6697), or “rock” found in Judges 6:21,


Then the angel of the LORD put forth the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock [tsuwr:H6697], and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight. 


These three letters (reading from right to left) are: Tzaddi/Vau/Resh, and we learned that each is a letter word, and represents one major shade of meaning, even though they might contain many others to a lesser degree:


  • “Tzaddi” is the 18th letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is the letter word for “Righteousness,” speaking of the Lord Jesus Christ Who is altogether “Righteous,” as is His Holy Word.


  • “Vau” is the 6th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is the letter word “hooks,” which were an integral part of the Tabernacle, where they were used extensively to hang the “vail,” and the “hanging” at the entrance, as well as the “curtains.” 


  • “Resh” is the 20th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is the letter word, “head,” exemplifying the Lord Jesus Who is the “Head” of the Body of Christ, and its glorious Husband and Savior.


I think we’ll stop here today. Lord willing, in our next study we will examine the last word for “rock” (ma`owz:H4581) in Judges 6:26.

Judges 6 - Part 48

January 10, 2020


Good evening, and welcome to Searching The Scriptures! As I mentioned in Parts 46 and 47, I would like to go back to Judges 6 today to discuss the third of three different words that are all translated as “rock” in verses 20-21, and 26. So this will be Judges 6 - Part 48, and today’s date is January 8, 2020.  


You might recall me saying that I did not know why God had chosen to use three unrelated Hebrew terms that are all rendered as “rock”  in Judges 6.  So as we do this, Lord willing, could it be that God might open our understanding as we investigate this matter further. I’ll read Judges 6:20-21, and 26,


And the angel of God said unto him, Take the flesh and the unleavened cakes, and lay [them] upon this rock [cela`:H5553], and pour out the broth. And he did so. {21} Then the angel of the LORD put forth the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock [tsuwr:H6696], and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight. ... {26} And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock [ma`owz:H4581], in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down.


Summary Of The Letters Samech/Lamed/`Ayin In “cela`” (H5553)


In our previous study we took a closer look at the three Hebrew letters that make up the first Hebrew word, “cela`” (H5553), or “rock” found in Judges 6:20,


And the angel of God said unto him, Take the flesh and the unleavened cakes, and lay [them] upon this rock [cela`:H5553], and pour out the broth. And he did so.  




These three letters (reading from right to left): are: Samech/Lamed/`Ayin, and we learned that each is a letter word, and represents one major shade of meaning, even though they might contain many others to a lesser degree:



 



  • “Samech” is the 15th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is primarily translated as, “uphold.”


  • “Lamed” is 12th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it has to do with “teaching.” 


  • “ `Ayin” is the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it mainly surfaces as “eye” or “sight,” which includes spiritual understanding. 


Summary Of The Letters Tzaddi/Vau/Resh In “Tsuwr” [H6697]


The three Hebrew letters (reading from right to left) that make up the word, “tsuwr” (H6697), or “rock” found in Judges 6:21 are: Tzaddi/Vau/Resh. 


Then the angel of the LORD put forth the end of the staff that [was] in his hand, and touched the flesh and the unleavened cakes; and there rose up fire out of the rock [tsuwr:H6697], and consumed the flesh and the unleavened cakes. Then the angel of the LORD departed out of his sight. 


We also learned that each of the three letters is a letter word, and represents one major shade of meaning, even though they might contain many others to a lesser degree:



 



  • “Tzaddi” is the 18th letter of the Hebrew alphabet and is the letter word for “Righteousness,” speaking of the Lord Jesus Christ Who is altogether “Righteous,” as is His Holy Word.


  • “Vau” is the 6th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is the letter word “hooks,” which were an integral part of the Tabernacle, where they were used extensively to hang the “vail,” and the “hanging” at the entrance, as well as the “curtains.” 


  • “Resh” is the 20th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is the letter word, “head,” exemplifying the Lord Jesus Who is the “Head” of the Body of Christ, and its glorious Husband and Savior.


Today we want to focus on the third word, translated as “rock” in Judges 6:26,


And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock [ma`owz:H4581], in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down.


Ma`owz [H4581] 


“Ma`owz” is primarily rendered as “strength” as these next passages maintain: 


Psalm 27:1 reveals: [[A Psalm] of David.]] The LORD [is] my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the LORD [is] the strength [ma`owz:H4581] of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?


Joel 3:16 likewise declares: The LORD also shall roar out of Zion, and utter his voice from Jerusalem; and the heavens and the earth shall shake: but the LORD [will be] the hope of his people, and the strength [ma`owz:H4581]  of the children of Israel.


Nahum 1:7 similarly adds: The LORD [is] good, a strong hold [ma`owz:H4581] in the day of trouble; and he knoweth them that trust in him.


“Ma`owz” is made up of the following  letters (reading from right to left): Mem/Ayin/Vav/Zayin: 



We have already discussed the two middle letters, “Ayin” and “Vav,” so let’s concentrate on the first and last letters, “Mem” and “Zayin”: 


Mem [mayim:H4581]


“Mem” is the 13th letter of the Hebrew alphabet and the letter word for “waters,” which is how it is overwhelmingly used as the following Scriptures illustrate:


“Waters” can refer to the “water of salvation” as we read in Isaiah 55:1, Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters [mayim:H4581], and he that hath no money; come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.


By contrast, in Isaiah 57:20, the “waters” refer to the wicked: But the wicked [are] like the troubled sea, when it cannot rest, whose waters [mayim:H4581] cast up mire and dirt.


“Waters” can also exemplify people, according to Isaiah 17:12-13,  Woe to the multitude of many people, [which] make a noise like the noise of the seas; and to the rushing of nations, [that] make a rushing like the rushing of mighty waters [mayim:H4581]! {13} The nations shall rush like the rushing of many waters: [mayim:H4581] but [God] shall rebuke them, and they shall flee far off, and shall be chased as the chaff of the mountains before the wind, and like a rolling thing before the whirlwind. 


This same analogy is picked up in Revelation 17:15, And he saith unto me, The waters [hydor:G5204] which thou sawest, where the whore sitteth, are peoples, and multitudes, and nations, and tongues.


“Zayin”


“Zayin” is the 7th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is a little more difficult to ascertain. However we do get a few clues, by going to the section under “ZAIN” in Psalm 119, which spans verses 49-56. In verses 49, 52, and 55 the term “remember” is repeated three times, and is the word “zakar” (H2042) which starts with the “Zayin”:


ZAIN. Remember [zakar:H2142] the word unto thy servant, upon which thou hast caused me to hope.... {52} I remembered [zakar:H2142] thy judgments of old, O LORD; and have comforted myself. ... {55} I have remembered [zakar:H2142] thy name, O LORD, in the night, and have kept thy law. 


This expression “remember” has as its object, “the word,” “thy judgments,” and “thy name.”  Furthermore, this term “zakar” (H2142) has an identically spelled derivative, which is “zakar” (H2145), and is primarily translated as “male.” A most interesting passage in which this word is found, is in verse 5 of Exodus 12:1-15, in which the expression “a male” (lamb or kid) surfaces as part of God’s instructions regarding the Feast of Passover:


And the LORD spake unto Moses and Aaron in the land of Egypt, saying, {2} This month [shall be] unto you the beginning of months: it [shall be] the first month of the year to you. {3} Speak ye unto all the congregation of Israel, saying, In the tenth [day] of this month they shall take to them every man a lamb, according to the house of [their] fathers, a lamb for an house: {4} And if the household be too little for the lamb, let him and his neighbour next unto his house take [it] according to the number of the souls; every man according to his eating shall make your count for the lamb. {5} Your lamb shall be without blemish, a male [zakar:H2145] of the first year: ye shall take [it] out from the sheep, or from the goats: {6} And ye shall keep it up until the fourteenth day of the same month: and the whole assembly of the congregation of Israel shall kill it in the evening. {7} And they shall take of the blood, and strike [it] on the two side posts and on the upper door post of the houses, wherein they shall eat it. {8} And they shall eat the flesh in that night, roast with fire, and unleavened bread; [and] with bitter [herbs] they shall eat it. {9} Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast [with] fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof. {10} And ye shall let nothing of it remain until the morning; and that which remaineth of it until the morning ye shall burn with fire. {11} And thus shall ye eat it; [with] your loins girded, your shoes on your feet, and your staff in your hand; and ye shall eat it in haste: it [is] the LORD'S passover. {12} For I will pass through the land of Egypt this night, and will smite all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast; and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgment: I [am] the LORD. {13} And the blood shall be to you for a token upon the houses where ye [are]: and when I see the blood, I will pass over you, and the plague shall not be upon you to destroy [you], when I smite the land of Egypt. {14} And this day shall be unto you for a memorial; and ye shall keep it a feast to the LORD throughout your generations; ye shall keep it a feast by an ordinance for ever. {15} Seven days shall ye eat unleavened bread; even the first day ye shall put away leaven out of your houses: for whosoever eateth leavened bread from the first day until the seventh day, that soul shall be cut off from Israel. 


This passage reminds one of course of what we read in 1 Corinthians 5:7-8, concerning the Atonement of the Lord Jesus, “at the foundation of the world”: 


Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us: {8} Therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness; but with the unleavened [bread] of sincerity and truth.


We read in Exodus 12:15 that the Feast of The Passover was to last “seven days,” which warrants our consideration since “Zayin” is also the 7th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and the number seven spiritually denotes perfection, as hundreds of verses attest; however for the sake of time I will only mention a few of them:


Genesis 7:4,  For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth.


Genesis 41:30 records the “seven years of famine” that relates to the first Great Tribulation period of Joseph’s day: And there shall arise after them seven years of famine; and all the plenty shall be forgotten in the land of Egypt; and the famine shall consume the land;


Revelation 4:5, And out of the throne proceeded lightnings and thunderings and voices: and [there were] seven lamps of fire burning before the throne, which are the seven Spirits of God.


Revelation 5:1 and 5 emphasize the “seven seals”    point to truths that would only be revealed at the “time of the end”; And I saw in the right hand of him that sat on the throne a book written within and on the backside, sealed with seven seals. ... {5} And one of the elders saith unto me, Weep not: behold, the Lion of the tribe of Juda, the Root of David, hath prevailed to open the book, and to loose the seven seals thereof.


Summary Of The Letters Mem/Ayin/Vav/Zayin: 


Today we took a closer look at the third word, translated as “rock” in Judges 6:26,


And build an altar unto the LORD thy God upon the top of this rock [ma`owz:H4581], in the ordered place, and take the second bullock, and offer a burnt sacrifice with the wood of the grove which thou shalt cut down.


“Ma`owz” is made up of the following  letters (reading from right to left): Mem/Ayin/Vav/Zayin:


  •  “Mem” is the 13th letter of the Hebrew alphabet and the letter word for “waters,” which can either refer to salvation or judgment. Additionally, we learned that “Mem” can also include the idea of people or nations.


  • “ `Ayin” is the 16th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and it mainly surfaces as “eye” or “sight,” which includes spiritual understanding. 


  • “Vau” is the 6th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is the letter word “hooks,” which were an integral part of the Tabernacle, where they were used extensively to hang the “vail,” and the “hanging” at the entrance, as well as the “curtains.” 
  • “Zayin” is the 7th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, and is associated as remembrance or a memorial pertaining to the Word of God, Who is the Lord Jesus Christ, as we saw with regard to His Atonement “at the foundation,”  as demonstrated by the Feast of Passover (which lasted 7 days) in the Old Testament, and His demonstration on the Cross in 33 AD. Being the 7th letter of the Hebrew alphabet, it emphasizes perfection.


Lord willing in our next study, I will attempt to lay out some of the similarities and differences that these three words for “rock” have in common.