Bible Ministries International

Bible Studies

A series of verse by verse studies by Gunther von Harringa Sr

Act 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

Text Studies

Select which series you would like to hear

Judges 4 - Part 13

Air Date: June 7, 2017


“And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon.”


Balaam’s Parable Regarding The Kenites (Cont.)


In our study of Judges 4:11, we want to learn more about Heber the Kenite (and especially to find out why he had “severed” or separated himself from them). In looking up the passages that contain the term “Kenites” (Qeyniy:H7017) we were directed to verses 21-22 of Numbers 24 (Balaam’s parable). Since this account gives some interesting details regarding the Kenites, and who they might represent spiritually, we have taken a detour to get better acqainted with these two intriguing verses, which state:


“And he looked on the Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and took up his parable, and said, Strong is thy dwellingplace, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock. {22} Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014] shall be wasted, until Asshur shall carry thee away captive.”


Keep in mind that H7014 is the root word, from which H7017 is derived.


Strong [’eythan:H386] Is Thy Dwellingplace [mowshab:H4186]


In our previous study, we left off at the phrase, “Strong [’eythan:H386] is thy dwellingplace [mowshab:H4186]…” These two terms only appear together in this verse, so we will have to consider them individually.


Strong [’eythan:H386] 


The word, “strong” is found in 13 passages (including Numbers 24:21) and is rendered in the following ways: strong(5x),mighty (4x), strength (2x), hard (1x), and once as rough.” Consider how God utilizes it in these citations:


Verse 2 of Micah 6:1-16 is very relevant to our discussion as the term “strong” appears  as “and ye strong,”  in the phrase “and ye strong foundations,” in which God is testifying as it were to the “mountains” and “hills” (which spiritually refer to kingdoms), and the very “foundations” of the earth itself,regarding this grievous indictment that God brings against national Israel. In fact in verse 5 God very deliberately references this account of Balaam and Balak, and Israel’s rebellion, for which she has incurred God’s wrath: “Hear ye now what the LORD saith; Arise, contend thou before the mountains, and let the hills hear thy voice. {2} Hear ye, O mountains, the LORD'S controversy, and ye strong [’eythan:H386] foundations of the earth: for the LORD hath a controversy with his people, and he will plead [yakach:H3198 - predominantly translated as “reprove” or “rebuke”] with Israel. {3} O my people, what have I done unto thee? and wherein have I wearied thee? testify against me. {4} For I brought thee up out of the land of Egypt, and redeemed thee out of the house of servants; and I sent before thee Moses, Aaron, and Miriam. {5} O my people, remember now what Balak king of Moab consulted, and what Balaam the son of Beor answered him from Shittim unto Gilgal; that ye may know the righteousness of the LORD. {6} Wherewith shall I come before the LORD, [and] bow myself before the high God? shall I come before him with burnt offerings, with calves of a year old? {7} Will the LORD be pleased with thousands of rams, [or] with ten thousands of rivers of oil? shall I give my firstborn [for] my transgression, the fruit of my body [for] the sin of my soul? {8} He hath shewed thee, O man, what [is] good; and what doth the LORD require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy God? {9} The LORD'S voice crieth unto the city, and [the man of] wisdom shall see thy name: hear ye the rod, and who hath appointed it. {10} Are there yet the treasures of wickedness in the house of the wicked, and the scant measure [that is] abominable? {11} Shall I count [them] pure with the wicked balances, and with the bag of deceitful weights? {12} For the rich men thereof are full of violence, and the inhabitants thereof have spoken lies, and their tongue [is] deceitful in their mouth. {13}Therefore also will I make [thee] sick in smiting thee, in making [thee] desolate because of thy sins. {14} Thou shalt eat, but not be satisfied; and thy casting down [shall be] in the midst of thee; and thou shalt take hold, but shalt not deliver; and [that] which thou deliverest will I give up to the sword. {15}Thou shalt sow, but thou shalt not reap; thou shalt tread the olives, but thou shalt not anoint thee with oil; and sweet wine, but shalt not drink wine. {16} For the statutes of Omri are kept, and all the works of the house of Ahab, and ye walk in their counsels; that I should make thee a desolation, and the inhabitants thereof an hissing: therefore ye shall bear the reproach of my people.


This is also the case in verse 24 of Amos 5, where the term “strong” is expressed in this fashion: “as a mighty,” in the phrase, “...and righteousness as a mighty stream.” Once again we witness a scathing denunciation of Israel, who typifies the institutional churches and denominations that came under God’s fierce wrath worldwide and without exception, on May 21, 1988, at the start of the Great Tribulation: 


“Hear ye this word which I take up against you, [even] a lamentation, O house of Israel. {2} The virgin of Israel is fallen; she shall no more rise: she is forsaken upon her land; [there is] none to raise her up.{3} For thus saith the Lord GOD; The city that went out [by] a thousand shall leave an hundred, and that which went forth [by] an hundred shall leave ten, to the house of Israel. {4} For thus saith the LORD unto the house of Israel, Seek ye me, and ye shall live: {5} But seek not Bethel [“the house of God”], nor enter into Gilgal, and pass not to Beersheba: for Gilgal shall surely go into captivity, and Bethel [“the house of God”] shall come to nought. {6} Seek the LORD, and ye shall live; lest he break out like fire in the house of Joseph, and devour [it], and [there be] none to quench [it] in Bethel.[“the house of God”] {7} Ye who turn judgment to wormwood, and leave off righteousness in the earth, {8} [Seek him] that maketh the seven stars and Orion, and turneth the shadow of death into the morning, and maketh the day dark with night: that calleth for the waters of the sea, and poureth them out upon the face of the earth: The LORD [is] his name:{9} That strengtheneth the spoiled against the strong, so that the spoiled shall come against the fortress. {10} They hate him that rebuketh in the gate, and they abhor him that speaketh uprightly. {11} Forasmuch therefore as your treading [is] upon the poor, and ye take from him burdens of wheat: ye have built houses of hewn stone, but ye shall not dwell in them; ye have planted pleasant vineyards, but ye shall not drink wine of them. {12} For I know your manifold transgressions and your mighty sins: they afflict the just, they take a bribe, and they turn aside the poor in the gate [from their right]. {13} Therefore the prudent shall keep silence in that time; for it [is] an evil time. {14}Seek good, and not evil, that ye may live: and so the LORD, the God of hosts, shall be with you, as ye have spoken. {15} Hate the evil, and love the good, and establish judgment in the gate: it may be that the LORD God of hosts will be gracious unto the remnant of Joseph. {16} Therefore the LORD, the God of hosts, the Lord, saith thus; Wailing [shall be] in all streets; and they shall say in all the highways, Alas! alas! and they shall call the husbandman to mourning, and such as are skilful of lamentation to wailing. {17} And in all vineyards [shall be] wailing: for I will pass through thee, saith the LORD.{18} Woe unto you that desire the day of the LORD! to what end [is] it for you? the day of the LORD [is] darkness, and not light. {19} As if a man did flee from a lion, and a bear met him; or went into the house, and leaned his hand on the wall, and a serpent bit him.{20} [Shall] not the day of the LORD [be] darkness, and not light? even very dark, and no brightness in it? {21} I hate, I despise your feast days, and I will not smell in your solemn assemblies. {22} Though ye offer me burnt offerings and your meat offerings, I will not accept [them]: neither will I regard the peace offerings of your fat beasts. {23} Take thou away from me the noise of thy songs; for I will not hear the melody of thy viols.{24} But let judgment run down as waters, and righteousness as a mighty [’eythan:H386] stream.{25} Have ye offered unto me sacrifices and offerings in the wilderness forty years, O house of Israel? {26} But ye have borne the tabernacle of your Moloch and Chiun your images, the star of your god, which ye made to yourselves. {27} Therefore will I cause you to go into captivity beyond Damascus, saith the LORD, whose name [is] The God of hosts.”


The reference to water relating to both righteouseness as well as to judgment in verse 24 is also highlighted in a few other passages as well: 


In Exodus 14:27, it is rendered as “to his strength” in this verse that recounts God collapsing the waters of the Red Sea to destroy Pharaoh Thutmosis III and the entire Egyptian army (even though previously God had pushed back those monumental walls of water to allow the Israelites safe passage to the other side; keep in mind that the “sea,” (which is repeated three times) is representative of “hell” or the grave: “And Moses stretched forth his hand over the sea [yam:H3220], and the sea [yam:H3220] returned to his strength [’eythan:H386] when the morning appeared; and the Egyptians fled against it; and the LORD overthrew the Egyptians in the midst of the sea.” [yam:H3220]


Verse 15 of Psalm 74:13-15 similarly alludes to this as well (and other rivers, such as the Jordan River, which depicts the same spiritual portrait): “Thou didst divide the sea by thy strength: thou brakest the heads of the dragons in the waters. {14} Thou brakest the heads of leviathan [representing Satan during the Great Tribulation] in pieces, [and] gavest him [to be] meat to the people inhabiting the wilderness. {15} Thou didst cleave the fountain and the flood: thou driedst up mighty [’eythan:H386] rivers.” 


In Jeremiah 49:7-22 we find another example of this same word, translated as “of the strong,” in verse 19; this portion of the chapter is targeting Edom (aka: Teman, Esau, Bozrah, etc. - all of which spiritually represent the institutional churches and denominations of our day.) However, what is most interesting about this chapter with regards to our current study, is what we read in verse 16, which ties into Numbers 24:21b, “...and thou puttest thy nest in a rock”: 


“Thy terribleness hath deceived thee, [and] the pride of thine heart, O thou that dwellest in the clefts of the rock, that holdest the height of the hill: though thou shouldest make thy nest as high as the eagle, I will bring thee down from thence, saith the LORD.


The phrase “the pride of thine heart” is also expressed by the language of “the clefts of the rock;” “the height of the hill,” and “thy nest as high as an eagle,” - pointing to that which is “lofty” and as a result, “lifted up with pride,” and whenever pride is present, a “fall” is not too far behind, as God ominously declares: “I will bring thee down from thence, saith the LORD.”


Jeremiah 49:7-22 declares: “Concerning Edom, thus saith the LORD of hosts; [Is] wisdom no more in Teman? is counsel perished from the prudent? is their wisdom vanished? {8} Flee ye, turn back, dwell deep, O inhabitants of Dedan; for I will bring the calamity of Esau upon him, the time [that] I will visit him. {9} If grapegatherers come to thee, would they not leave [some] gleaning grapes? if thieves by night, they will destroy till they have enough {10} But I have made Esau bare, I have uncovered his secret places, and he shall not be able to hide himself: his seed is spoiled, and his brethren, and his neighbours, and he [is] not.{11} Leave thy fatherless children, I will preserve [them] alive; and let thy widows trust in me. {12} For thus saith the LORD; Behold, they whose judgment [was] not to drink of the cup have assuredly drunken; and [art] thou he [that] shall altogether go unpunished? thou shalt not go unpunished, but thou shalt surely drink [of it]. {13} For I have sworn by myself, saith the LORD, that Bozrah shall become a desolation, a reproach, a waste, and a curse; and all the cities thereof shall be perpetual wastes. {14} I have heard a rumour from the LORD, and an ambassador is sent unto the heathen, [saying], Gather ye together, and come against her, and rise up to the battle. {15} For, lo, I will make thee small among the heathen, [and] despised among men. {16} Thy terribleness hath deceived thee, [and] the pride of thine heart, O thou that dwellest in the clefts of the rock, that holdest the height of the hill: though thou shouldest make thy nest as high as the eagle, I will bring thee down from thence, saith the LORD. {17} Also Edom shall be a desolation: every one that goeth by it shall be astonished, and shall hiss at all the plagues thereof. {18} As in the overthrow of Sodom and Gomorrah and the neighbour [cities] thereof, saith the LORD, no man shall abide there, neither shall a son of man dwell in it. {19} Behold, he shall come up like a lion from the swelling of Jordan against the habitation of the strong: but I will suddenly make him run away from her: and who [is] a chosen [man, that] I may appoint over her? for who [is] like me? and who will appoint me the time? and who [is] that shepherd that will stand before me? {20} Therefore hear the counsel of the LORD, that he hath taken against Edom; and his purposes, that he hath purposed against the inhabitants of Teman: Surely the least of the flock shall draw them out: surely he shall make their habitations desolate with them. {21} The earth is moved at the noise of their fall, at the cry the noise thereof was heard in the Red sea. {22} Behold, he shall come up and fly as the eagle, and spread his wings over Bozrah: and at that day shall the heart of the mighty men of Edom be as the heart of a woman in her pangs.” 


In verse 15 of Jeremiah 5:1-31 this word appears again as “it is a mighty” - introducing the Chaldeans or Babylonians - that God would utilize to bring judgment against His corporate people who would go into captivity for 70 years, ushering in the 2nd Great Tribulation period in the Bible (609 BC - 539 BC,  during which Jerusalem was destroyed in 587 BC):


“Run ye to and fro through the streets of Jerusalem, and see now, and know, and seek in the broad places thereof, if ye can find a man, if there be [any] that executeth judgment, that seeketh the truth; and I will pardon it. {2} And though they say, The LORD liveth; surely they swear falsely. {3} O LORD, [are] not thine eyes upon the truth? thou hast stricken them, but they have not grieved; thou hast consumed them, [but] they have refused to receive correction: they have made their faces harder than a rock; they have refused to return. {4} Therefore I said, Surely these [are] poor; they are foolish: for they know not the way of the LORD, [nor] the judgment of their God. {5} I will get me unto the great men, and will speak unto them; for they have known the way of the LORD, [and] the judgment of their God: but these have altogether broken the yoke, [and] burst the bonds. {6} Wherefore a lion out of the forest shall slay them, [and] a wolf of the evenings shall spoil them, a leopard shall watch over their cities: every one that goeth out thence shall be torn in pieces: because their transgressions are many, [and] their backslidings are increased. {7} How shall I pardon thee for this? thy children have forsaken me, and sworn by [them that are] no gods: when I had fed them to the full, they then committed adultery, and assembled themselves by troops in the harlots' houses. {8} They were [as] fed horses in the morning: every one neighed after his neighbour's wife. {9} Shall I not visit for these [things]? saith the LORD: and shall not my soul be avenged on such a nation as this? {10} Go ye up upon her walls, and destroy; but make not a full end: take away her battlements; for they [are] not the LORD'S. {11} For the house of Israel and the house of Judah have dealt very treacherously against me, saith the LORD. {12} They have belied the LORD, and said, [It is] not he; neither shall evil come upon us; neither shall we see sword nor famine: {13} And the prophets shall become wind, and the word [is] not in them: thus shall it be done unto them. {14} Wherefore thus saith the LORD God of hosts, Because ye speak this word, behold, I will make my words in thy mouth fire, and this people wood, and it shall devour them. {15} Lo, I will bring a nation upon you from far, O house of Israel, saith the LORD: it [is] a mighty nation, it [is] an ancient nation, a nation whose language thou knowest not, neither understandest what they say. {16} Their quiver [is] as an open sepulchre, they [are] all mighty men. {17} And they shall eat up thine harvest, and thy bread, [which] thy sons and thy daughters should eat: they shall eat up thy flocks and thine herds: they shall eat up thy vines and thy fig trees: they shall impoverish thy fenced cities, wherein thou trustedst, with the sword. {18} Nevertheless in those days, saith the LORD, I will not make a full end with you. {19} And it shall come to pass, when ye shall say, Wherefore doeth the LORD our God all these [things] unto us? then shalt thou answer them, Like as ye have forsaken me, and served strange gods in your land, so shall ye serve strangers in a land [that is] not yours. {20} Declare this in the house of Jacob, and publish it in Judah, saying, {21} Hear now this, O foolish people, and without understanding; which have eyes, and see not; which have ears, and hear not: {22} Fear ye not me? saith the LORD: will ye not tremble at my presence, which have placed the sand [for] the bound of the sea by a perpetual decree, that it cannot pass it: and though the waves thereof toss themselves, yet can they not prevail; though they roar, yet can they not pass over it? {23} But this people hath a revolting and a rebellious heart; they are revolted and gone. {24} Neither say they in their heart, Let us now fear the LORD our God, that giveth rain, both the former and the latter, in his season: he reserveth unto us the appointed weeks of the harvest. {25} Your iniquities have turned away these [things], and your sins have withholden good [things] from you. {26} For among my people are found wicked [men]: they lay wait, as he that setteth snares; they set a trap, they catch men. {27} As a cage is full of birds, so [are] their houses full of deceit: therefore they are become great, and waxen rich. {28} They are waxen fat, they shine: yea, they overpass the deeds of the wicked: they judge not the cause, the cause of the fatherless, yet they prosper; and the right of the needy do they not judge. {29} Shall I not visit for these [things]? saith the LORD: shall not my soul be avenged on such a nation as this? {30} A wonderful and horrible thing is committed in the land; The prophets prophesy falsely, and the priests bear rule by their means; and my people love [to have it] so: and what will ye do in the end thereof?” 


We’ll have to stop here today, and continue our examination of Judges 4 in our next study, as God wills.









Judges 4 - Part 14

Air Date: June 9, 2017


“And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon.”


Balaam’s Parable Regarding The Kenites (Cont.)


In our study of Judges 4:11, we want to learn more about Heber the Kenite (and especially to find out why he had “severed” or separated himself from them). In looking up the passages that contain the term “Kenites” (Qeyniy:H7017) we were directed to verses 21-22 of Balaam’s parable, in Numbers 24. Since this account gives some interesting details regarding the Kenites, and who they might represent spiritually, we have taken a detour to get better acqainted with these two intriguing verses, which state:


“And he looked on the Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and took up his parable, and said, Strong is thy dwellingplace, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock. {22} Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014] shall be wasted, until Asshur shall carry thee away captive.”


Strong [’eythan:H386] Is Thy Dwellingplace [mowshab:H4186]


In our last study we focused on the term, “strong” in the phrase “Strong is thy dwellingplace…” and we saw that it was used in a number of passages to refer to national Israel, along with the phrase, “...and thou puttest [suwm:H7760] thy nest [qen:H7064] in a rock [cela`:H5553].”  Before moving on I would like to take a closer look at some of the other verses that contain this phrase or some of its words.


And Thou Puttest Thy Nest In A Rock


Verse 3-4 of Obadiah 1:1-4 reveal: “The vision of Obadiah. Thus saith the Lord GOD concerning Edom; We have heard a rumour from the LORD, and an ambassador is sent among the heathen, Arise ye, and let us rise up against her in battle. {2} Behold, I have made thee small among the heathen: thou art greatly despised. {3} The pride of thine heart hath deceived thee, thou that dwellest in the clefts of the rock, whose habitation [is] high; that saith in his heart, Who shall bring me down to the ground? {4} Though thou exalt [thyself] as the eagle, and though thou set [suwm:H7760] thy nest [qen:H7064] among the stars, thence will I bring thee down, saith the LORD.”


Similarly, Habakkuk 2:9 acknowledges, “Woe to him that coveteth an evil covetousness to his house, that he may set [suwm:H7760] his nest [qen:H7064] on high, that he may be delivered from the power of evil!”


Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014]


Now let’s consider the first phrase in verse 22, “Nevertheless the Kenite…” (Qayin:H7014), which is actually the root word for the “the Kenites” (Qeyniy:H7017), mentioned in verse 21:


“And he looked on the Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and took up his parable, and said, Strong is thy dwellingplace, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock. {22} Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014] shall be wasted, until Asshur shall carry thee away captive.”


What is noteworthy about this word is that it appears only once as “Kenite” in this verses, and 16 other times it is rendered as “Cain”!  So, here we have a really big clue, as to what is in view spiritually with the term, “Kenite.” And what does the Bible reveal about Cain? The longest record of information about Cain is found in Genesis 4; I’ll just read verses 1-3, 5-6, 8-9, 13, and 15-16:


“And Adam knew Eve his wife; and she conceived, and bare Cain [Qayin:H7014], and said, I have gotten a man from the LORD. {2} And she again bare his brother Abel. And Abel was a keeper of sheep, but Cain [Qayin:H7014] was a tiller of the ground. {3} And in process of time it came to pass, that Cain [Qayin:H7014] brought of the fruit of the ground an offering unto the LORD. ... {5} But unto Cain [Qayin:H7014] and to his offering he had not respect. And Cain [Qayin:H7014] was very wroth, and his countenance fell. {6} And the LORD said unto Cain [Qayin:H7014], Why art thou wroth? and why is thy countenance fallen? ... {8} And Cain [Qayin:H7014] talked with Abel his brother: and it came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain [Qayin:H7014] rose up against Abel his brother, and slew him. {9} And the LORD said unto Cain [Qayin:H7014], Where [is] Abel thy brother? And he said, I know not: [Am] I my brother's keeper? ... {13} And Cain [Qayin:H7014] said unto the LORD, My punishment [is] greater than I can bear. ... {15} And the LORD said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain [Qayin:H7014], vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold. And the LORD set a mark upon Cain [Qayin:H7014], lest any finding him should kill him. {16} And Cain [Qayin:H7014] went out from the presence of the LORD, and dwelt in the land of Nod, on the east of Eden.”


The New Testament offers a further commentary on Cain as well: 


Hebrews 11:4 reveals, “By faith Abel offered unto God a more excellent sacrifice than Cain [Kain:G2535], by which he obtained witness that he was righteous, God testifying of his gifts: and by it he being dead yet speaketh.”


Verse 12 of 1 John 3:11-12, likewise states: “Not as Cain [Kain:G2535], [who] was of that wicked one, and slew his brother. And wherefore slew he him? Because his own works were evil, and his brother's righteous.”


Jude 1:11 also maintains, and notice again the association with Balaam (as we saw in Micah 6:5 in our last study with respect to the Kenites: “Woe unto them! for they have gone in the way of Cain [Kain:G2535], and ran greedily after the error of Balaam for reward, and perished in the gainsaying of Core.”[Korah]


Nevertheless The Kenite [Qayin:H7014] Shall [im:H518] Be Wasted [ba`ar:H1197]


We learn from the first phrase in Numbers 24:22, “Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014] shall be [im:H518] wasted…” [ba`ar:H1197]. The subsequent citations reflect some of the ways that God utilizes this term, “wasted” which is predominantly rendered as “burn,” “burn away,” and “kindle”: 


In verse 11 of Deuteronomy 4:9-14, this word is translated as “burned”: “Only take heed to thyself, and keep thy soul diligently, lest thou forget the things which thine eyes have seen, and lest they depart from thy heart all the days of thy life: but teach them thy sons, and thy sons' sons; {10} [Specially] the day that thou stoodest before the LORD thy God in Horeb, when the LORD said unto me, Gather me the people together, and I will make them hear my words, that they may learn to fear me all the days that they shall live upon the earth, and [that] they may teach their children.{11} And ye came near and stood under the mountain; and the mountain burned [ba`ar:H1197] with fire unto the midst of heaven, with darkness, clouds, and thick darkness. {12} And the LORD spake unto you out of the midst of the fire: ye heard the voice of the words, but saw no similitude; only [ye heard] a voice. {13} And he declared unto you his covenant, which he commanded you to perform, [even] ten commandments; and he wrote them upon two tables of stone. {14} And the LORD commanded me at that time to teach you statutes and judgments, that ye might do them in the land whither ye go over to possess it.”


This term is rendered “So shalt thou put away” in verse 5 of Deuteronomy 13:1-5, “If there arise among you a prophet, or a dreamer of dreams, and giveth thee a sign or a wonder, {2} And the sign or the wonder come to pass, whereof he spake unto thee, saying, Let us go after other gods, which thou hast not known, and let us serve them; {3} Thou shalt not hearken unto the words of that prophet, or that dreamer of dreams: for the LORD your God proveth you, to know whether ye love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul. {4} Ye shall walk after the LORD your God, and fear him, and keep his commandments, and obey his voice, and ye shall serve him, and cleave unto him. {5} And that prophet, or that dreamer of dreams, shall be put to death; because he hath spoken to turn [you] away from the LORD your God, which brought you out of the land of Egypt, and redeemed you out of the house of bondage, to thrust thee out of the way which the LORD thy God commanded thee to walk in. So shalt thou put [ba`ar:H1197]  the evil away [ba`ar:H1197]  from the midst of thee.”


In 2 Kings 23:24 we learn of what good king Josiah did, in obedience to God’s Word, in which this word is also expressed as “put away”: “Moreover the [workers with] familiar spirits, and the wizards, and the images, and the idols, and all the abominations that were spied in the land of Judah and in Jerusalem, did Josiah put away [ba`ar:H1197], that he might perform the words of the law which were written in the book that Hilkiah the priest found in the house of the LORD.”


In the historical parable found in the book of Esther, king Ahasuerus represents God, and Vashti, his wife, national Israel; this word is rendered as “burned” in Esther 1:12: “But the queen Vashti refused to come at the king's commandment by [his] chamberlains: therefore was the king very wroth, and his anger burned [ba`ar:H1197] in him.”


Ezekiel 1:13 translates this word as “[was] like burning”: “As for the likeness of the living creatures, their appearance [was] like burning [ba`ar:H1197] coals of fire, [and] like the appearance of lamps: it went up and down among the living creatures; and the fire was bright, and out of the fire went forth lightning.”


Lastly, in Malachi 4:1, this term is expressed as “For, behold, the day cometh, that shall burn [ba`ar:H1197] as an oven; and all the proud, yea, and all that do wickedly, shall be stubble: and the day that cometh shall burn them up, saith the LORD of hosts, that it shall leave them neither root nor branch.”


Until Asshur [’Ashshuwr:H804] Shall Carry Thee Away Captive [shabah:H7617]


The last phrase that we want to consider in Numbers 24:22 is: “...until Asshur shall carry thee away captive.” These two words only appear in this verses, so once again we will have to investigate them individually:


In 2 Kings 17:1-18 we read about how Samaria (or the 10 northern tribes) capitulated to the Assyrians in 709 BC, as a judgment from God for their sinful rebellion: “In the twelfth year of Ahaz king of Judah began Hoshea the son of Elah to reign in Samaria over Israel nine years. {2} And he did [that which was] evil in the sight of the LORD, but not as the kings of Israel that were before him. {3} Against him came up Shalmaneser king of Assyria [’Ashshuwr:H804]; and Hoshea became his servant, and gave him presents. {4} And the king of Assyria found conspiracy in Hoshea: for he had sent messengers to So king of Egypt, and brought no present to the king of Assyria, as [he had done] year by year: therefore the king of Assyria [’Ashshuwr:H804] shut him up, and bound him in prison. {5} Then the king of Assyria came up throughout all the land, and went up to Samaria, and besieged it three years. {6} In the ninth year of Hoshea the king of Assyria [’Ashshuwr:H804] took Samaria, and carried Israel away into Assyria [’Ashshuwr:H804], and placed them in Halah and in Habor [by] the river of Gozan, and in the cities of the Medes. {7} For [so] it was, that the children of Israel had sinned against the LORD their God, which had brought them up out of the land of Egypt, from under the hand of Pharaoh king of Egypt, and had feared other gods, {8} And walked in the statutes of the heathen, whom the LORD cast out from before the children of Israel, and of the kings of Israel, which they had made. {9} And the children of Israel did secretly [those] things that [were] not right against the LORD their God, and they built them high places in all their cities, from the tower of the watchmen to the fenced city. {10} And they set them up images and groves in every high hill, and under every green tree: {11} And there they burnt incense in all the high places, as [did] the heathen whom the LORD carried away before them; and wrought wicked things to provoke the LORD to anger: {12} For they served idols, whereof the LORD had said unto them, Ye shall not do this thing. {13} Yet the LORD testified against Israel, and against Judah, by all the prophets, [and by] all the seers, saying, Turn ye from your evil ways, and keep my commandments [and] my statutes, according to all the law which I commanded your fathers, and which I sent to you by my servants the prophets. {14} Notwithstanding they would not hear, but hardened their necks, like to the neck of their fathers, that did not believe in the LORD their God. {15} And they rejected his statutes, and his covenant that he made with their fathers, and his testimonies which he testified against them; and they followed vanity, and became vain, and went after the heathen that [were] round about them, [concerning] whom the LORD had charged them, that they should not do like them. {16} And they left all the commandments of the LORD their God, and made them molten images, [even] two calves, and made a grove, and worshipped all the host of heaven, and served Baal. {17} And they caused their sons and their daughters to pass through the fire, and used divination and enchantments, and sold themselves to do evil in the sight of the LORD, to provoke him to anger. {18} Therefore the LORD was very angry with Israel, and removed them out of his sight: there was none left but the tribe of Judah only.”



We’ll have to stop here, and Lord willing, continue this in our next study.






Judges 4 - Part 15

Air Date: June 12, 2017


“And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon.”


Until Asshur Shall Carry Thee Away Captive


At the close of our last study we were looking at the remaining phrase in Numbers 24:22, “...until Asshur shall carry thee away captive.” We noted that the 10 tribes (Samaria) in the north were carried away captive by the Assyrians (or “Asshur”) in 709 BC; exactly 100 years later, in 609 BC Judah (the 2 southern tribes) was carried away captive by the Babylonians (known as the second “Great Tribulation” period in the Bible). In both cases, God used these heathen nations to execute His fierce wrath upon Israel for their spiritual idolatry/adultery. Nonetheless, Jeremiah 50:17-18 explains that God then turned around and punished these same nations: 


“Israel [is] a scattered sheep; the lions have driven [him] away: first the king [melek:H4428] of Assyria [’Ashshuwr:H804] hath devoured him; and last this Nebuchadrezzar king [melek:H4428] of Babylon [Babel:H894] hath broken his bones. {18} Therefore thus saith the LORD of hosts, the God of Israel; Behold, I will punish the king [melek:H4428] of Babylon [Babel:H894] and his land, as I have punished the king [melek:H4428] of Assyria.” [’Ashshuwr:H804]


Babylon was defeated in one night, as Cyrus (a type of Christ - picturing God beginning His rule of judgment over the world on May 21, 2011) the Medo-Persian king came as “a thief in the night” to vanquish the kingdom of Babylon, as we read in Daniel 5:22-31,


“And thou his son, O Belshazzar, hast not humbled thine heart, though thou knewest all this; {23} But hast lifted up thyself against the Lord of heaven; and they have brought the vessels of his house before thee, and thou, and thy lords, thy wives, and thy concubines, have drunk wine in them; and thou hast praised the gods of silver, and gold, of brass, iron, wood, and stone, which see not, nor hear, nor know: and the God in whose hand thy breath [is], and whose [are] all thy ways, hast thou not glorified: {24 Then was the part of the hand sent from him; and this writing was written. {25} And this [is] the writing that was written, MENE, MENE, TEKEL, UPHARSIN. {26} This [is] the interpretation of the thing: MENE; God hath numbered thy kingdom, and finished it. {27} TEKEL; Thou art weighed in the balances, and art found wanting. {28} PERES; Thy kingdom is divided, and given to the Medes and Persians. {29} Then commanded Belshazzar, and they clothed Daniel with scarlet, and [put] a chain of gold about his neck, and made a proclamation concerning him, that he should be the third ruler in the kingdom. {30} In that night was Belshazzar the king of the Chaldeans slain. {31} And Darius the Median took the kingdom, [being] about threescore and two years old. 


Likewise, the Assyrian army was decimated, as they attempted to overthrow Judah, by the “angel of the LORD,” according to 2 Kings 19:35, 


“And it came to pass that night, that the angel of the LORD went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians an hundred fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they [were] all dead corpses.”


The Reason Heber Separated Himself From The Kenites


So we see from this detour, why Heber would have separated himself from the Kenites, as they typify Cain - who represents the institutional churches and denominations that came under the wrath of God as of May 21, 1988 - at the start of the final Great Tribulation of our day, in fulfillment of 1 Peter 4:17-18,


“For the time [is come] that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if [it] first [begin] at us, what shall the end [be] of them that obey not the gospel of God? {18} And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?”


And Pitched [natah:H5186] His Tent [’ohel:H168] Unto The Plain [’elown:H436] Of Zaanaim, [Tsa`ananniym:H6815] Which [Is] By Kedesh [Qedesh:H6943]


With that in mind, let’s return to Judges 4:11, and the last phrase in that verse: “Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh,” which is comprised of four terms, but since we have already considered, Kedesh, which is identically spelled as its root word (qadash:H6942), and means to “sanctify” or “hallow,” we will only examine the other three words.


And Pitched [natah:H5186] His Tent [’ohel:H168] 


The two words, “and pitched” (natah:H5186) and “his tent” (’ohel:H168) appear together in 15 citations. As you will see from the subsequent passages, these two terms can refer to the literal tents that the patriarchs lived in; the tabernacle that God instructed Moses to build; deep space which God created that keeps expanding; the kingdom of God, as well as, the destruction of the external representation of that kingdom on earth (namely, national Israel in the first instance, and secondly, the end-time institutional churches and denominations of our day):


In verse 8 of Genesis 12:7-9 we read: “And the LORD appeared unto Abram, and said, Unto thy seed will I give this land: and there builded he an altar unto the LORD, who appeared unto him. {8} And he removed from thence unto a mountain on the east of Bethel, and pitched [natah:H5186] his tent [’ohel:H168], [having] Bethel [Beyth-’El:H1008 - “house of God”] on the west, and Hai [`Ay:H5857 - identical to (`iy:H5856) - “ruinous heaps”] on the east: and there he builded an altar unto the LORD, and called upon the name of the LORD. {9} And Abram journeyed, going on still toward the south.”


Similarly we read of Isaac in verse 25 of Gen 26:23-25, “And he [Isaac] went up from thence to Beersheba. [“the well of the seven-fold oath”] {24} And the LORD appeared unto him the same night, and said, I [am] the God of Abraham thy father: fear not, for I [am] with thee, and will bless thee, and multiply thy seed for my servant Abraham's sake. {25} And he builded an altar there, and called upon the name of the LORD, and pitched [natah:H5186] his tent [’ohel:H168] there: and there Isaac's servants digged a well.” 


Verse 21 of Gen 35:16-21 recounts that Jacob (Israel) followed in the steps of his father and grandfather: “And they journeyed from Bethel [Beyth-’El:H1008 - “house of God”]; and there was but a little way to come to Ephrath [’Ephraath:H672 - “fruitfulness” - associated with Bethlehem - “the house of bread”]: and Rachel travailed, and she had hard labour. {17} And it came to pass, when she was in hard labour, that the midwife said unto her, Fear not; thou shalt have this son also. {18} And it came to pass, as her soul was in departing, (for she died ) that she called his name Benoni [Ben-’Owniy:H1126 - “son of my sorrow”]: but his father called him Benjamin [Binyamin:H1144 - “son of the right hand”]. {19} And Rachel died, and was buried in the way to Ephrath, which [is] Bethlehem. {20} And Jacob set a pillar upon her grave: that [is] the pillar of Rachel's grave unto this day. {21} And Israel [Jacob] journeyed, and spread [natah:H5186] his tent [’ohel:H168] beyond the tower [migdal:H4026] of Edar.”[Migdal - `Eder:H4029 - “tower of the flock”]


There is also a very helpful commentary about the patriarchs and their relationship to their “tents” or “tabernacles” in Hebrews 11:8-10, “By faith Abraham, when he was called to go out into a place which he should after receive for an inheritance, obeyed; and he went out, not knowing whither he went. {9} By faith he sojourned in the land of promise, as [in] a strange country, dwelling in tabernacles with Isaac and Jacob, the heirs with him of the same promise: {10} For he looked for a city which hath foundations, whose builder and maker [is] God.


What Hebrews 11:8-10 is underscoring spiritually is this: Although the patriarchs were exceedingly wealthy financially, they chose to live in “tents” - due in part to the nature of their livelihood as herdsmen - but more importantly those tents symbolized the temporary or transitory nature of a genuine Christian’s life on this earth, which is not his real home, which is Heaven - the eternal “city” that the patriarchs and all God’s elect are eagerly anticipating, and patiently waiting for. The “tent” or “tabernacle” also typifies the Lord Jesus Christ Himself, as He lovingly indwells His children, and they in Him, as Rev 21:1-3 so beautifully highlights:


“And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea. {2} And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. {3} And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle [skene:G4633] of God [is] with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, [and be] their God.”  


In Exo 33:7, the term “tabernacle” is also repeated 3 times: “And Moses took the tabernacle [’ohel:H168], and pitched [natah:H5186] it without the camp, afar off from the camp, and called it the Tabernacle [’ohel:H168] of the congregation. And it came to pass, [that] every one which sought the LORD went out unto the tabernacle [’ohel:H168]  of the congregation, which [was] without [chuwts:H2351 - “outside] the camp.”[machaneh:H4264]


The last two words in Exo 33:7 are significant as they also relate to the demonstration of the Lord Jesus Christ on the Cross (typifying His sacrifice “...from the foundation of the world,” according to Revelation 13:8, and numerous other scriptures), as we read in Hebrews 13:11-15, in which we find two similar expressions, “without the camp,” and “without the gate,” indicating that Christ was crucified outside the gates or walls of Jerusalem, at Golgotha, known as “the place of the skull”:


“For the bodies of those beasts, whose blood is brought into the sanctuary by the high priest for sin, are burned without [exo:G1854] the camp. [parembole:G3925] {12} Wherefore Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered without [exo:G1854] the gate. [pyle:G4439] {13} Let us go forth therefore unto him without the camp, bearing his reproach. {14} For here have we no continuing city, but we seek one to come. {15} By him therefore let us offer the sacrifice of praise to God continually, that is, the fruit of [our] lips giving thanks to his name.”


1 Chronicles 16:1 begins a chapter that depicts the return of the Ark of the Covenant from the house of Obededom, and as a result was an occasion for much rejoicing; to celebrate this event, David, under divine inspiration, penned the words taken from a few psalms: “So they brought the ark of God, and set it in the midst of the tent [’ohel:H168] that David had pitched for it [natah:H5186]: and they offered burnt sacrifices and peace offerings before God.”


On the other hand, verse 22 of Isa 40:21-22 reveals God’s unfathomable power and might: “Have ye not known? have ye not heard? hath it not been told you from the beginning? have ye not understood from the foundations of the earth? {22} [It is] he that sitteth upon the circle of the earth, and the inhabitants thereof [are] as grasshoppers; that stretcheth out [natah:H5186] the heavens as a curtain, and spreadeth them out as a tent [’ohel:H168] to dwell in:”


Verse 2 of Isaiah 54:1-2 is a passage that speaks of the unparalleled penetration of the Gospel into the world to reach the last of the elect from 1994 to May 21, 2011, during the second great outpouring of the Holy Spirit known as the “latter rain” (The first one took place on Pentecost, May 22, 33 AD, when God instituted the era of the New Testament churches, which continued for 1955 years.):“Sing, O barren, thou [that] didst not bear; break forth into singing, and cry aloud, thou [that] didst not travail with child: for more [are] the children of the desolate [i.e., “Sarah” - see Galatians 4:21-31] than the children of the married wife [i.e., “Hagar” - see Galatians 4:21-31], saith the LORD. {2} Enlarge the place of thy tent [’ohel:H168] and let them stretch forth [natah:H5186] the curtains of thine habitations: spare not, lengthen thy cords, and strengthen thy stakes;”


However in verse 20 of Jeremiah 10:20-22, the “tent” or “tabernacle” in view is the external representation of the kingdom of God on earth (Israel in the first instance, and secondly, the New Testament “church age”) which came under the wrath of God on April 1, 33 AD, when Christ hung on the Cross, and the veil of the Temple was ripped from top to bottom, and then on May 21, 1988, when the Holy Spirit exited  all churches worldwide and without exception: “My tabernacle is spoiled, and all my cords are broken: my children are gone forth of me, and they [are] not: [there is] none to stretch forth [natah:H5186] my tent [’ohel:H168] any more, and to set up my curtains. {21} For the pastors are become brutish, and have not sought the LORD: therefore they shall not prosper, and all their flocks shall be scattered. {22} Behold, the noise of the bruit is come, and a great commotion out of the north country, to make the cities of Judah desolate, [and] a den of dragons.”


Unto The Plain [’elown:H436] Of Zaanaim, [Tsa`ananniym:H6815] 


The next phrase we want to consider in Judges 4:11 is: “...unto the plain of Zaanaim…” which is comprised of two terms.  These two words are only found in this verse, so again, we will have to consider them individually. I think, I’ll start with the term, “Zaanaim” (Tsa`ananniym:H6815), which is only found in one other citation - in verse 33 of Joshua 19:32-39, and describes the borders of the tribe of Naphtali (which we encountered previously in Judges 4 - Part 8):


“And their coast was from Heleph, from Allon to Zaanannim [Tsa`ananniym:H6815], and Adami, Nekeb, and Jabneel, unto Lakum; and the outgoings thereof were at Jordan:”


“Zaanaim” is the plural form of “tsa`an” (H6813), which appears once as “[that] shall not be taken down” in verse 20 of Isa 33:20-24, 


“Look upon Zion, the city of our solemnities: thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle [’ohel:H168] [that] shall not be taken down [tsa`an:H6813]; not one of the stakes thereof shall ever be removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be broken. {21} But there the glorious LORD [will be] unto us a place of broad rivers [and] streams; wherein shall go no galley with oars, neither shall gallant ship pass thereby. {22} For the LORD [is] our judge, the LORD [is] our lawgiver, the LORD [is] our king; he will save us. {23} Thy tacklings are loosed; they could not well strengthen their mast, they could not spread the sail: then is the prey of a great spoil divided; the lame take the prey. {24} And the inhabitant shall not say, I am sick: the people that dwell therein [shall be] forgiven [their] iniquity.”


My reason for looking at this term first, is because it seems to be in direct opposition to what we just read in Jeremiah 10:20. The way to understand this dichotomy is to recognize that Jeremiah 10:20 is speaking of God abandoning His formerly divine organism - the New Testament churches. On the contrary, Isaiah 33:20-24 is speaking about the eternal Bride of Christ .


On that wonderful note, we will have to stop here today, and Lord willing, continue our investigation of Judges 4 in our next study. 







Judges 4 - Part 16

Air Date: June 14, 2017


“And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon. {14} And Deborah said unto Barak, Up; for this [is] the day in which the LORD hath delivered Sisera into thine hand: is not the LORD gone out before thee? So Barak went down from mount Tabor, and ten thousand men after him.”


Unto The Plain [’elown:H436] Of Zaanaim, [Tsa`ananniym:H6815] (Cont.)


In our last study we left off at the word “unto the plain” (’elown:H436) in Judges 4:11. This term for  “plain” is also used in eight other references to describe various plains in the land of Israel. As I mentioned previously, “Zaanaim” (Tsa`ananniym:H6815) is the plural form of “tsa`an” (H6813), which appears only once as “[that] shall not be taken down” in verse 20 of Isa 33:20-24, referring the the eternal Kingdom of God: 


“Look upon Zion, the city of our solemnities: thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle [’ohel:H168] [that] shall not be taken down [tsa`an:H6813]; not one of the stakes thereof shall ever be removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be broken. {21} But there the glorious LORD [will be] unto us a place of broad rivers [and] streams; wherein shall go no galley with oars, neither shall gallant ship pass thereby. {22} For the LORD [is] our judge, the LORD [is] our lawgiver, the LORD [is] our king; he will save us. {23} Thy tacklings are loosed; they could not well strengthen their mast, they could not spread the sail: then is the prey of a great spoil divided; the lame take the prey. {24} And the inhabitant shall not say, I am sick: the people that dwell therein [shall be] forgiven [their] iniquity.”


This helps us greatly to again see why Heber had separated himself from the Kenites (who are related to Cain parabolically), and in doing so he - like Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob before him, and all of God’s elect -  “pitched his tent” in the “plain” “...that shall not be taken down…,” which is alluding to something strong and enduring, which is characteristic of the eternal relationship between God and His Bride as Revelation 21:1-3 wonderfully  declares,


“And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea. {2} And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. {3} And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle [skene:G4633] of God [is] with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, [and be] their God.”  


The permanence and majesty of the Kingdom of God is also magnificently extolled in Psalm 145:1-21,


“[David's [Psalm] of praise.] I will extol thee, my God, O king; and I will bless thy name for ever and ever. {2} Every day will I bless thee; and I will praise thy name for ever and ever. {3} Great [is] the LORD, and greatly to be praised; and his greatness [is] unsearchable. {4} One generation shall praise thy works to another, and shall declare thy mighty acts. {5} I will speak of the glorious honour of thy majesty, and of thy wondrous works. {6} And [men] shall speak of the might of thy terrible acts: and I will declare thy greatness. {7} They shall abundantly utter the memory of thy great goodness, and shall sing of thy righteousness. {8} The LORD [is] gracious, and full of compassion; slow to anger, and of great mercy. {9} The LORD [is] good to all: and his tender mercies [are] over all his works. {10} All thy works shall praise thee, O LORD; and thy saints shall bless thee. {11} They shall speak of the glory of thy kingdom, and talk of thy power; {12} To make known to the sons of men his mighty acts, and the glorious majesty of his kingdom. {13} Thy kingdom [is] an everlasting kingdom, and thy dominion [endureth] throughout all generations. {14} The LORD upholdeth all that fall, and raiseth up all [those that be] bowed down. {15} The eyes of all wait upon thee; and thou givest them their meat in due season. {16} Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing. {17} The LORD [is] righteous in all his ways, and holy in all his works. {18} The LORD [is] nigh unto all them that call upon him, to all that call upon him in truth. {19} He will fulfil the desire of them that fear him: he also will hear their cry, and will save them. {20} The LORD preserveth all them that love him: but all the wicked will he destroy. {21} My mouth shall speak the praise of the LORD: and let all flesh bless his holy name for ever and ever.”


As we live in this prolonged “day of judgment,” when God has indeed separated the “sheep from the goats,” we can testify to the reality of verse 20: “The LORD preserveth all them that love him: but all the wicked will he destroy.”


Judges 4:12 - And They Shewed Sisera That Barak The Son Of Abinoam Was Gone Up To Mount Tabor

Next we come to Judges 4:12 which reveals: “And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor.” We have already considered most of these terms in our previous lesson, except for the expression, “And they shewed” (nagad:H5046), so we won’t cover that material again. Keep in mind that Barak’s (Baraq:H1301) name is identical to “lightning” (baraq:H1300) and he is the son of “of Abinoam” (’Abiyno`am:H42), a compound word signifying, “father of delight;” Barak hails from Kedesh or Kedeshnaphtali (Qedesh:H6943), which is identical to “qadash” (H6942), meaning to “hallow” or “sanctify;” so we could say that he resides in a place that is “set apart,” or “holy.” All of these details indicate that he represents the Lord Jesus Christ, even as Sisera (Ciycera:H5156) represents Satan.


And They Shewed [nagad:H5046]


Let’s consider the word, “And they shewed” (nagad:H5046), found in verse 12, “And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor.”  H5046 is a word that we have not encountered so far in our Judges study, and it is primarily rendered as “tell,” “declare,” and “shew.” Here are a few ways in which God utilizes this term:


In Genesis 3:11, it is translated as “told,” as God confronts Adam regarding his sin: “And he [God] said, Who told [nagad:H5046] thee [Adam] that thou [wast] naked? Hast thou eaten of the tree, whereof I commanded thee that thou shouldest not eat?”


Verse 24 of Genesis  41:24-25 finds Pharaoh explaining his dreams to Joseph, in which this word is rendered as, “ but [there was] none that could declare”: “And the thin ears devoured the seven good ears: and I told [this] unto the magicians; but [there was] none that could declare [nagad:H5046] [it] to me. {25} And Joseph said unto Pharaoh, The dream of Pharaoh [is] one: God hath shewed Pharaoh what he [is] about to do.”


In Joshua 2:14, and 20, it is rendered as “if ye utter,” and “and if thou utter” respectively: “And the men [i.e., the spies] answered her [Rahab], Our life for yours, if ye utter [nagad:H5046] not this our business. And it shall be, when the LORD hath given us the land, that we will deal kindly and truly with thee. ... {20} And if thou utter [nagad:H5046]  this our business, then we will be quit of thine oath which thou hast made us to swear.”


The most occurrences (14!) of this term appear in the account of Samson in Judges 14:2, 6, 9, 12-17, and 19, and is translated in these ways: “told,” “declare,” and “expound”: “And he came up, and told [nagad:H5046]  his father and his mother, and said, I have seen a woman in Timnath of the daughters of the Philistines: now therefore get her for me to wife. ... {6} And the Spirit of the LORD came mightily upon him, and he rent him as he would have rent a kid, and [he had] nothing in his hand: but he told [nagad:H5046]  not his father or his mother what he had done. ... {9} And he took thereof in his hands, and went on eating, and came to his father and mother, and he gave them, and they did eat: but he told [nagad:H5046] not them that he had taken the honey out of the carcase of the lion. ... {12} And Samson said unto them, I will now put forth a riddle unto you: if ye can certainly [nagad:H5046] declare [nagad:H5046]  it me within the seven days of the feast, and find [it] out, then I will give you thirty sheets and thirty change of garments: {13} But if ye cannot declare [nagad:H5046] [it] me, then shall ye give me thirty sheets and thirty change of garments. And they said unto him, Put forth thy riddle, that we may hear it. {14} And he said unto them, Out of the eater came forth meat, and out of the strong came forth sweetness. And they could not in three days expound [nagad:H5046]  the riddle. {15} And it came to pass on the seventh day, that they said unto Samson's wife, Entice thy husband, that he may declare [nagad:H5046]  unto us the riddle, lest we burn thee and thy father's house with fire: have ye called us to take that we have? [is it] not [so]? {16} And Samson's wife wept before him, and said, Thou dost but hate me, and lovest me not: thou hast put forth a riddle unto the children of my people, and hast not told [nagad:H5046]  [it] me. And he said unto her, Behold, I have not told [nagad:H5046]  [it] my father nor my mother, and shall I tell [nagad:H5046]  [it] thee? {17} And she wept before him the seven days, while their feast lasted: and it came to pass on the seventh day, that he told [nagad:H5046] her, because she lay sore upon him: and she told [nagad:H5046] the riddle to the children of her people. ... {19} And the Spirit of the LORD came upon him, and he went down to Ashkelon, and slew thirty men of them, and took their spoil, and gave change of garments unto them which expounded [nagad:H5046]  the riddle. And his anger was kindled, and he went up to his father's house.”


Judges 4:13-14


We have already considered most of the words in verses 13 and 14, but there are two words, “gone out” and “before thee,” in the phrase, “is not the LORD gone out before thee?” in verse 14 that we want to now investigate. I’ll read both verses again, as we see the preparation for this upcoming battle which spiritually is taking place between the Kingdom of God (headed up by Barak and Deborah) and the kingdom of Satan (headed up by Sisera and his army, including his 900 “chariots of iron”): 


“And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon. {14} And Deborah said unto Barak, Up; for this [is] the day in which the LORD hath delivered Sisera into thine hand: is not the LORD gone out before thee? So Barak went down from mount Tabor, and ten thousand men after him.”


Up [quwm:H6965] For… The LORD Hath Delivered Sisera Into Thine Hand


Before looking at these two terms, “gone out” and “before thee,” I want to mention one thing. Deborah reminds Barak of God’s deliverance in verse 14, as we have seen previously throughout the book of Judges as God “raised”  up these various judges to rescue Israel from their heathen oppressers. This term “raised” is the same word translated “Up” in verse 14, and you might recall that we saw it earlier in some of our previous lessons in Judges 2 and 3, as the following passages reveal:


Judges 2:16 and 18 state: “Nevertheless the LORD raised up [quwm:H6965] judges, which delivered them out of the hand of those that spoiled them. ... {18} And when the LORD raised [quwm:H6965]them up judges, then the LORD was with the judge, and delivered them out of the hand of their enemies all the days of the judge: for it repented the LORD because of their groanings by reason of them that oppressed them and vexed them.”


Judges 3:9 and 15 further add: “And when the children of Israel cried unto the LORD, the LORD raised up [quwm:H6965] a deliverer to the children of Israel, who delivered them, [even] Othniel the son of Kenaz, Caleb's younger brother. ... {15} But when the children of Israel cried unto the LORD, the LORD raised them up [quwm:H6965] a deliverer, Ehud the son of Gera, a Benjamite, a man lefthanded: and by him the children of Israel sent a present unto Eglon the king of Moab.”


Is Not The LORD [Yehovah:H3068] Gone Out [yatsa’:H3318] Before [paniym:H6440] Thee?


Deborah also reminds Barak that God has already gome before them to secure their victory in this intense spiritual battle, as we have seen in our prior studies. Here are some illustrations of how God utilizes these two terms, “gone out” (yatsa’:H3318) and “before” (paniym:H6440):


2 Samuel  5:24 maintains, “And let it be, when thou hearest the sound of a going in the tops of the mulberry trees, that then thou shalt bestir thyself: for then shall the LORD go out  [yatsa’:H3318] before [paniym:H6440]  thee, to smite the host of the Philistines.”


2 Chronicles 20:17 likewise adds,, “Ye shall not [need] to fight in this [battle]: set yourselves, stand ye [still], and see the salvation of the LORD with you, O Judah and Jerusalem: fear not, nor be dismayed; to morrow go out [yatsa’:H3318] against [paniym:H6440] them: for the LORD [will be] with you.”


Lastly, Psa 68:7 records, “O God, when thou wentest forth [yatsa’:H3318] before [paniym:H6440] thy people, when thou didst march through the wilderness; Selah:”


We next read the following in the last phrase of verse 14: 


“So Barak went down [yarad:H3381] from mount [har:H2022] Tabor, and ten thousand men after him,” 


This is similar to what we saw in Judges 3:27, in which Ehud did the same thing:


“And it came to pass, when he was come, that he blew a trumpet in the mountain of Ephraim, and the children of Israel went down  [yarad:H3381] with him from the mount [har:H2022], and he before them.”


In both of these portraits, we note that Ehud and Barak (who both typify Christ) are leading their respective armies (picturing God’s elect in “the day of judgment”) to certain victory.


Lord willing, in our next study we will see what happens next in this most interesting historical parable.

Judges 4 - Part 17

Air Date: June 16, 2017


 “And the LORD discomfited Sisera, and all [his] chariots, and all [his] host, with the edge of the sword before Barak; so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet. {16} But Barak pursued after the chariots, and after the host, unto Harosheth of the Gentiles: and all the host of Sisera fell upon the edge of the sword; [and] there was not a man left.”


A General Overview Of The Battle


We are down to verses 15 and 16 of Judges 4, and God gives us a general overview of this battle between Sisera (typifying Satan) and his army, and Barak (who represents the Lord Jesus Christ) and His forces, comprised of men from the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali. Starting with verse 17 to the end of the chapter the focus will be on two people - Sisera and Jael, who is Heber’s wife. But for now let us concentrate on the verses at hand, beginning with the first phrase,


And The LORD [Yehovah:H3068] Discomfited [hamam:H2000] Sisera [Ciycera:H5156] And All [His] Chariots [rekeb:H7393]


Since we have already considered the term for “and all [his] chariots,” I won’t belabor the point. However the other two words, “and the LORD” and “discomfited” only appear here in Judges 4, and four other chapters; in each of them judgment is in view. The first entry is found in verse 24 of Exodus 14:21-31, in which God employs these terms as: “the LORD” and “and troubled”:  


“And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the LORD caused the sea to go [back] by a strong east wind all that night, and made the sea dry [land], and the waters were divided. {22} And the children of Israel went into the midst of the sea upon the dry [ground]: and the waters [were] a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. {23} And the Egyptians pursued, and went in after them to the midst of the sea, [even] all Pharaoh's horses, his chariots, and his horsemen.{24} And it came to pass, that in the morning watch the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] looked unto the host of the Egyptians through the pillar of fire and of the cloud, and troubled [hamam:H2000] the host of the Egyptians, {25} And took off their chariot wheels, that they drave them heavily: so that the Egyptians said, Let us flee from the face of Israel; for the LORD fighteth for them against the Egyptians. {26} And the LORD said unto Moses, Stretch out thine hand over the sea, that the waters may come again upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots, and upon their horsemen. {27} And Moses stretched forth his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to his strength when the morning appeared; and the Egyptians fled against it; and the LORD overthrew the Egyptians in the midst of the sea. {28} And the waters returned, and covered the chariots, and the horsemen, [and] all the host of Pharaoh that came into the sea after them; there remained not so much as one of them. {29} But the children of Israel walked upon dry [land] in the midst of the sea; and the waters [were] a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. {30} Thus the LORD saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore. {31} And Israel saw that great work which the LORD did upon the Egyptians: and the people feared the LORD, and believed the LORD, and his servant Moses.”


Verse 15 of Deuteronomy 2:13-16 translates these two words as “of the LORD” and “was against them, to destroy them”:  “Now rise up, [said I], and get you over the brook Zered. And we went over the brook Zered. {14} And the space in which we came from Kadeshbarnea, until we were come over the brook Zered, [was] thirty and eight years; until all the generation of the men of war were wasted out from among the host, as the LORD sware unto them. {15} For indeed the hand of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]  was against them, to destroy [hamam:H2000] them from among the host, until they were consumed. {16}  So it came to pass, when all the men of war were consumed and dead from among the people,”


In verse 10 of Joshua 10:6-14, these terms are expressed as “And the LORD” and “discomfited”: “And the men of Gibeon sent unto Joshua to the camp to Gilgal, saying, Slack not thy hand from thy servants; come up to us quickly, and save us, and help us: for all the kings of the Amorites that dwell in the mountains are gathered together against us. {7} So Joshua ascended from Gilgal, he, and all the people of war with him, and all the mighty men of valour. {8} And the LORD said unto Joshua, Fear them not: for I have delivered them into thine hand; there shall not a man of them stand before thee. {9} Joshua therefore came unto them suddenly, [and] went up from Gilgal all night. {10} And the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]  discomfited [hamam:H2000] them before Israel, and slew them with a great slaughter at Gibeon, and chased them along the way that goeth up to Bethhoron, and smote them to Azekah, and unto Makkedah. {11} And it came to pass, as they fled from before Israel, [and] were in the going down to Bethhoron, that the LORD cast down great stones from heaven upon them unto Azekah, and they died: [they were] more which died with hailstones than [they] whom the children of Israel slew with the sword. {12} Then spake Joshua to the LORD in the day when the LORD delivered up the Amorites before the children of Israel, and he said in the sight of Israel, Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon; and thou, Moon, in the valley of Ajalon. {13} And the sun stood still, and the moon stayed, until the people had avenged themselves upon their enemies. [Is] not this written in the book of Jasher? So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down about a whole day. {14} And there was no day like that before it or after it, that the LORD hearkened unto the voice of a man: for the LORD fought for Israel.”


The last reference is found in verse 10 of 1 Samuel 7:1-15, in which these two words appear as “but the LORD” and  “and discomfited them”: And the men of Kirjathjearim came, and fetched up the ark of the LORD, and brought it into the house of Abinadab in the hill, and sanctified Eleazar his son to keep the ark of the LORD. {2} And it came to pass, while the ark abode in Kirjathjearim, that the time was long; for it was twenty years: and all the house of Israel lamented after the LORD. {3} And Samuel spake unto all the house of Israel, saying, If ye do return unto the LORD with all your hearts, [then] put away the strange gods and Ashtaroth from among you, and prepare your hearts unto the LORD, and serve him only: and he will deliver you out of the hand of the Philistines. {4} Then the children of Israel did put away Baalim and Ashtaroth, and served the LORD only. {5} And Samuel said, Gather all Israel to Mizpeh, and I will pray for you unto the LORD. {6} And they gathered together to Mizpeh, and drew water, and poured [it] out before the LORD, and fasted on that day, and said there, We have sinned against the LORD. And Samuel judged the children of Israel in Mizpeh. {7} And when the Philistines heard that the children of Israel were gathered together to Mizpeh, the lords of the Philistines went up against Israel. And when the children of Israel heard [it], they were afraid of the Philistines. {8} And the children of Israel said to Samuel, Cease not to cry unto the LORD our God for us, that he will save us out of the hand of the Philistines. {9} And Samuel took a sucking lamb, and offered [it for] a burnt offering wholly unto the LORD: and Samuel cried unto the LORD for Israel; and the LORD heard him. {10} And as Samuel was offering up the burnt offering, the Philistines drew near to battle against Israel: but the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]  thundered with a great thunder on that day upon the Philistines, and discomfited them [hamam:H2000]; and they were smitten before Israel. {11} And the men of Israel went out of Mizpeh, and pursued the Philistines, and smote them, until [they came] under Bethcar. {12} Then Samuel took a stone, and set [it] between Mizpeh and Shen, and called the name of it Ebenezer, saying, Hitherto hath the LORD helped us. {13} So the Philistines were subdued, and they came no more into the coast of Israel: and the hand of the LORD was against the Philistines all the days of Samuel. {14} And the cities which the Philistines had taken from Israel were restored to Israel, from Ekron even unto Gath; and the coasts thereof did Israel deliver out of the hands of the Philistines. And there was peace between Israel and the Amorites. {15} And Samuel judged Israel all the days of his life.”


And All [His] Host [machaneh:H4264]


The next word that we want to investigate is one that we have encountered before, and is translated in a variety of ways, but predominantly, as “camp,” “host,” and “company.” Most recently we ran across this word in our discussion in Part 15, having to do with Heber in Judges 4:11, in which we learned that after separating from the Kenites, he “...pitched [natah:H5186] his tent [’ohel:H168] unto the plain of Zaanaim.” As we considered the verses that contain these two Hebrew expressions, “pitched” and “tent,” we discovered Exodus 33:7, in which the word “tent” or “tabernacle” was repeated three times in this one verse, and the word “host” or “the camp” was the last word found in this citation:


“And Moses took the tabernacle [’ohel:H168], and pitched [natah:H5186] it without the camp, afar off from the camp, and called it the Tabernacle [’ohel:H168] of the congregation. And it came to pass, [that] every one which sought the LORD went out unto the tabernacle [’ohel:H168]  of the congregation, which [was] without [chuwts:H2351 - “outside] the camp.”[machaneh:H4264]


The word “camp” (machaneh:H4264) also surfaces twice in Exodus 14:20, “And it came between the camp [machaneh:H4264] of the Egyptians and the camp [machaneh:H4264]

 of Israel; and it was a cloud and darkness [to them], but it gave light by night [to these]: so that the one came not near the other all the night.”


In Deuteronomy 23:14, God lays down a law relating to the camp; in other passages where this law was violated, God brought judgment as was the case with Aachan, or Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, for example: “For the LORD thy God walketh in the midst of thy camp [machaneh:H4264] to deliver thee, and to give up thine enemies before thee; therefore shall thy camp [machaneh:H4264] be holy: that he see no unclean thing in thee, and turn away from thee.”


One of the chapters where this term is used extensively is in the historical parable found in Judges 7 concerning Gideon, which, if God allows us to, we will one day be able to examine in some detail; I’ll read verses 1, 8-11, 13-15, 17-19, and 21-22: 


Then Jerubbaal, who [is] Gideon, and all the people that [were] with him, rose up early, and pitched beside the well of Harod: so that the host [machaneh:H4264]  of the Midianites were on the north side of them, by the hill of Moreh, in the valley. ... {8} So the people took victuals in their hand, and their trumpets: and he sent all [the rest of] Israel every man unto his tent, and retained those three hundred men: and the host [machaneh:H4264]  of Midian was beneath him in the valley. {9} And it came to pass the same night, that the LORD said unto him, Arise, get thee down unto the host [machaneh:H4264] ; for I have delivered it into thine hand. {10} But if thou fear to go down, go thou with Phurah thy servant down to the host [machaneh:H4264] : {11} And thou shalt hear what they say; and afterward shall thine hands be strengthened to go down unto the host. [machaneh:H4264]  Then went he down with Phurah his servant unto the outside of the armed men that [were] in the host. [machaneh:H4264]  ... {13} And when Gideon was come, behold, [there was] a man that told a dream unto his fellow, and said, Behold, I dreamed a dream, and, lo, a cake of barley bread tumbled into the host [machaneh:H4264] of Midian, and came unto a tent, and smote it that it fell, and overturned it, that the tent lay along. {14} And his fellow answered and said, This [is] nothing else save the sword of Gideon the son of Joash, a man of Israel: [for] into his hand hath God delivered Midian, and all the host. [machaneh:H4264] {15} And it was [so], when Gideon heard the telling of the dream, and the interpretation thereof, that he worshipped, and returned into the host of Israel, and said, Arise; for the LORD hath delivered into your hand the host of Midian. ... {17} And he said unto them, Look on me, and do likewise: and, behold, when I come to the outside of the camp [machaneh:H4264], it shall be [that], as I do, so shall ye do. {18} When I blow with a trumpet, I and all that [are] with me, then blow ye the trumpets also on every side of all the camp [machaneh:H4264], and say, [The sword] of the LORD, and of Gideon. {19} So Gideon, and the hundred men that [were] with him, came unto the outside of the camp [machaneh:H4264] in the beginning of the middle watch; and they had but newly set the watch: and they blew the trumpets, and brake the pitchers that [were] in their hands. ... {21} And they stood every man in his place round about the camp [machaneh:H4264]: and all the host [machaneh:H4264] ran, and cried, and fled. {22} and the three hundred blew the trumpets, and the LORD set every man's sword against his fellow, even throughout all the host [machaneh:H4264]: and the host [machaneh:H4264] fled to Bethshittah in Zererath, [and] to the border of Abelmeholah, unto Tabbath.”


In 1 Chronicles 12:22, we find a curious statement, in which both the words “day” as well as “host” are repeated: “For at [that] time day by day there came to David to help him, until [it was] a great host [machaneh:H4264], like the host [machaneh:H4264] of God.”


Psalm 27:3 includes this expression as “Though an host”:  “Though an host [machaneh:H4264] should encamp against me, my heart shall not fear: though war should rise against me, in this [will] I [be] confident.”


Lastly, and speaking of our current day,  Joel 2:11 renders this word as “for his camp”:  “And the LORD shall utter his voice before his army: for his camp [machaneh:H4264]  [is] very great: for [he is] strong that executeth his word: for the day of the LORD [is] great and very terrible; and who can abide it?”


And The LORD discomfited...With The Edge [peh:H6310] Of The Sword [chereb:H2719] Before [paniym:H6440] Barak [Baraq:H1301]


In the next phrase, we notice the means which God used to “discomfit” (i.e., “destroy” or “trouble”) Sisera and his army, namely, “with the edge” (peh:H6310) and “of the sword” (chereb:H2719). You might recall seeing these two words together in Judges 1:8 and 25,


“Now the children of Judah had fought against Jerusalem, and had taken it, and smitten it with the edge [peh:H6310] of the sword [chereb:H2719], and set the city on fire. ... {25} And when he shewed them the entrance into the city, they smote the city with the edge [peh:H6310]  of the sword [chereb:H2719]; but they let go the man and all his family.”


As we continue our investigation into the book of Judges, these two terms will surface again in some of the later chapters, if God allows us to get there; all together these two words are found 37 times in the Old Testament. They also are found in verse 20 of Isaiah 1, which is a chapter that deals with God’s judgment on his formerly divine organism - the end-time institutional churches and denominations - typified here by “Judah and Jerusalem”:


“The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, [and] Hezekiah, kings of Judah.{2} Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth: for the LORD hath spoken, I have nourished and brought up children, and they have rebelled against me. {3} The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib: [but] Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. {4} Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, a seed of evildoers, children that are corrupters: they have forsaken the LORD, they have provoked the Holy One of Israel unto anger, they are gone away backward. {5} Why should ye be stricken any more? ye will revolt more and more: the whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint. {6} From the sole of the foot even unto the head [there is] no soundness in it; [but] wounds, and bruises, and putrifying sores: they have not been closed, neither bound up, neither mollified with ointment. {7} Your country [is] desolate, your cities [are] burned with fire: your land, strangers devour it in your presence, and [it is] desolate, as overthrown by strangers. {8}And the daughter of Zion is left as a cottage in a vineyard, as a lodge in a garden of cucumbers, as a besieged city. {9} Except the LORD of hosts had left unto us a very small remnant, we should have been as Sodom, [and] we should have been like unto Gomorrah. {10} Hear the word of the LORD, ye rulers of Sodom; give ear unto the law of our God, ye people of Gomorrah. {11} To what purpose [is] the multitude of your sacrifices unto me? saith the LORD: I am full of the burnt offerings of rams, and the fat of fed beasts; and I delight not in the blood of bullocks, or of lambs, or of he goats. {12} When ye come to appear before me, who hath required this at your hand, to tread my courts? {13} Bring no more vain oblations; incense is an abomination unto me; the new moons and sabbaths, the calling of assemblies, I cannot away with; [it is] iniquity, even the solemn meeting. {14} Your new moons and your appointed feasts my soul hateth: they are a trouble unto me; I am weary to bear [them]. {15} And when ye spread forth your hands, I will hide mine eyes from you: yea, when ye make many prayers, I will not hear: your hands are full of blood. {16} Wash you, make you clean; put away the evil of your doings from before mine eyes; cease to do evil; {17} Learn to do well; seek judgment, relieve the oppressed, judge the fatherless, plead for the widow. {18} Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool. {19} If ye be willing and obedient, ye shall eat the good of the land: {20} But if ye refuse and rebel, ye shall be devoured with the sword [chereb:H2719]: for the mouth [peh:H6310]  of the LORD hath spoken [it].”


Lord willing, in our next study we will learn what happened next to Sisera in this intriguing historical parable, as we examine the last phrase in Judges 4:15, “...so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet.”












Judges 4 - Part 18

Air Date: June 19, 2017


 “And the LORD discomfited Sisera, and all [his] chariots, and all [his] host, with the edge of the sword before Barak; so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet. {16} But Barak pursued after the chariots, and after the host, unto Harosheth of the Gentiles: and all the host of Sisera fell upon the edge of the sword; [and] there was not a man left.”


We have arrived at the last phrase in Judges 4:15, and we are in the middle of this battle between Sisera (representing Satan and his kingdom) and Barak and Deborah (who typify the Lord Jesus Christ and the Word of God, and His Kingdom): “...so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet.”


Lighted Down [yarad:H3381] Off [His] Chariot [merkabah:H4818] 


Incidentally, the word for chariot in this verse is different and unrelated to the other Hebrew word for “chariot” (rekeb:H7393), which God has employed five other times in this chapter.  The two terms, “lighted down” (yarad:H3381) and “off [his] chariot” (merkabah:H4818) are only found together in one other very significant passage - verse 22 of Haggai 2:20-23,


“And again the word of the LORD came unto Haggai in the four and twentieth [day] of the month, saying, {21} Speak to Zerubbabel, governor of Judah, saying, I will shake the heavens and the earth; {22} And I will overthrow the throne of kingdoms, and I will destroy the strength of the kingdoms of the heathen; and I will overthrow the chariots [merkabah:H4818], and those that ride in them; and the horses and their riders shall come down [yarad:H3381], every one by the sword of his brother. {23} In that day, saith the LORD of hosts, will I take thee, O Zerubbabel, my servant, the son of Shealtiel, saith the LORD, and will make thee as a signet: for I have chosen thee, saith the LORD of hosts.”


As you can see from the context, our current “day of judgment” is very much in view. Notice the four “I will” statements that God is declaring in no uncertain terms:


  • “...I will shake the heavens and the earth...”
  • “...I will overthrow the throne of kingdoms…”
  • “...I will destroy the strength of the kingdoms of the heathen…”
  • “...I will overthrow the chariots, and those that ride in them; and the horses and their riders shall come down…” 

One immediately recognizes that God is vanquishing the “throne of kingdoms” and the “strength of the kingdoms of the heathen,” which would also include their principal weapons - their chariots - as well as the chariot riders and their horses. This is highlighting the victory over Satan and his kingdom on May 21, 2011. You can also see that this is the case with Sisera as well, even though he escapes (temporarily) - as we shall see - to what he considers a safe haven.


The ominous declaration, “...I will shake the heavens and the earth…” is found in Haggai 2:6 as well as in Isaiah 13:13, respectively:


“For thus saith the LORD of hosts; Yet once, it [is] a little while, and I will shake the heavens, and the earth, and the sea, and the dry [land];”


Therefore I will shake the heavens, and the earth shall remove out of her place, in the wrath of the LORD of hosts, and in the day of his fierce anger.”


Verses 26-27 of Hebrew 12:18-29 quotes Isaiah 13:13, and offers a very revealing commentary too:  “For ye are not come unto the mount that might be touched, and that burned with fire, nor unto blackness, and darkness, and tempest, {19} And the sound of a trumpet, and the voice of words; which [voice] they that heard intreated that the word should not be spoken to them any more: {20} (For they could not endure that which was commanded, And if so much as a beast touch the mountain, it shall be stoned, or thrust through with a dart: {21} And so terrible was the sight, [that] Moses said, I exceedingly fear and quake:) {22} But ye are come unto mount Sion, and unto the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to an innumerable company of angels, {23} To the general assembly and church of the firstborn, which are written in heaven, and to God the Judge of all, and to the spirits of just men made perfect, {24} And to Jesus the mediator of the new covenant, and to the blood of sprinkling, that speaketh better things than [that of] Abel. {25} See that ye refuse not him that speaketh. For if they escaped not who refused him that spake on earth, much more [shall not] we [escape], if we turn away from him that [speaketh] from heaven: {26} Whose voice then shook the earth: but now he hath promised, saying, Yet once more I shake not the earth only, but also heaven. {27} And this [word], Yet once more, signifieth the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things that are made, that those things which cannot be shaken may remain. {28} Wherefore we receiving a kingdom which cannot be moved, let us have grace, whereby we may serve God acceptably with reverence and godly fear: {29} For our God [is] a consuming fire.”


And Fled Away [nuwc:H5127] On His Feet [regel:H7272]


In the next phrase we read that Sisera “...fled away [nuwc:H5127] on this feet [regel:7272]. These two terms also appear in Judges 4:17, underscoring this important detail:


“Howbeit Sisera fled away [nuwc:H5127] on his feet [regel:7272] to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite.”


Earlier in Judges 1:6, we ran across these two words, which are rendered “fled” and “and his great toes” with respect to one of the Canaanite kings, Adonibezek, who reigned over the city of Bezek; I’ll read verses 3-7,


“And Judah said unto Simeon his brother, Come up with me into my lot, that we may fight against the Canaanites; and I likewise will go with thee into thy lot. So Simeon went with him. {4} And Judah went up; and the LORD delivered the Canaanites and the Perizzites into their hand: and they slew of them in Bezek ten thousand men. {5} And they found Adonibezek in Bezek: and they fought against him, and they slew the Canaanites and the Perizzites. {6} But Adonibezek fled [nuwc:H5127]; and they pursued after him, and caught him, and cut off his thumbs and his great toes. [regel:7272] {7} And Adonibezek said, Threescore and ten kings, having their thumbs and their great toes cut off, gathered [their meat] under my table: as I have done, so God hath requited me. And they brought him to Jerusalem, and there he died.”


But Barak [Baraq:H1301] Pursued [radaph:H7291] After [’achar:H310] The Chariots [rekeb:H7393] And After The Host [machaneh:H4264]


We have already discussed the Hebrew words “Barak” and “host” in some of our other lessons, so let’s consider the two terms, “pursued” (radaph:H7291) and more frequent word (in this chapter) for “chariots” (rekeb:H7393). Curiously, these two expressions appear in four other passages that all have to do with the Egyptian army trying to overcome the Israelites in the Red Sea, in which these words are all translated as “pursued” and “chariots”:


Exodus 14:9 and 23 declares, “But the Egyptians pursued [radaph:H7291] after them, all the horses [and] chariots [rekeb:H7393] of Pharaoh, and his horsemen, and his army, and overtook them encamping by the sea, beside Pihahiroth, before Baalzephon. ... {23} And the Egyptians pursued, and went in after them to the midst of the sea, [even] all Pharaoh's horses, his chariots, and his horsemen.”


Deu 11:4 likewise affirms: “And what he did unto the army of Egypt, unto their horses, and to their chariots [rekeb:H7393]; how he made the water of the Red sea to overflow them as they pursued [radaph:H7291] after you, and [how] the LORD hath destroyed them unto this day;”


Joshua 24:6 also acknowledges the same: “And I brought your fathers out of Egypt: and ye came unto the sea; and the Egyptians pursued [radaph:H7291] after your fathers with chariots [rekeb:H7393]  and horsemen unto the Red sea.”


This repetitition serves to underscore the magnitude of this miraculous event. Undoubtedly, this was the greatest display of God’s power in all the Old Testament as it spiritually highlights the far greater miracle of the “new birth” for all of God’s elect which it typifies - superseding all of the 10 preceding plagues. It was so unprecedented in its power and scope, that news of it spread to many of the surrounding nations by word of mouth alone, even though it happened 40 years earlier. Deuteronomy 4:32-40 and Joshua 2:9-11 dramatically concur:


“For ask now of the days that are past, which were before thee, since the day that God created man upon the earth, and [ask] from the one side of heaven unto the other, whether there hath been [any such thing] as this great thing [is], or hath been heard like it? {33} Did [ever] people hear the voice of God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live? {34} Or hath God assayed to go [and] take him a nation from the midst of [another] nation, by temptations, by signs, and by wonders, and by war, and by a mighty hand, and by a stretched out arm, and by great terrors, according to all that the LORD your God did for you in Egypt before your eyes? {35} Unto thee it was shewed, that thou mightest know that the LORD he [is] God; [there is] none else beside him. {36} Out of heaven he made thee to hear his voice, that he might instruct thee: and upon earth he shewed thee his great fire; and thou heardest his words out of the midst of the fire. {37} And because he loved thy fathers, therefore he chose their seed after them, and brought thee out in his sight with his mighty power out of Egypt; {38} To drive out nations from before thee greater and mightier than thou [art], to bring thee in, to give thee their land [for] an inheritance, as [it is] this day. {39} Know therefore this day, and consider [it] in thine heart, that the LORD he [is] God in heaven above, and upon the earth beneath: [there is] none else. {40} Thou shalt keep therefore his statutes, and his commandments, which I command thee this day, that it may go well with thee, and with thy children after thee, and that thou mayest prolong [thy] days upon the earth, which the LORD thy God giveth thee, for ever.”


“And she said unto the men, I know that the LORD hath given you the land, and that your terror is fallen upon us, and that all the inhabitants of the land faint because of you. {10} For we have heard how the LORD dried up the water of the Red sea for you, when ye came out of Egypt; and what ye did unto the two kings of the Amorites, that [were] on the other side Jordan, Sihon and Og, whom ye utterly destroyed. {11} And as soon as we had heard [these things], our hearts did melt, neither did there remain any more courage in any man, because of you: for the LORD your God, he [is] God in heaven above, and in earth beneath.”


Additionally, the word “pursued” is primarly rendered as such, but the second most frequent way it is translated, is “persecuted,” as the following examples illustrate:


Deuteronomy 30:7 maintains, “And the LORD thy God will put all these curses upon thine enemies, and on them that hate thee, which persecuted [radaph:H7291] thee.”


Nehemiah 9:11 also reveals: “And thou didst divide the sea before them, so that they went through the midst of the sea on the dry land; and their persecutors [radaph:H7291] thou threwest into the deeps, as a stone into the mighty waters.”


Psalm 7:1 further acknowledges: [Shiggaion of David, which he sang unto the LORD, concerning the words of Cush the Benjamite.] “O LORD my God, in thee do I put my trust: save me from all them that persecute [radaph:H7291]  me, and deliver me:”


Similarly, Psalm 31:15 also adds, “My times [are] in thy hand: deliver me from the hand of mine enemies, and from them that persecute [radaph:H7291] me.”


Unto Harosheth Of The Gentiles


Next we learn that Barak pursues the army - and not Sisera - to Harosheth of the Gentiles (or “nations”) - which spiritually would refer to all of those within Satan’s dominion, namely the non-elect. Perhaps Barak was reminded of Deborah’s counsel in Judges 4:9?


“And she said, I will surely go with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman. And Deborah arose, and went with Barak to Kedesh.”


In any event what transpires is summed up in the phrase,


Fell [naphal:H5307] Upon The Edge [peh:H6310] Of The Sword [chereb:H2719]


These three words only appear in two other places, besides here in Judges 4:16,





In Joshua 8:24 we read: “And it came to pass, when Israel had made an end of slaying all the inhabitants of Ai in the field, in the wilderness wherein they chased them, and when they were all fallen [naphal:H5307] on the edge [peh:H6310] of the sword [chereb:H2719], until they were consumed, that all the Israelites returned unto Ai, and smote it with the edge of the sword.”


And Job 1:15 refers to one of the trials that God allowed Job to be afflicted with: “And the Sabeans fell [naphal:H5307] [upon them], and took them away; yea, they have slain the servants with the edge  [peh:H6310] of the sword [chereb:H2719]; and I only am escaped alone to tell thee.”


Well, I’m afaid that we will have to stop here today, and pick this up in our next lesson, Lord willing.







Judges 4 - Part 19

Air Date: June 21, 2017


 “And the LORD discomfited Sisera, and all [his] chariots, and all [his] host, with the edge of the sword before Barak; so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet. {16} But Barak pursued after the chariots, and after the host, unto Harosheth of the Gentiles: and all the host of Sisera fell upon the edge of the sword; [and] there was not a man left. {17} Howbeit Sisera fled away on his feet to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite.”


And There Was Not A Man [’echad:H259] Left  [sha’ar:H7064]


We are learning more about the battle between Sisera and Barak, and the victory which God brought about for the Israelites, as we read in the last phrase of verse 16 concerning Sisera’s army: “...[and] there was not a man left.” These two terms appear in 9 citations; the following are some examples from the plagues of Egypt and the Red Sea crossing:


We find these two expressions in verse 31 of Exodus 8:20-32 regarding the plague of flies: “And the LORD said unto Moses, Rise up early in the morning, and stand before Pharaoh; lo, he cometh forth to the water; and say unto him, Thus saith the LORD, Let my people go, that they may serve me. {21} Else, if thou wilt not let my people go, behold, I will send swarms [of flies] upon thee, and upon thy servants, and upon thy people, and into thy houses: and the houses of the Egyptians shall be full of swarms [of flies], and also the ground whereon they [are]. {22} And I will sever in that day the land of Goshen, in which my people dwell, that no swarms [of flies] shall be there; to the end thou mayest know that I [am] the LORD in the midst of the earth. {23} And I will put a division between my people and thy people: to morrow shall this sign be. {24} And the LORD did so; and there came a grievous swarm [of flies] into the house of Pharaoh, and [into] his servants' houses, and into all the land of Egypt: the land was corrupted by reason of the swarm [of flies]. {25} And Pharaoh called for Moses and for Aaron, and said, Go ye, sacrifice to your God in the land. {26} And Moses said, It is not meet so to do; for we shall sacrifice the abomination of the Egyptians to the LORD our God: lo, shall we sacrifice the abomination of the Egyptians before their eyes, and will they not stone us? {27} We will go three days' journey into the wilderness, and sacrifice to the LORD our God, as he shall command us. {28} And Pharaoh said, I will let you go, that ye may sacrifice to the LORD your God in the wilderness; only ye shall not go very far away: intreat for me. {29} And Moses said, Behold, I go out from thee, and I will intreat the LORD that the swarms [of flies] may depart from Pharaoh, from his servants, and from his people, to morrow: but let not Pharaoh deal deceitfully any more in not letting the people go to sacrifice to the LORD. {30} And Moses went out from Pharaoh, and intreated the LORD. {31}And the LORD did according to the word of Moses; and he removed the swarms [of flies] from Pharaoh, from his servants, and from his people; there remained [sha’ar:H7064]  not one.”[’echad:H259] {32} And Pharaoh hardened his heart at this time also, neither would he let the people go.”


Likewise verse 19 of Exodus 10:1-20 contains these two terms as well; please note God’s purpose, which He revealed to Moses in the first two verses: “And the LORD said unto Moses, Go in unto Pharaoh: for I have hardened his heart, and the heart of his servants, that I might shew these my signs before him: {2} And that thou mayest tell in the ears of thy son, and of thy son's son, what things I have wrought in Egypt, and my signs which I have done among them; that ye may know how that I [am] the LORD. {3} And Moses and Aaron came in unto Pharaoh, and said unto him, Thus saith the LORD God of the Hebrews, How long wilt thou refuse to humble thyself before me? let my people go, that they may serve me. {4} Else, if thou refuse to let my people go, behold, to morrow will I bring the locusts into thy coast: {5} And they shall cover the face of the earth, that one cannot be able to see the earth: and they shall eat the residue of that which is escaped, which remaineth unto you from the hail, and shall eat every tree which groweth for you out of the field: {6 }And they shall fill thy houses, and the houses of all thy servants, and the houses of all the Egyptians; which neither thy fathers, nor thy fathers' fathers have seen, since the day that they were upon the earth unto this day. And he turned himself, and went out from Pharaoh. {7} And Pharaoh's servants said unto him, How long shall this man be a snare unto us? let the men go, that they may serve the LORD their God: knowest thou not yet that Egypt is destroyed? {8} And Moses and Aaron were brought again unto Pharaoh: and he said unto them, Go, serve the LORD your God: [but] who [are] they that shall go? {9} And Moses said, We will go with our young and with our old, with our sons and with our daughters, with our flocks and with our herds will we go; for we [must hold] a feast unto the LORD. {10} And he said unto them, Let the LORD be so with you, as I will let you go, and your little ones: look [to it]; for evil [is] before you. {11} Not so: go now ye [that are] men, and serve the LORD; for that ye did desire. And they were driven out from Pharaoh's presence. {12} And the LORD said unto Moses, Stretch out thine hand over the land of Egypt for the locusts, that they may come up upon the land of Egypt, and eat every herb of the land, [even] all that the hail hath left. {13} And Moses stretched forth his rod over the land of Egypt, and the LORD brought an east wind upon the land all that day, and all [that] night; [and] when it was morning, the east wind brought the locusts. {14} And the locusts went up over all the land of Egypt, and rested in all the coasts of Egypt: very grievous [were they]; before them there were no such locusts as they, neither after them shall be such. {15} For they covered the face of the whole earth, so that the land was darkened; and they did eat every herb of the land, and all the fruit of the trees which the hail had left: and there remained not any green thing in the trees, or in the herbs of the field, through all the land of Egypt. {16} Then Pharaoh called for Moses and Aaron in haste; and he said, I have sinned against the LORD your God, and against you. {17} Now therefore forgive, I pray thee, my sin only this once, and intreat the LORD your God, that he may take away from me this death only. {18} And he went out from Pharaoh, and intreated the LORD. {19} And the LORD turned a mighty strong west wind, which took away the locusts, and cast them into the Red sea; there remained [sha’ar:H7064] not one [’echad:H259] locust in all the coasts of Egypt.” {20} But the LORD hardened Pharaoh's heart, so that he would not let the children of Israel go.” 


Similarly, verse 28 of Exodus 14:9-31 also maintains: “But the Egyptians pursued after them, all the horses [and] chariots of Pharaoh, and his horsemen, and his army, and overtook them encamping by the sea, beside Pihahiroth, before Baalzephon. {10} And when Pharaoh drew nigh, the children of Israel lifted up their eyes, and, behold, the Egyptians marched after them; and they were sore afraid: and the children of Israel cried out unto the LORD. {11} And they said unto Moses, Because [there were] no graves in Egypt, hast thou taken us away to die in the wilderness? wherefore hast thou dealt thus with us, to carry us forth out of Egypt? {12} [Is] not this the word that we did tell thee in Egypt, saying, Let us alone, that we may serve the Egyptians? For [it had been] better for us to serve the Egyptians, than that we should die in the wilderness. {13} And Moses said unto the people, Fear ye not, stand still, and see the salvation of the LORD, which he will shew to you to day: for the Egyptians whom ye have seen to day, ye shall see them again no more for ever. {14} The LORD shall fight for you, and ye shall hold your peace. {15} And the LORD said unto Moses, Wherefore criest thou unto me? speak unto the children of Israel, that they go forward: {16} But lift thou up thy rod, and stretch out thine hand over the sea, and divide it: and the children of Israel shall go on dry [ground] through the midst of the sea. {17} And I, behold, I will harden the hearts of the Egyptians, and they shall follow them: and I will get me honour upon Pharaoh, and upon all his host, upon his chariots, and upon his horsemen. {18} And the Egyptians shall know that I [am] the LORD, when I have gotten me honour upon Pharaoh, upon his chariots, and upon his horsemen. {19} And the angel of God, which went before the camp of Israel, removed and went behind them; and the pillar of the cloud went from before their face, and stood behind them: {20} And it came between the camp of the Egyptians and the camp of Israel; and it was a cloud and darkness [to them], but it gave light by night [to these]: so that the one came not near the other all the night. {21} And Moses stretched out his hand over the sea; and the LORD caused the sea to go [back] by a strong east wind all that night, and made the sea dry [land], and the waters were divided. {22} And the children of Israel went into the midst of the sea upon the dry [ground]: and the waters [were] a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. {23} And the Egyptians pursued, and went in after them to the midst of the sea, [even] all Pharaoh's horses, his chariots, and his horsemen. {24} And it came to pass, that in the morning watch the LORD looked unto the host of the Egyptians through the pillar of fire and of the cloud, and troubled the host of the Egyptians, {25} And took off their chariot wheels, that they drave them heavily: so that the Egyptians said, Let us flee from the face of Israel; for the LORD fighteth for them against the Egyptians. {26} And the LORD said unto Moses, Stretch out thine hand over the sea, that the waters may come again upon the Egyptians, upon their chariots, and upon their horsemen. {27} And Moses stretched forth his hand over the sea, and the sea returned to his strength when the morning appeared; and the Egyptians fled against it; and the LORD overthrew the Egyptians in the midst of the sea. {28} And the waters returned, and covered the chariots, and the horsemen, [and] all the host of Pharaoh that came into the sea after them; there remained [sha’ar:H7064]  not so much as one [’echad:H259]  of them. {29} But the children of Israel walked upon dry [land] in the midst of the sea; and the waters [were] a wall unto them on their right hand, and on their left. {30} Thus the LORD saved Israel that day out of the hand of the Egyptians; and Israel saw the Egyptians dead upon the sea shore. {31} And Israel saw that great work which the LORD did upon the Egyptians: and the people feared the LORD, and believed the LORD, and his servant Moses.”


Verse 4:17


Let’s now consider verse 17: Howbeit Sisera fled away on his feet to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite.”


To The Tent [’ohel:H168] Of Jael [Ya`el:H3278] The Wife [’ishshah:H802] Of Heber [Cheber:H2268] The Kenite [Qeyniy:H7017]


We have already investigated the two words “fled away” and “on his feet,” having to do with Sisera’s escape - presumably to a place of safety - “...to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite…” And previously we learned that Heber had separated himself from the Kenites (as they represent Cain - or the institutional end time churches and denominations). Furthermore in Part 15 we learned that Heber had “pitched his tent (or tabernacle)” in “the plain of Zaanaim” (plural of “tsa`an” (H6813), which appears once as “[that] shall not be taken down” in verse 20 of Isa 33:20-24, “Look upon Zion, the city of our solemnities: thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle [’ohel:H168] [that] shall not be taken down [tsa`an:H6813]...” 


Since we have already examined the terms, “tent,” “Heber,” and “Kenite,” that leaves “Jael” and “the wife,” both of which only appear together in two other references -  Judges 4:21 and 5:24 respectively:


Then Jael [Ya`el:H3278] Heber's wife [’ishshah:H802] took a nail of the tent, and took an hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the nail into his temples, and fastened it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and weary. So he died.”


“Blessed above women shall Jael [Ya`el:H3278] the wife [’ishshah:H802]  of Heber the Kenite be, blessed shall she be above women [’ishshah:H802]  in the tent.”


Of Jael [Ya`el:H3278] 


To gain a little better understanding of who Jael typifies, let’s look at the root words. Jael (Ja`el:H3278) is derived from (ya`el:H3277), which appears as “wild goats” three times in the subsequent passages:


It appears in verse 2 of 1 Samuel 24:1-7, “And it came to pass, when Saul was returned from following the Philistines, that it was told him, saying, Behold, David [is] in the wilderness of Engedi. {2} Then Saul took three thousand chosen men out of all Israel, and went to seek David and his men upon the rocks of the wild goats. [ya`el:H3277] {3} And he came to the sheepcotes by the way, where [was] a cave; and Saul went in to cover his feet: and David and his men remained in the sides of the cave. {4} And the men of David said unto him, Behold the day of which the LORD said unto thee, Behold, I will deliver thine enemy into thine hand, that thou mayest do to him as it shall seem good unto thee. Then David arose, and cut off the skirt of Saul's robe privily. {5} And it came to pass afterward, that David's heart smote him, because he had cut off Saul's skirt. {6} And he said unto his men, The LORD forbid that I should do this thing unto my master, the LORD'S anointed, to stretch forth mine hand against him, seeing he [is] the anointed of the LORD. {7} So David stayed his servants with these words, and suffered them not to rise against Saul. But Saul rose up out of the cave, and went on [his] way.”


Also God asks this question of Job in verse 1 of Job 39:1-4, “Knowest thou the time when the wild goats [ya`el:H3277] of the rock bring forth? [or] canst thou mark when the hinds do calve? {2} Canst thou number the months [that] they fulfil? or knowest thou the time when they bring forth? {3} They bow themselves, they bring forth their young ones, they cast out their sorrows. {4} Their young ones are in good liking, they grow up with corn; they go forth, and return not unto them.”


Lastly, verse 18 of Psalm 104:1- 35  magnificently extols the Creator and Sustainer of both physical as well as spiritual life for His works which He freely bestows upon mankind and thsi world that He spoke into existence: “Bless the LORD, O my soul. O LORD my God, thou art very great; thou art clothed with honour and majesty. {2} Who coverest [thyself] with light as [with] a garment: who stretchest out the heavens like a curtain: {3} Who layeth the beams of his chambers in the waters: who maketh the clouds his chariot: who walketh upon the wings of the wind: {4} Who maketh his angels spirits; his ministers a flaming fire: {5} [Who] laid the foundations of the earth, [that] it should not be removed for ever. {6} Thou coveredst it with the deep as [with] a garment: the waters stood above the mountains. {7} At thy rebuke they fled; at the voice of thy thunder they hasted away. {8} They go up by the mountains; they go down by the valleys unto the place which thou hast founded for them. {9} Thou hast set a bound that they may not pass over; that they turn not again to cover the earth. {10} He sendeth the springs into the valleys, [which] run among the hills. {11} They give drink to every beast of the field: the wild asses quench their thirst. {12] By them shall the fowls of the heaven have their habitation, [which] sing among the branches. {13} He watereth the hills from his chambers: the earth is satisfied with the fruit of thy works. {14} He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the service of man: that he may bring forth food out of the earth; {15} And wine [that] maketh glad the heart of man, [and] oil to make [his] face to shine, and bread [which] strengtheneth man's heart. {16} The trees of the LORD are full [of sap]; the cedars of Lebanon, which he hath planted; {17} Where the birds make their nests: [as for] the stork, the fir trees [are] her house. {18} The high hills [are] a refuge for the wild goats  [ya`el:H3277]; [and] the rocks for the conies. {19} He appointed the moon for seasons: the sun knoweth his going down. {20} Thou makest darkness, and it is night: wherein all the beasts of the forest do creep [forth]. {21} The young lions roar after their prey, and seek their meat from God. {22} The sun ariseth, they gather themselves together, and lay them down in their dens. {23} Man goeth forth unto his work and to his labour until the evening. {24} O LORD, how manifold are thy works! in wisdom hast thou made them all: the earth is full of thy riches. {25} [So is] this great and wide sea, wherein [are] things creeping innumerable, both small and great beasts. {26} There go the ships: [there is] that leviathan, [whom] thou hast made to play therein. {27} These wait all upon thee; that thou mayest give [them] their meat in due season. {28} [That] thou givest them they gather: thou openest thine hand, they are filled with good. {29} Thou hidest thy face, they are troubled: thou takest away their breath, they die, and return to their dust. {30} Thou sendest forth thy spirit, they are created: and thou renewest the face of the earth. {31} The glory of the LORD shall endure for ever: the LORD shall rejoice in his works. {32} He looketh on the earth, and it trembleth: he toucheth the hills, and they smoke. {33} I will sing unto the LORD as long as I live: I will sing praise to my God while I have my being. {34} My meditation of him shall be sweet: I will be glad in the LORD. {35} Let the sinners be consumed out of the earth, and let the wicked be no more. Bless thou the LORD, O my soul. Praise ye the LORD.”


Well, it looks like we’ve run out of time, so I’ll stop here today. Lord willing, in our next study we will continue examining the grandparent word (ya`al:H3276) for “Jael” (Ja`el:H3278) or “wild goat,” (ya`el:H3277) which is spelled identically to the other two, and predominantly rendered as “profit” or “profitable.”














Judges 4 - Part 20

Air Date: June 23, 2017


 “And the LORD discomfited Sisera, and all [his] chariots, and all [his] host, with the edge of the sword before Barak; so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet. {16} But Barak pursued after the chariots, and after the host, unto Harosheth of the Gentiles: and all the host of Sisera fell upon the edge of the sword; [and] there was not a man left. {17} Howbeit Sisera fled away on his feet to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite.”


Jael The Wife Of Heber (Cont.)


We have stopped in our examination of verse 17 to take a more in-depth look at this woman, Jael, Heber’s wife, since Sisera is fleeing towards her tent, in hopes of obtaining safety. In our last study I mentioned that the name Jael (Ja`el:H3278) is identically spelled to its root word (ya`el:H3277) “wild goat,” in three verses in which it appears. However, the grandparent word for Jael is also spelled the same, and is translated as “profit” or “profitable.” With this background in mind, let’s see how God utilizes this grandparent word, (ya`al:H3276) if it’s God’s good pleasure to open our spiritual understanding, in order to discover in what way Jael typifies the Body of Christ:


To Profit Or Not To Profit


Proverbs 2:10 declares, “Treasures of wickedness profit [ya`al:H3276] nothing: but righteousness delivereth from death.”


Likewise, Proverbs 11:4 asserts, “Riches profit [ya`al:H3276] not in the day of wrath: but righteousness delivereth from death.”


Isa 48:17 explains what is indeed spiritually “profitable,”: “Thus saith the LORD, thy Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel; I [am] the LORD thy God which teacheth thee to profit [ya`al:H3276], which leadeth thee by the way [that] thou shouldest go.”


Addressing national Israel (who typifies the end-time institutional churches and denominations) Jeremiah 2: 8 and 11 makes this scathing indictment, and in the process, points out what does not “profit”: “The priests said not, Where [is] the LORD? and they that handle the law knew me not: the pastors also transgressed against me, and the prophets prophesied by Baal, and walked after [things that] do not profit. [ya`al:H3276] {11} Hath a nation changed [their] gods, which [are] yet no gods? but my people have changed their glory for [that which] doth not profit.” [ya`al:H3276] 


And Jeremiah 23:32 further underscores why God abandoned His formerly divine organism - the New Testament churches -  on May 21, 1988: “Behold, I [am] against them that prophesy false dreams, saith the LORD, and do tell them, and cause my people to err by their lies, and by their lightness; yet I sent them not, nor commanded them: therefore they shall not profit [ya`el:H3276] this people at all [ya`el:H3276], saith the LORD.”


From the above citations we understand that Jael (typifying all within the Body of Christ) has indeed been the beneficiary of spiritual “profit” - namely, everlasting Righteousness, Who is the Lord Jesus Christ. There is also another metaphor that God adopts in speaking about His elect which has to do, surprisingly, with “goats” - as we recall that Jael is also identically spelled to “wild goat,” as these next references indicate:


“Wild Goats” [ya`el:H3277] - A Closer Look


In Part 19, I mentioned that the parent word for Jael is rendered, “wild goats” (ya`el:H3277) in the following citations:


1 Samuel 24:2 states, “Then Saul took three thousand chosen men out of all Israel, and went to seek David and his men upon the rocks of the wild goats.” [ya`el:H3277]


Job 39:1 likewise affirms, “Knowest thou the time when the wild goats [ya`el:H3277]

 of the rock bring forth? [or] canst thou mark when the hinds do calve?”


And Psalm 104:18 maintains, “The high hills [are] a refuge for the wild goats [ya`el:H3277]; [and] the rocks for the conies.”


Taking a closer look at these passages one notices that God associates the “wild goats” with two different words for “rocks” (tsuwr:H6697/cela`:H5553) and “high” (gaboaah:H1364) hills/mountains” (har:H2022); the former points spiritually to the Lord Jesus Christ, and the latter (in this context) to the “kingdom of God,” as these next verses indicate:


Deu 32:4 renders H6697 as “He is the Rock”: “[He is] the Rock [tsuwr:H6697], his work [is] perfect: for all his ways [are] judgment: a God of truth and without iniquity, just and right [is] he.”





Psalm 18:2 translates H5553 as “is my rock”:  The LORD [is] my rock, [cela`:H5553] and my fortress, and my deliverer; my God, my strength, in whom I will trust; my buckler, and the horn of my salvation, [and] my high tower.”


And in Isaiah 40:9 “high hill” is rendered “into the high mountain”: “O Zion, that bringest good tidings, get thee up into the high [gaboaah:H1364] mountain [har:H2022]; O Jerusalem, that bringest good tidings, lift up thy voice with strength; lift [it] up, be not afraid; say unto the cities of Judah, Behold your God!”


There are also two other usages for “goats,” (even though they can relate to the non-elect, as in Matthew 25:33, “And he shall set the sheep on his right hand, but the goats on the left.) pertaining to the Savior as well as the Body of Christ:


The first one involves the “LORD’S goat” (pointing to the sacrifice of Christ for His Bride at the foundation of the world), as we read in verses 10, 21-22, and 26 of Leviticus 16:8-26; God uses two different terms for the “LORD’S goat” (sa`iyr:H8163) and the “scapegoat” (`aza’zel:H5799):


“And Aaron shall cast lots upon the two goats [sa`iyr:H8163]; one lot for the LORD, and the other lot for the scapegoat. [`aza’zel:H5799] {9} And Aaron shall bring the goat [sa`iyr:H8163] upon which the LORD'S lot fell, and offer him [for] a sin offering. {10} But the goat [sa`iyr:H8163], on which the lot fell to be the scapegoat [`aza’zel:H5799], shall be presented alive before the LORD, to make an atonement with him, [and] to let him go for a scapegoat [`aza’zel:H5799] into the wilderness. {11} And Aaron shall bring the bullock of the sin offering, which [is] for himself, and shall make an atonement for himself, and for his house, and shall kill the bullock of the sin offering which [is] for himself: {12} And he shall take a censer full of burning coals of fire from off the altar before the LORD, and his hands full of sweet incense beaten small, and bring [it] within the vail: {13} And he shall put the incense upon the fire before the LORD, that the cloud of the incense may cover the mercy seat that [is] upon the testimony, that he die not: {14} And he shall take of the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle [it] with his finger upon the mercy seat eastward; and before the mercy seat shall he sprinkle of the blood with his finger seven times. {15} Then shall he kill the goat [sa`iyr:H8163] of the sin offering, that [is] for the people, and bring his blood within the vail, and do with that blood as he did with the blood of the bullock, and sprinkle it upon the mercy seat, and before the mercy seat: {16} And he shall make an atonement for the holy [place], because of the uncleanness of the children of Israel, and because of their transgressions in all their sins: and so shall he do for the tabernacle of the congregation, that remaineth among them in the midst of their uncleanness. {17} And there shall be no man in the tabernacle of the congregation when he goeth in to make an atonement in the holy [place], until he come out, and have made an atonement for himself, and for his household, and for all the congregation of Israel. {18} And he shall go out unto the altar that [is] before the LORD, and make an atonement for it; and shall take of the blood of the bullock, and of the blood of the goat [sa`iyr:H8163], and put [it] upon the horns of the altar round about. {19} And he shall sprinkle of the blood upon it with his finger seven times, and cleanse it, and hallow it from the uncleanness of the children of Israel. {20} And when he hath made an end of reconciling the holy [place], and the tabernacle of the congregation, and the altar, he shall bring the live goat [sa`iyr:H8163]: {21} And Aaron shall lay both his hands upon the head of the live goat  [sa`iyr:H8163], and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat  [sa`iyr:H8163], and shall send [him] away by the hand of a fit man into the wilderness: {22} And the goat [sa`iyr:H8163] shall bear upon him all their iniquities unto a land not inhabited: and he shall let go the goat [sa`iyr:H8163] in the wilderness. {23} And Aaron shall come into the tabernacle of the congregation, and shall put off the linen garments, which he put on when he went into the holy [place], and shall leave them there: {24} And he shall wash his flesh with water in the holy place, and put on his garments, and come forth, and offer his burnt offering, and the burnt offering of the people, and make an atonement for himself, and for the people. {25} And the fat of the sin offering shall he burn upon the altar. {26} And he that let go the goat [sa`iyr:H8163]  for the scapegoat [`aza’zel:H5799] shall wash his clothes, and bathe his flesh in water, and afterward come into the camp.”


The second example involves a different term for “goats,” (`ez:H5795) and is found in these next references, which metaphorically depict the “hair” (or “covering”) which God has graciously granted to the Bride of Christ in redemption, and likened to a “flock of goats”:


Verse 1 of Song of Solomon 4:1-7 “Behold, thou [art] fair, my love; behold, thou [art] fair; thou [hast] doves' eyes within thy locks: thy hair [is] as a flock of goats [`ez:H5795], that appear from mount Gilead. {2} Thy teeth [are] like a flock [of sheep that are even] shorn, which came up from the washing; whereof every one bear twins, and none [is] barren among them. {3} Thy lips [are] like a thread of scarlet, and thy speech [is] comely: thy temples [are] like a piece of a pomegranate within thy locks. {4} Thy neck [is] like the tower of David builded for an armoury, whereon there hang a thousand bucklers, all shields of mighty men. {5} Thy two breasts [are] like two young roes that are twins, which feed among the lilies. {6} Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, I will get me to the mountain of myrrh, and to the hill of frankincense. {7} Thou [art] all fair, my love; [there is] no spot in thee.”


This same picture is repeated in verse 5 of Song of Solomon 6:3-6, “I [am] my beloved's, and my beloved [is] mine: he feedeth among the lilies. {4} Thou [art] beautiful, O my love, as Tirzah, comely as Jerusalem, terrible as [an army] with banners. {5} Turn away thine eyes from me, for they have overcome me: thy hair [is] as a flock of goats [`ez:H5795] that appear from Gilead. {6} Thy teeth [are] as a flock of sheep which go up from the washing, whereof every one beareth twins, and [there is] not one barren among them.”


The preceding scriptures help to clarify that Jael indeed exemplifies the Bride of Christ. But what about the man that she is married to - Heber? After all we read again in Judges 4:17, 


“Howbeit Sisera fled away on his feet to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite.


At this point, I can’t seem to find evidence for why the affinity between “Jabin the king of Hazor” and the “house of Heber the Kenite” existed; it could be that Jabin was under the impression that Heber was still affiliated with the Kenites, (hence Sisera’s decision to go there), but this is speculation, so perhaps God will reveal this to us in the future, if He so wills.


Heber [Cheber:H2268] - Another Look


In Part 12, I mentioned that Heber, at a minimum, would appear to represent the elect, but I’m wondering if we can be more specific, so I would like for us to consider the grandparent word 

(chabar:H2266) for Heber (which is spelled identically), as well as the parent word (cheber:H2267), which is also spelled identically. I’ll start with H2266, as all but one verse in which H2267 appears, has to do with witchcraft, sorceries, or fortune telling: 


In verse 4 of Exodus 39:1-5, “And of the blue, and purple, and scarlet, they made cloths of service, to do service in the holy [place], and made the holy garments for Aaron; as the LORD commanded Moses. {2} And he made the ephod [of] gold, blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen. {3} And they did beat the gold into thin plates, and cut [it into] wires, to work [it] in the blue, and in the purple, and in the scarlet, and in the fine linen, [with] cunning work. {4} They made shoulderpieces for it, to couple [it] together [chabar:H2266]: by the two edges was it coupled together. [chabar:H2266] {5} And the curious girdle of his ephod, that [was] upon it, [was] of the same, according to the work 

thereof; [of] gold, blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen; as the LORD commanded Moses.”


Verse 11 of Deuteronomy 18:9-14 renders this term as “or a charmer,” regarding various prohibitions that God instructed the Israelites to obey as they  entered the Promised Land: “When thou art come into the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not learn to do after the abominations of those nations. {10} There shall not be found among you [any one] that maketh his son or his daughter to pass through the fire, [or] that useth divination, [or] an observer of times, or an enchanter, or a witch,  {11} Or a charmer [chabar:H2266], or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. {12} For all that do these things [are] an abomination unto the LORD: and because of these abominations the LORD thy God doth drive them out from before thee. {13} Thou shalt be perfect with the LORD thy God. {14} For these nations, which thou shalt possess, hearkened unto observers of times, and unto diviners: but as for thee, the LORD thy God hath not suffered thee so [to do].”


In 2 Chronicles  20:35-37, this word appears three times in each of these verses as “join” or “joined”: “And after this did Jehoshaphat king of Judah join [chabar:H2266] himself with Ahaziah king of Israel, who did very wickedly: {36} And he joined [chabar:H2266] himself with him to make ships to go to Tarshish: and they made the ships in Eziongeber.  {37} Then Eliezer the son of Dodavah of Mareshah prophesied against Jehoshaphat, saying, Because thou hast joined [chabar:H2266] thyself with Ahaziah, the LORD hath broken thy works. And the ships were broken, that they were not able to go to Tarshish.”


Verse 5 of Psalm 58:1-5, renders this word as “charming,” in this passage in which the “congregation” (pointing to the end of the church era) is being reproved for their wickedness in heart (not necessarily outwardly) and disparagingly compared to one of the fastest striking snakes on the planet, which like all snakes that lacking “ears,” appear deaf to the snake charmer’s melodies: “[To the chief Musician, Altaschith, Michtam of David.]  Do ye indeed speak righteousness, O congregation? do ye judge uprightly, O ye sons of men? {2} Yea, in heart ye work wickedness; ye weigh the violence of your hands in the earth. {3} The wicked are estranged from the womb: they go astray as soon as they be born, speaking lies. {4} Their poison [is] like the poison of a serpent: [they are] like the deaf adder [that] stoppeth her ear; {5} Which will not hearken to the voice of charmers, charming [chabar:H2266] never so wisely.”


It looks like I’ll have to stop here today, and Lord willing, we will continue our investigation of Heber, Sisera and Jael in our next study. 



Judges 4 - Part 21

Air Date: June 26, 2017


In our examination of Judges 4, we have come down to the last 8 verses of this intriguing chapter:


“Howbeit Sisera fled away on his feet to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite. {18} And Jael went out to meet Sisera, and said unto him, Turn in, my lord, turn in to me; fear not. And when he had turned in unto her into the tent, she covered him with a mantle. {19} And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him. {20} Again he said unto her, Stand in the door of the tent, and it shall be, when any man doth come and enquire of thee, and say, Is there any man here? that thou shalt say, No. {21} Then Jael Heber's wife took a nail of the tent, and took an hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the nail into his temples, and fastened it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and weary. So he died. {22} And, behold, as Barak pursued Sisera, Jael came out to meet him, and said unto him, Come, and I will shew thee the man whom thou seekest. And when he came into her [tent], behold, Sisera lay dead, and the nail [was] in his temples. {23} So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel. {24} And the hand of the children of Israel prospered, and prevailed against Jabin the king of Canaan, until they had destroyed Jabin king of Canaan.”


Heber [Cheber:H2268] - Another Look (Cont.)


At the close of our last study I began to take a closer look at Heber - Jael’s husband - to see if we could get a more specific portrait of who he represents spiritually. To do this, we began examining some of the verses, in which the grandparent word (chabar:H2266) for Heber (spelled identically) is found:


Verse 3 of Psalm 122:1-4 translates this term as “compact”: “[A Song of degrees of David.] I was glad when they said unto me, Let us go into the house of the LORD. {2} Our feet shall stand within thy gates, O Jerusalem. {3} Jerusalem is builded as a city that is compact [chabar:H2266] together: {4} Whither the tribes go up, the tribes of the LORD, unto the testimony of Israel, to give thanks unto the name of the LORD.” 


Verse 3 is a reference to the “heavenly Jerusalem” and reminds us of what we read in 1 Peter 2:4-6,


“To whom coming, [as unto] a living stone, disallowed indeed of men, but chosen of God, [and] precious, {5} Ye also, as lively [“living”] stones, are built up a spiritual house, an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices, acceptable to God by Jesus Christ. {6} Wherefore also it is contained in the scripture, Behold, I lay in Sion a chief corner stone, elect, precious: and he that believeth on him shall not be confounded.”


Verse 3 of Ecclesiastes 9:3-6, renders this word as “joined”: This [is] an evil among all [things] that are done under the sun, that [there is] one event unto all: yea, also the heart of the sons of men is full of evil, and madness [is] in their heart while they live, and after that [they go] to the dead. {4} For to him that is joined [chabar:H2266] to all the living there is hope: for a living dog is better than a dead lion. {5} For the living know that they shall die: but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory of them is forgotten. {6} Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished; neither have they any more a portion for ever in any [thing] that is done under the sun.”


Verse 9 of Eze 1:4-14 is also translated as “[were] joined,” in this glorious vision that God gave to Ezekiel regarding the “four living creatures” who spiritually are a representation of the glory of God: “And I looked, and, behold, a whirlwind came out of the north, a great cloud, and a fire infolding itself, and a brightness [was] about it, and out of the midst thereof as the colour of amber, out of the midst of the fire. {5} Also out of the midst thereof [came] the likeness of four living creatures. And this [was] their appearance; they had the likeness of a man. {6} And every one had four faces, and every one had four wings. {7} And their feet [were] straight feet; and the sole of their feet [was] like the sole of a calf's foot: and they sparkled like the colour of burnished brass. {8} And [they had] the hands of a man under their wings on their four sides; and they four had their faces and their wings. {9} Their wings [were] joined [chabar:H2266] one to another; they turned not when they went; they went every one straight forward. {10} As for the likeness of their faces, they four had the face of a man, and the face of a lion, on the right side: and they four had the face of an ox on the left side; they four also had the face of an eagle. {11} Thus [were] their faces: and their wings [were] stretched upward; two [wings] of every one [were] joined one to another, and two covered their bodies. {12} And they went every one straight forward: whither the spirit was to go, they went; [and] they turned not when they went. {13} As for the likeness of the living creatures, their appearance [was] like burning coals of fire, [and] like the appearance of lamps: it went up and down among the living creatures; and the fire was bright, and out of the fire went forth lightning. {14} And the living creatures ran and returned as the appearance of a flash of lightning.”


Conclusion: Identifying Heber - The Husband Of Jael


Starting with our last lesson (Part 20), and continuing today, we have been investigating two of the root words that are associated with Heber (Cheber:H2268), all of which are identically spelled: the parent word (cheber:H2267), as well as the grandparent word (chabar:H2266). We did this in order to try to understand how Heber relates to Jael spiritually (beyond the obvious marriage relationship). We would assume that since Jael symbolizes the Bride (or Body) of Christ, Heber must represent Christ, who is married to all the elect. And indeed we saw in some of our earlier lessons, that he separated himself from the Kenites (associated with Cain - who typifies the end-time institutional churches and denominations - and Christ did this very thing on May 21, 1988 - when the Holy Spirit abandoned all churches worldwide and without exception, and they ceased being the external representation of the kingdom of God on earth), and “...pitched his tent [or tabernacle” unto the plain of Zaanaim (plural of tsa`an (H6813) - “[a tabernacle] that shall not be taken down” - Isaiah 33:20 only), which is [by] by Kedesh.” (“sanctified” or “set apart” for the purpose of God). 


The parent word (cheber:H2267) for Heber is translated in the following ways: wide(“in common”) (2x), enchantment (2x),  and once as: company,” “charmer” (with H2266), and charming” (again with H2266)


The grandparent word (chabar:H2666) for Heber is rendered in these ways:couple(8x), join(8x),couple together(4x), join together (3x), and once as : compact(1x), charmer” (with H2267),charming” (with H2267), have fellowship,” “league,” and heap up.” 


So, as is frequently the case, we see multiple spiritual portraits being underscored in this chapter - the relationship between Barak (or Christ) and Deborah (or The Word of God) and now between Jael (or the Bride of Christ) and Heber (or Christ) - as they are “joined” together - with the express purpose of bringing judgment (foreshawdowing our current “day of judgment”) against the kingdom of Satan (or Babylon); however the focus is not on Heber, but rather on Jael in this tableau - who typifies the elect. God is accentuating the role of the elect in this endeavor which is why we read earlier regarding Deborah’s words to Barak in Judges 4:9,


“And she said, I will surely go with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman. And Deborah arose, and went with Barak to Kedesh.”


Judges 4:18


Lets’s now consider the first phrase in Judges 4:18, “And Jael went out [yatsa’:H3318] to meet [qir’ah:H7125] Sisera”:And Jael went out to meet Sisera, and said unto him, Turn in, my lord, turn in to me; fear not. And when he had turned in unto her into the tent, she covered him with a mantle.” 


And Jael Went Out To Meet Sisera


The two words, “went out” (yatsa’:H3318) and “to meet” (qir’ah:H7125)  appear together in 41 references; Let’s consider some of these to see how God treats them in the Old Testament:


In verse 7 of Exodus 18:5-11, these two terms are also rendered as “went out” and “to meet,” in which Moses is reunited with his father-in-law, his wife, and their two sons in this on this happy occcasion: “And Jethro, Moses' father in law, came with his sons and his wife unto Moses into the wilderness, where he encamped at the mount of God: {6} And he said unto Moses, I thy father in law Jethro am come unto thee, and thy wife, and her two sons with her. {7} And Moses went out [yatsa’:H3318] to meet [qir’ah:H7125] his father in law, and did obeisance, and kissed him; and they asked each other of [their] welfare; and they came into the tent. {8} And Moses told his father in law all that the LORD had done unto Pharaoh and to the Egyptians for Israel's sake, [and] all the travail that had come upon them by the way, and [how] the LORD delivered them. {9} And Jethro rejoiced for all the goodness which the LORD had done to Israel, whom he had delivered out of the hand of the Egyptians. {10} And Jethro said, Blessed [be] the LORD, who hath delivered you out of the hand of the Egyptians, and out of the hand of Pharaoh, who hath delivered the people from under the hand of the Egyptians. {11} Now I know that the LORD [is] greater than all gods: for in the thing wherein they dealt proudly [he was] above them.”


An encounter of a much different nature, however, takes place in verses 18 and 20 of Numbers 18:14-21 in which these terms are rendered as: “by me lest I come out” and “against” along with “came out” and “against”: “And Moses sent messengers from Kadesh unto the king of Edom, Thus saith thy brother Israel, Thou knowest all the travail that hath befallen us: {15} How our fathers went down into Egypt, and we have dwelt in Egypt a long time; and the Egyptians vexed us, and our fathers: {16} And when we cried unto the LORD, he heard our voice, and sent an angel, and hath brought us forth out of Egypt: and, behold, we [are] in Kadesh, a city in the uttermost of thy border: {17} Let us pass, I pray thee, through thy country: we will not pass through the fields, or through the vineyards, neither will we drink [of] the water of the wells: we will go by the king's [high] way, we will not turn to the right hand nor to the left, until we have passed thy borders. {18} And Edom said unto him, Thou shalt not pass by me, lest I come out against thee with the sword. {19} And the children of Israel said unto him, We will go by the high way: and if I and my cattle drink of thy water, then I will pay for it: I will only, without [doing] any thing [else], go through on my feet. {20} And he said, Thou shalt not go through. And Edom came out against him with much people, and with a strong hand. {21} Thus Edom refused to give Israel passage through his border: wherefore Israel turned away from him.”


There is another account - one also involving deception - and similar to what we find here in Judges 4 with regard Jael who “went out to meet” Sisera. This is found in verse 6 of Jeremiah 41:1-10 and translated as “went forth” and “to meet;” the time frame for this event occurred after the destruction of Jerusalem in 587 BC:  “Now it came to pass in the seventh month, [that] Ishmael the son of Nethaniah the son of Elishama, of the seed royal, and the princes of the king, even ten men with him, came unto Gedaliah the son of Ahikam to Mizpah; and there they did eat bread together in Mizpah. {2} Then arose Ishmael the son of Nethaniah, and the ten men that were with him, and smote Gedaliah the son of Ahikam the son of Shaphan with the sword, and slew him, whom the king of Babylon had made governor over the land. {3} Ishmael also slew all the Jews that were with him, [even] with Gedaliah, at Mizpah, and the Chaldeans that were found there, [and] the men of war. {4} And it came to pass the second day after he had slain Gedaliah, and no man knew [it], {5} That there came certain from Shechem, from Shiloh, and from Samaria, [even] fourscore men, having their beards shaven, and their clothes rent, and having cut themselves, with offerings and incense in their hand, to bring [them] to the house of the LORD.{6} And Ishmael the son of Nethaniah went forth [yatsa’:H3318]  from Mizpah to meet [qir’ah:H7125] them, weeping all along as he went: and it came to pass, as he met them, he said unto them, Come to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam. {7} And it was [so], when they came into the midst of the city, that Ishmael the son of Nethaniah slew them, [and cast them] into the midst of the pit, he, and the men that [were] with him. {8} But ten men were found among them that said unto Ishmael, Slay us not: for we have treasures in the field, of wheat, and of barley, and of oil, and of honey. So he forbare, and slew them not among their brethren. {9} Now the pit wherein Ishmael had cast all the dead bodies of the men, whom he had slain because of Gedaliah, [was] it which Asa the king had made for fear of Baasha king of Israel: [and] Ishmael the son of Nethaniah filled it with [them that were] slain. {10} Then Ishmael carried away captive all the residue of the people that [were] in Mizpah, [even] the king's daughters, and all the people that remained in Mizpah, whom Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard had committed to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam: and Ishmael the son of Nethaniah carried them away captive, and departed to go over to the Ammonites.”


I’ll just mention one other example, found later on in the book of Judges, in verse 34 of chapter 11:1-40, which involves a solemnly serious encounter that was totally unexpected: “Now Jephthah the Gileadite was a mighty man of valour, and he [was] the son of an harlot: and Gilead begat Jephthah. {2} And Gilead's wife bare him sons; and his wife's sons grew up, and they thrust out Jephthah, and said unto him, Thou shalt not inherit in our father's house; for thou [art] the son of a strange woman. {3} Then Jephthah fled from his brethren, and dwelt in the land of Tob: and there were gathered vain men to Jephthah, and went out with him. {4} And it came to pass in process of time, that the children of Ammon made war against Israel. {5} And it was so, that when the children of Ammon made war against Israel, the elders of Gilead went to fetch Jephthah out of the land of Tob: {6} And they said unto Jephthah, Come, and be our captain, that we may fight with the children of Ammon. {7} And Jephthah said unto the elders of Gilead, Did not ye hate me, and expel me out of my father's house? and why are ye come unto me now when ye are in distress? {8} And the elders of Gilead said unto Jephthah, Therefore we turn again to thee now, that thou mayest go with us, and fight against the children of Ammon, and be our head over all the inhabitants of Gilead. {9} And Jephthah said unto the elders of Gilead, If ye bring me home again to fight against the children of Ammon, and the LORD deliver them before me, shall I be your head? {10} And the elders of Gilead said unto Jephthah, The LORD be witness between us, if we do not so according to thy words. {11} Then Jephthah went with the elders of Gilead, and the people made him head and captain over them: and Jephthah uttered all his words before the LORD in Mizpeh. {12} And Jephthah sent messengers unto the king of the children of Ammon, saying, What hast thou to do with me, that thou art come against me to fight in my land? {13} And the king of the children of Ammon answered unto the messengers of Jephthah, Because Israel took away my land, when they came up out of Egypt, from Arnon even unto Jabbok, and unto Jordan: now therefore restore those [lands] again peaceably. {14} And Jephthah sent messengers again unto the king of the children of Ammon: {15} And said unto him, Thus saith Jephthah, Israel took not away the land of Moab, nor the land of the children of Ammon: {16} But when Israel came up from Egypt, and walked through the wilderness unto the Red sea, and came to Kadesh; {17} Then Israel sent messengers unto the king of Edom, saying, Let me, I pray thee, pass through thy land: but the king of Edom would not hearken [thereto]. And in like manner they sent unto the king of Moab: but he would not [consent]: and Israel abode in Kadesh. {18} Then they went along through the wilderness, and compassed the land of Edom, and the land of Moab, and came by the east side of the land of Moab, and pitched on the other side of Arnon, but came not within the border of Moab: for Arnon [was] the border of Moab. {19} And Israel sent messengers unto Sihon king of the Amorites, the king of Heshbon; and Israel said unto him, Let us pass, we pray thee, through thy land into my place. {20} But Sihon trusted not Israel to pass through his coast: but Sihon gathered all his people together, and pitched in Jahaz, and fought against Israel. {21} And the LORD God of Israel delivered Sihon and all his people into the hand of Israel, and they smote them: so Israel possessed all the land of the Amorites, the inhabitants of that country. {22} And they possessed all the coasts of the Amorites, from Arnon even unto Jabbok, and from the wilderness even unto Jordan. {23} So now the LORD God of Israel hath dispossessed the Amorites from before his people Israel, and shouldest thou possess it? {24} Wilt not thou possess that which Chemosh thy god giveth thee to possess? So whomsoever the LORD our God shall drive out from before us, them will we possess. {25} And now [art] thou any thing better than Balak the son of Zippor, king of Moab? did he ever strive against Israel, or did he ever fight against them, {26} While Israel dwelt in Heshbon and her towns, and in Aroer and her towns, and in all the cities that [be] along by the coasts of Arnon, three hundred years? why therefore did ye not recover [them] within that time? 


I know that I’m in the middle of this lengthy passage, but we have run out of time. Lord willing, we will pick this up in our next lesson:










Judges 4 - Part 22

Air Date: June 28, 2017


In our examination of Judges 4, we have come down to the last 7 verses of this intriguing chapter:


“And Jael went out to meet Sisera, and said unto him, Turn in, my lord, turn in to me; fear not. And when he had turned in unto her into the tent, she covered him with a mantle. {19} And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him. {20} Again he said unto her, Stand in the door of the tent, and it shall be, when any man doth come and enquire of thee, and say, Is there any man here? that thou shalt say, No. {21} Then Jael Heber's wife took a nail of the tent, and took an hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the nail into his temples, and fastened it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and weary. So he died. {22} And, behold, as Barak pursued Sisera, Jael came out to meet him, and said unto him, Come, and I will shew thee the man whom thou seekest. And when he came into her [tent], behold, Sisera lay dead, and the nail [was] in his temples. {23} So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel. {24} And the hand of the children of Israel prospered, and prevailed against Jabin the king of Canaan, until they had destroyed Jabin king of Canaan.”


Unfortunately, I had to conclude our last study in the middle of a lengthy passage - Judges 11:1-40 - as we were considering various citations that contained the two terms,  “went out” (yatsa’:H3318) and “to meet” (qir’ah:H7125) found in Judges 4:11 in the first phrase of that verse: ““And Jael went out to meet Sisera…” I stopped in our reading at verse 26, so I’ll pick up with verse 27 of Judges 11:


“Wherefore I have not sinned against thee, but thou doest me wrong to war against me: the LORD the Judge be judge this day between the children of Israel and the children of Ammon. {28} Howbeit the king of the children of Ammon hearkened not unto the words of Jephthah which he sent him. {29} Then the Spirit of the LORD came upon Jephthah, and he passed over Gilead, and Manasseh, and passed over Mizpeh of Gilead, and from Mizpeh of Gilead he passed over [unto] the children of Ammon. {30} And Jephthah vowed a vow unto the LORD, and said, If thou shalt without fail deliver the children of Ammon into mine hands, {31} Then it shall be, that whatsoever cometh forth of the doors of my house to meet me, when I return in peace from the children of Ammon, shall surely be the LORD'S, and I will offer it up for a burnt offering. {32} So Jephthah passed over unto the children of Ammon to fight against them; and the LORD delivered them into his hands. {33} And he smote them from Aroer, even till thou come to Minnith, [even] twenty cities, and unto the plain of the vineyards, with a very great slaughter. Thus the children of Ammon were subdued before the children of Israel. {34} And Jephthah came to Mizpeh unto his house, and, behold, his daughter came out to meet him with timbrels and with dances: and she [was his] only child; beside her he had neither son nor daughter. {35} And it came to pass, when he saw her, that he rent his clothes, and said, Alas, my daughter! thou hast brought me very low, and thou art one of them that trouble me: for I have opened my mouth unto the LORD, and I cannot go back. {36} And she said unto him, My father, [if] thou hast opened thy mouth unto the LORD, do to me according to that which hath proceeded out of thy mouth; forasmuch as the LORD hath taken vengeance for thee of thine enemies, [even] of the children of Ammon. {37} And she said unto her father, Let this thing be done for me: let me alone two months, that I may go up and down upon the mountains, and bewail my virginity, I and my fellows. {38} And he said, Go. And he sent her away [for] two months: and she went with her companions, and bewailed her virginity upon the mountains. {39} And it came to pass at the end of two months, that she returned unto her father, who did with her [according] to his vow which he had vowed: and she knew no man. And it was a custom in Israel, {40} [That] the daughters of Israel went yearly to lament the daughter of Jephthah the Gileadite four days in a year.”




And Said [’amar:H559] Unto Him, Turn In [cuwr:H5493] My Lord [’adown:H113], Turn In [cuwr:H5493] To Me; Fear [yare’:H3372] Not


In this first phrase we discover the word “turn in” used three times (along with another word, forming three sets) in verse 18, as Jael says: “unto him turn in” [cuwr:H5493] “my lord” [’adown:H113]; the next set is: “turn in” [cuwr:H5493]  and “to me fear” [yare’:H3372]; and lastly, the third set is: “and when he had turned in unto her”[cuwr:H5493] and “in the tent”[’ohel:H168]. By this threefold repetition in each of these sets, we understand that the purpose of God for Sisera is being established, both in the historical context, as well as spiritually. We also want to keep in mind that Jael typifies God’s elect, and Sisera is a type of Satan.


Set # 1: Unto Him, Turn In [cuwr:H5493] My Lord [’adown:H113]


The two terms that comprise this first set are found in five other notable accounts, and each has to do with death and/or judgment, as we find here in Judges 4. The first one appears in verse 2 of Genesis 19:1-11, in which these two “angels” (or “messengers”) are two members of the Godhead, Who have come to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah:


“And there came two angels [i.e., “messengers”] to Sodom at even; and Lot sat in the gate of Sodom: and Lot seeing [them] rose up to meet them; and he bowed himself with his face toward the ground; {2} And he said, Behold now, my lords [’adown:H113], turn in [cuwr:H5493], I pray you, into your servant's house, and tarry all night, and wash your feet, and ye shall rise up early, and go on your ways. And they said, Nay; but we will abide in the street all night. {3} And he pressed upon them greatly; and they turned in unto him, and entered into his house; and he made them a feast, and did bake unleavened bread, and they did eat. {4} But before they lay down, the men of the city, [even] the men of Sodom, compassed the house round, both old and young, all the people from every quarter: {5} And they called unto Lot, and said unto him, Where [are] the men which came in to thee this night? bring them out unto us, that we may know them. {6} And Lot went out at the door unto them, and shut the door after him, {7} And said, I pray you, brethren, do not so wickedly. {8} Behold now, I have two daughters which have not known man; let me, I pray you, bring them out unto you, and do ye to them as [is] good in your eyes: only unto these men do nothing; for therefore came they under the shadow of my roof. {9} And they said, Stand back. And they said [again], This one [fellow] came in to sojourn, and he will needs be a judge: now will we deal worse with thee, than with them. And they pressed sore upon the man, [even] Lot, and came near to break the door. {10} But the men put forth their hand, and pulled Lot into the house to them, and shut to the door. {11} And they smote the men that [were] at the door of the house with blindness, both small and great: so that they wearied themselves to find the door.”


The next passage is found in verses 11-12 of the historical parable in Judges 19:1-30, in which these terms are translated as, “unto his master,” and “I pray thee, let us turn in” in verse 11, and in verse 12 as: “And his master” and “unto him, We will not turn aside”:


“And it came to pass in those days, when [there was] no king in Israel, that there was a certain Levite sojourning on the side of mount Ephraim, who took to him a concubine out of Bethlehemjudah. {2} And his concubine played the whore against him, and went away from him unto her father's house to Bethlehemjudah, and was there four whole months. {3} And her husband arose, and went after her, to speak friendly unto her, [and] to bring her again, having his servant with him, and a couple of asses: and she brought him into her father's house: and when the father of the damsel saw him, he rejoiced to meet him. {4} And his father in law, the damsel's father, retained him; and he abode with him three days: so they did eat and drink, and lodged there. {5} And it came to pass on the fourth day, when they arose early in the morning, that he rose up to depart: and the damsel's father said unto his son in law, Comfort thine heart with a morsel of bread, and afterward go your way. {6} And they sat down, and did eat and drink both of them together: for the damsel's father had said unto the man, Be content, I pray thee, and tarry all night, and let thine heart be merry. {7} And when the man rose up to depart, his father in law urged him: therefore he lodged there again. {8} And he arose early in the morning on the fifth day to depart: and the damsel's father said, Comfort thine heart, I pray thee. And they tarried until afternoon, and they did eat both of them. {9} And when the man rose up to depart, he, and his concubine, and his servant, his father in law, the damsel's father, said unto him, Behold, now the day draweth toward evening, I pray you tarry all night: behold, the day groweth to an end, lodge here, that thine heart may be merry; and to morrow get you early on your way, that thou mayest go home. {10} But the man would not tarry that night, but he rose up and departed, and came over against Jebus, which [is] Jerusalem; and [there were] with him two asses saddled, his concubine also [was] with him. {11} [And] when they [were] by Jebus, the day was far spent; and the servant said unto his master [’adown:H113], Come, I pray thee, and let us turn in [cuwr:H5493] into this city of the Jebusites, and lodge in it. {12} And his master [’adown:H113] said unto him, We will not turn aside [cuwr:H5493] hither into the city of a stranger, that [is] not of the children of Israel; we will pass over to Gibeah. {13} And he said unto his servant, Come, and let us draw near to one of these places to lodge all night, in Gibeah, or in Ramah. {14} And they passed on and went their way; and the sun went down upon them [when they were] by Gibeah, which [belongeth] to Benjamin. {15} And they turned aside thither, to go in [and] to lodge in Gibeah: and when he went in, he sat him down in a street of the city: for [there was] no man that took them into his house to lodging. {16} And, behold, there came an old man from his work out of the field at even, which [was] also of mount Ephraim; and he sojourned in Gibeah: but the men of the place [were] Benjamites. {17} And when he had lifted up his eyes, he saw a wayfaring man in the street of the city: and the old man said, Whither goest thou? and whence comest thou? {18} And he said unto him, We [are] passing from Bethlehemjudah toward the side of mount Ephraim; from thence [am] I: and I went to Bethlehemjudah, but I [am now] going to the house of the LORD; and there [is] no man that receiveth me to house. {19} Yet there is both straw and provender for our asses; and there is bread and wine also for me, and for thy handmaid, and for the young man [which is] with thy servants: [there is] no want of any thing. {20} And the old man said, Peace [be] with thee; howsoever [let] all thy wants [lie] upon me; only lodge not in the street. {21} So he brought him into his house, and gave provender unto the asses: and they washed their feet, and did eat and drink. {22} [Now] as they were making their hearts merry, behold, the men of the city, certain sons of Belial, beset the house round about, [and] beat at the door, and spake to the master of the house, the old man, saying, Bring forth the man that came into thine house, that we may know him. {23} And the man, the master of the house, went out unto them, and said unto them, Nay, my brethren, [nay], I pray you, do not [so] wickedly; seeing that this man is come into mine house, do not this folly. {24} Behold, [here is] my daughter a maiden, and his concubine; them I will bring out now, and humble ye them, and do with them what seemeth good unto you: but unto this man do not so vile a thing. {25} But the men would not hearken to him: so the man took his concubine, and brought her forth unto them; and they knew her, and abused her all the night until the morning: and when the day began to spring, they let her go. {26} Then came the woman in the dawning of the day, and fell down at the door of the man's house where her lord [was], till it was light. {27} And her lord rose up in the morning, and opened the doors of the house, and went out to go his way: and, behold, the woman his concubine was fallen down [at] the door of the house, and her hands [were] upon the threshold. {28} And he said unto her, Up, and let us be going. But none answered. Then the man took her [up] upon an ass, and the man rose up, and gat him unto his place. {29} And when he was come into his house, he took a knife, and laid hold on his concubine, and divided her, [together] with her bones, into twelve pieces, and sent her into all the coasts of Israel. {30} And it was so, that all that saw it said, There was no such deed done nor seen from the day that the children of Israel came up out of the land of Egypt unto this day: consider of it, take advice, and speak [your minds].” 


The next citation in which these two words are found is in verse 9 of 2 Samuel 16:5-6, and 8-14, in which these terms are translated as: “my lord” and “I pray thee, and take off”: 


“And when king David came to Bahurim, behold, thence came out a man of the family of the house of Saul, whose name [was] Shimei, the son of Gera: he came forth, and cursed still as he came. {6} And he cast stones at David, and at all the servants of king David: and all the people and all the mighty men [were] on his right hand and on his left. ... {8} The LORD hath returned upon thee all the blood of the house of Saul, in whose stead thou hast reigned; and the LORD hath delivered the kingdom into the hand of Absalom thy son: and, behold, thou [art taken] in thy mischief, because thou [art] a bloody man. {9}  Then said Abishai the son of Zeruiah unto the king, Why should this dead dog curse my lord [’adown:H113] the king? let me go over, I pray thee, and take off [cuwr:H5493] his head. {10} And the king said, What have I to do with you, ye sons of Zeruiah? so let him curse, because the LORD hath said unto him, Curse David. Who shall then say, Wherefore hast thou done so? {11} And David said to Abishai, and to all his servants, Behold, my son, which came forth of my bowels, seeketh my life: how much more now [may this] Benjamite [do it]? let him alone, and let him curse; for the LORD hath bidden him. {12} It may be that the LORD will look on mine affliction, and that the LORD will requite me good for his cursing this day. {13} And as David and his men went by the way, Shimei went along on the hill's side over against him, and cursed as he went, and threw stones at him, and cast dust. {14} And the king, and all the people that [were] with him, came weary, and refreshed themselves there.”


After the death of Absalom who tried to take over the kingdom from David his father, we read this account in 2 Samuel 19:15-23, concerning Shimei, when David came back to Jerusalem to regain his authority once again:


“So the king returned, and came to Jordan. And Judah came to Gilgal, to go to meet the king, to conduct the king over Jordan. {16} And Shimei the son of Gera, a Benjamite, which [was] of Bahurim, hasted and came down with the men of Judah to meet king David. {17} And [there were] a thousand men of Benjamin with him, and Ziba the servant of the house of Saul, and his fifteen sons and his twenty servants with him; and they went over Jordan before the king. {18} And there went over a ferry boat to carry over the king's household, and to do what he thought good. And Shimei the son of Gera fell down before the king, as he was come over Jordan; {19} And said unto the king, Let not my lord impute iniquity unto me, neither do thou remember that which thy servant did perversely the day that my lord the king went out of Jerusalem, that the king should take it to his heart. {20} For thy servant doth know that I have sinned: therefore, behold, I am come the first this day of all the house of Joseph to go down to meet my lord the king. {21} But Abishai the son of Zeruiah answered and said, Shall not Shimei be put to death for this, because he cursed the LORD'S anointed? {22} And David said, What have I to do with you, ye sons of Zeruiah, that ye should this day be adversaries unto me? shall there any man be put to death this day in Israel? for do not I know that I [am] this day king over Israel? {23} Therefore the king said unto Shimei, Thou shalt not die. And the king sware unto him.”


However in 1 Kings 2:1-4, 8-10, and 36-46, God gives us more information regarding this unusual historical parable regarding this man Shimei, who essentially, was placed under house arrest, by King Solomon, following the death of his father, and with respect to David’s wishes:


 “Now the days of David drew nigh that he should die; and he charged Solomon his son, saying, {2} I go the way of all the earth: be thou strong therefore, and shew thyself a man; {3} And keep the charge of the LORD thy God, to walk in his ways, to keep his statutes, and his commandments, and his judgments, and his testimonies, as it is written in the law of Moses, that thou mayest prosper in all that thou doest, and whithersoever thou turnest thyself: {4} That the LORD may continue his word which he spake concerning me, saying, If thy children take heed to their way, to walk before me in truth with all their heart and with all their soul, there shall not fail thee (said he) a man on the throne of Israel. ... {8} And, behold, [thou hast] with thee Shimei the son of Gera, a Benjamite of Bahurim, which cursed me with a grievous curse in the day when I went to Mahanaim: but he came down to meet me at Jordan, and I sware to him by the LORD, saying, I will not put thee to death with the sword. {9} Now therefore hold him not guiltless: for thou [art] a wise man, and knowest what thou oughtest to do unto him; but his hoar head bring thou down to the grave with blood. {10} So David slept with his fathers, and was buried in the city of David. ... {36} And the king sent and called for Shimei, and said unto him, Build thee an house in Jerusalem, and dwell there, and go not forth thence any whither. {37} For it shall be, [that] on the day thou goest out, and passest over the brook Kidron, thou shalt know for certain that thou shalt surely die: thy blood shall be upon thine own head. {38} And Shimei said unto the king, The saying [is] good: as my lord the king hath said, so will thy servant do. And Shimei dwelt in Jerusalem many days. {39} And it came to pass at the end of three years, that two of the servants of Shimei ran away unto Achish son of Maachah king of Gath. And they told Shimei, saying, Behold, thy servants [be] in Gath. {40} And Shimei arose, and saddled his ass, and went to Gath to Achish to seek his servants: and Shimei went, and brought his servants from Gath. {41} And it was told Solomon that Shimei had gone from Jerusalem to Gath, and was come again. {42} And the king sent and called for Shimei, and said unto him, Did I not make thee to swear by the LORD, and protested unto thee, saying, Know for a certain, on the day thou goest out, and walkest abroad any whither, that thou shalt surely die? and thou saidst unto me, The word [that] I have heard [is] good. {43} Why then hast thou not kept the oath of the LORD, and the commandment that I have charged thee with? {44} The king said moreover to Shimei, Thou knowest all the wickedness which thine heart is privy to, that thou didst to David my father: therefore the LORD shall return thy wickedness upon thine own head; {45} And king Solomon [shall be] blessed, and the throne of David shall be established before the LORD for ever. {46} So the king commanded Benaiah the son of Jehoiada; which went out, and fell upon him, that he died. And the kingdom was established in the hand of Solomon.”


I have never worked on the spiritual meaning of Shimei, and who he typifies, but I wanted you to see the series of events that led up to his death.


It looks like I have to stop here for today, Lord willing, in our next lesson, we will consider the last two references in set # 1 of verse 18. 







Judges 4 - Part 23

Air Date: June 30, 2017


In our examination of Judges 4, we have come down to the last 7 verses of this intriguing chapter:


“And Jael went out to meet Sisera, and said unto him, Turn in, my lord, turn in to me; fear not. And when he had turned in unto her into the tent, she covered him with a mantle. {19} And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him. {20} Again he said unto her, Stand in the door of the tent, and it shall be, when any man doth come and enquire of thee, and say, Is there any man here? that thou shalt say, No. {21} Then Jael Heber's wife took a nail of the tent, and took an hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the nail into his temples, and fastened it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and weary. So he died. {22} And, behold, as Barak pursued Sisera, Jael came out to meet him, and said unto him, Come, and I will shew thee the man whom thou seekest. And when he came into her [tent], behold, Sisera lay dead, and the nail [was] in his temples. {23} So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel. {24} And the hand of the children of Israel prospered, and prevailed against Jabin the king of Canaan, until they had destroyed Jabin king of Canaan.”


Set # 1 (Cont.): Unto Him, Turn In [cuwr:H5493] My Lord [’adown:H113] 



At the end of our previous study there was not enough time to consider the last two passages in set # 1 in verse 18, so I would like to mention those, and then 


The next passage that contains the two words that we are examining today is in verse 32 of 2 Kings 6:31-33, and chapter 7:1-2, and 16-20; these terms are rendered as “to take away” and “of his master’s”: Then he said, God do so and more also to me, if the head of Elisha the son of Shaphat shall stand on him this day. {32} But Elisha sat in his house, and the elders sat with him; and [the king] sent a man from before him: but ere the messenger came to him, he said to the elders, See ye how this son of a murderer hath sent to take away [cuwr:H5493] mine head? look, when the messenger cometh, shut the door, and hold him fast at the door: [is] not the sound of his master's [’adown:H113] feet behind him? {33} And while he yet talked with them, behold, the messenger came down unto him: and he said, Behold, this evil [is] of the LORD; what should I wait for the LORD any longer? {7:1} Then Elisha said, Hear ye the word of the LORD; Thus saith the LORD, To morrow about this time [shall] a measure of fine flour [be sold] for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, in the gate of Samaria. {2} Then a lord on whose hand the king leaned answered the man of God, and said, Behold, [if] the LORD would make windows in heaven, might this thing be? And he said, Behold, thou shalt see [it] with thine eyes, but shalt not eat thereof. ... {16} And the people went out, and spoiled the tents of the Syrians. So a measure of fine flour was [sold] for a shekel, and two measures of barley for a shekel, according to the word of the LORD. {17} And the king appointed the lord on whose hand he leaned to have the charge of the gate: and the people trode upon him in the gate, and he died, as the man of God had said, who spake when the king came down to him. {18} And it came to pass as the man of God had spoken to the king, saying, Two measures of barley for a shekel, and a measure of fine flour for a shekel, shall be to morrow about this time in the gate of Samaria: {19} And that lord answered the man of God, and said, Now, behold, [if] the LORD should make windows in heaven, might such a thing be? And he said, Behold, thou shalt see it with thine eyes, but shalt not eat thereof. {20} And so it fell out unto him: for the people trode upon him in the gate, and he died.”


The last reference in which these two terms are employed is in Isa 3:1 - a chapter that is speaking parabolically about the “end of the church age,” - typified by “Judah and Jerusalem” - and God’s judgment upon His external representation of the kingdom of God: 


“For, behold, the Lord [’adown:H113], the LORD of hosts, doth take away [cuwr:H5493]  from Jerusalem and from Judah the stay and the staff, the whole stay of bread, and the whole stay of water,”


A Further Focus On The Spiritual Significance Of Jael’s (And Heber’s) Tent [’ohel:H168]


Before considering set # 2, I want to reiterate and expand on what I mentioned in an earlier study about Heber and Jael’s tent. I’ve mentioned this a few times, but it bears repeating because 5 verses in Judges 4 (and one in Judges 5) refer to this tent, and because God is highlighting this, we want to make sure that we have a clear picture in our minds of its spiritual significance. In Part 15 we were looking at the two terms - “his tent” and “of Zaanaim”  in the latter part of Judges 4:11 which states,


“Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent [’ohel:H168] unto the plain of Zaanaim [Tsa`ananniym:H6815], which [is] by Kedesh.”


“Zaanaim” is the plural form of “tsa`an” (H6813), which appears only once as “[that] shall not be taken down” in verse 20 of Isaiah 33:20, in which both “Zion” and “Jerusalem” refer to the eternal kingdom of God:


“Look upon Zion, the city of our solemnities: thine eyes shall see Jerusalem a quiet habitation, a tabernacle [’ohel:H168] [that] shall not be taken down [tsa`an:H6813]; not one of the stakes thereof shall ever be removed, neither shall any of the cords thereof be broken. 


The “tent” or “tabernacle” also typifies the Lord Jesus Christ Himself, as He lovingly indwells His children, and they in Him, as Revelation 21:1-3 so beautifully highlights:


“And I saw a new heaven and a new earth: for the first heaven and the first earth were passed away; and there was no more sea. {2} And I John saw the holy city, new Jerusalem, coming down from God out of heaven, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband. {3} And I heard a great voice out of heaven saying, Behold, the tabernacle [skene:G4633] of God [is] with men, and he will dwell with them, and they shall be his people, and God himself shall be with them, [and be] their God.”  


So we see that the “tent” or “tabernacle” is a spiritual portrait of the Kingdom of God, and specifically, the Lord Jesus Christ, Who along with His elect (typified by Jael) are bringing judgment upon Satan (Sisera) and his kingdom. By keeping this truth in our thinking, we will be aided as we continue examining the rest of this chapter.


Set # 2: Turn In [cuwr:H5493] To Me; Fear [yare’:H3372] Not


Now let’s examine the two terms in Set # 2: Turn In [cuwr:H5493] To Me; Fear [yare’:H3372] Not. These two terms appear in 5 other places besides here in Judges 4, and they underscore Who one should truly fear (and Whose Word should be obeyed), in spite of the sins of God’s people corporately:


For example, these two words surface in verse 9 of Numbers 14:1-9 as: “neither fear”/ “[is] with us fear” and “is departed”: “And all the congregation lifted up their voice, and cried; and the people wept that night. {2} And all the children of Israel murmured against Moses and against Aaron: and the whole congregation said unto them, Would God that we had died in the land of Egypt! or would God we had died in this wilderness! {3} And wherefore hath the LORD brought us unto this land, to fall by the sword, that our wives and our children should be a prey? were it not better for us to return into Egypt? {4} And they said one to another, Let us make a captain, and let us return into Egypt. {5} Then Moses and Aaron fell on their faces before all the assembly of the congregation of the children of Israel. {6} And Joshua the son of Nun, and Caleb the son of Jephunneh, [which were] of them that searched the land, rent their clothes: {7} And they spake unto all the company of the children of Israel, saying, The land, which we passed through to search it, [is] an exceeding good land. {8} If the LORD delight in us, then he will bring us into this land, and give it us; a land which floweth with milk and honey. {9} Only rebel not ye against the LORD, neither fear [yare’:H3372]  ye the people of the land; for they [are] bread for us: their defence is departed [cuwr:H5493] from them, and the LORD [is] with us: fear [yare’:H3372] them not.”


Joshua 24:1-27 records the parting words of Joshua, under divine inspiration, prior to his death, in which he recounts the history of the nation, and gives them a number of charges; in verse 14 these two terms are rendered as “now therefore fear” along with “and put away”: “And Joshua gathered all the tribes of Israel to Shechem, and called for the elders of Israel, and for their heads, and for their judges, and for their officers; and they presented themselves before God. {2} And Joshua said unto all the people, Thus saith the LORD God of Israel, Your fathers dwelt on the other side of the flood in old time, [even] Terah, the father of Abraham, and the father of Nachor: and they served other gods. {3} And I took your father Abraham from the other side of the flood, and led him throughout all the land of Canaan, and multiplied his seed, and gave him Isaac. {4} And I gave unto Isaac Jacob and Esau: and I gave unto Esau mount Seir, to possess it; but Jacob and his children went down into Egypt. {5} I sent Moses also and Aaron, and I plagued Egypt, according to that which I did among them: and afterward I brought you out. {6} And I brought your fathers out of Egypt: and ye came unto the sea; and the Egyptians pursued after your fathers with chariots and horsemen unto the Red sea. {7} And when they cried unto the LORD, he put darkness between you and the Egyptians, and brought the sea upon them, and covered them; and your eyes have seen what I have done in Egypt: and ye dwelt in the wilderness a long season. {8}  And I brought you into the land of the Amorites, which dwelt on the other side Jordan; and they fought with you: and I gave them into your hand, that ye might possess their land; and I destroyed them from before you. {9} Then Balak the son of Zippor, king of Moab, arose and warred against Israel, and sent and called Balaam the son of Beor to curse you: {10} But I would not hearken unto Balaam; therefore he blessed you still: so I delivered you out of his hand. {11} And ye went over Jordan, and came unto Jericho: and the men of Jericho fought against you, the Amorites, and the Perizzites, and the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Girgashites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites; and I delivered them into your hand. {12} And I sent the hornet before you, which drave them out from before you, [even] the two kings of the Amorites; [but] not with thy sword, nor with thy bow. {13} And I have given you a land for which ye did not labour, and cities which ye built not, and ye dwell in them; of the vineyards and oliveyards which ye planted not do ye eat. {14} Now therefore fear [yare’:H3372] the LORD, and serve him in sincerity and in truth: and put away [cuwr:H5493] the gods which your fathers served on the other side of the flood, and in Egypt; and serve ye the LORD. {15} And if it seem evil unto you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served that [were] on the other side of the flood, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell: but as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD. {16} And the people answered and said, God forbid that we should forsake the LORD, to serve other gods; {17} For the LORD our God, he [it is] that brought us up and our fathers out of the land of Egypt, from the house of bondage, and which did those great signs in our sight, and preserved us in all the way wherein we went, and among all the people through whom we passed: {18} And the LORD drave out from before us all the people, even the Amorites which dwelt in the land: [therefore] will we also serve the LORD; for he [is] our God. {19} And Joshua said unto the people, Ye cannot serve the LORD: for he [is] an holy God; he [is] a jealous God; he will not forgive your transgressions nor your sins. {20} If ye forsake the LORD, and serve strange gods, then he will turn and do you hurt, and consume you, after that he hath done you good. {21} And the people said unto Joshua, Nay; but we will serve the LORD. {22} And Joshua said unto the people, Ye [are] witnesses against yourselves that ye have chosen you the LORD, to serve him. And they said, [We are] witnesses. {23} Now therefore put away, [said he], the strange gods which [are] among you, and incline your heart unto the LORD God of Israel. {24} And the people said unto Joshua, The LORD our God will we serve, and his voice will we obey. {25} So Joshua made a covenant with the people that day, and set them a statute and an ordinance in Shechem. {26} And Joshua wrote these words in the book of the law of God, and took a great stone, and set it up there under an oak, that [was] by the sanctuary of the LORD. {27} And Joshua said unto all the people, Behold, this stone shall be a witness unto us; for it hath heard all the words of the LORD which he spake unto us: it shall be therefore a witness unto you, lest ye deny your God.”



A similar situation to what I just read in Joshua 24 appears in 1 Samuel 12:6-25; and these two words appear as “fear” and “yet turn not aside” in verse 20: “And Samuel said unto the people, [It is] the LORD that advanced Moses and Aaron, and that brought your fathers up out of the land of Egypt. {7} Now therefore stand still, that I may reason with you before the LORD of all the righteous acts of the LORD, which he did to you and to your fathers. {8} When Jacob was come into Egypt, and your fathers cried unto the LORD, then the LORD sent Moses and Aaron, which brought forth your fathers out of Egypt, and made them dwell in this place. {9} And when they forgat the LORD their God, he sold them into the hand of Sisera, captain of the host of Hazor, and into the hand of the Philistines, and into the hand of the king of Moab, and they fought against them. {10} And they cried unto the LORD, and said, We have sinned, because we have forsaken the LORD, and have served Baalim and Ashtaroth: but now deliver us out of the hand of our enemies, and we will serve thee. {11} And the LORD sent Jerubbaal, and Bedan, and Jephthah, and Samuel, and delivered you out of the hand of your enemies on every side, and ye dwelled safe. {12} And when ye saw that Nahash the king of the children of Ammon came against you, ye said unto me, Nay; but a king shall reign over us: when the LORD your God [was] your king. {13} Now therefore behold the king whom ye have chosen, [and] whom ye have desired! and, behold, the LORD hath set a king over you. {14} If ye will fear the LORD, and serve him, and obey his voice, and not rebel against the commandment of the LORD, then shall both ye and also the king that reigneth over you continue following the LORD your God: {15} But if ye will not obey the voice of the LORD, but rebel against the commandment of the LORD, then shall the hand of the LORD be against you, as [it was] against your fathers. {16} Now therefore stand and see this great thing, which the LORD will do before your eyes. {17} [Is it] not wheat harvest to day? I will call unto the LORD, and he shall send thunder and rain; that ye may perceive and see that your wickedness [is] great, which ye have done in the sight of the LORD, in asking you a king. {18} So Samuel called unto the LORD; and the LORD sent thunder and rain that day: and all the people greatly feared the LORD and Samuel. {19} And all the people said unto Samuel, Pray for thy servants unto the LORD thy God, that we die not: for we have added unto all our sins [this] evil, to ask us a king. {20} And Samuel said unto the people, Fear [yare’:H3372]  not: ye have done all this wickedness: yet turn not aside [cuwr:H5493]   from following the LORD, but serve the LORD with all your heart; {21} And turn ye not aside: for [then should ye go] after vain [things], which cannot profit nor deliver; for they [are] vain. {22} For the LORD will not forsake his people for his great name's sake: because it hath pleased the LORD to make you his people. {23] Moreover as for me, God forbid that I should sin against the LORD in ceasing to pray for you: but I will teach you the good and the right way: {24} Only fear the LORD, and serve him in truth with all your heart: for consider how great [things] he hath done for you. {25} But if ye shall still do wickedly, ye shall be consumed, both ye and your king.”


In verse 12 of 1 Samuel 18:12, these two terms are translated as “was afraid” and “was with him, and was departed,” in this chapter which reveals King Saul’s spiritual conditions, and the circumstances which fueled his envy of David to the point of wanting to kill him on a continuous basis: “And Saul was afraid [yare’:H3372] of David, because the LORD was with him, and was departed [cuwr:H5493]  from Saul.”


On a sidenote, perhaps you noted the expression, “all the righteous acts of the LORD” in 1 Samuel 12:7, which Samuel then proceeds to list, even as Joshua did in Joshua 24. Throughout the Bible we find similar rehearsals of God’s mercy to His corporate people, as Stephen also testified in Acts 7, and especially to His elect, who were made righteous by the Faith and Work of the Lord Jesus Christ, “...from the foundation of the world.”


The last verse that includes these two words - translated as “fear” and “and depart” -  is verse 7 of Proverbs 3:5-7, which is a wonderful reminder for each of us every single day: 


“Trust in the LORD with all thine heart; and lean not unto thine own understanding. {6} In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths. {7} Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear  [yare’:H3372] the LORD, and depart [cuwr:H5493]  from evil.”


Well, it looks like we’ve come to the end of today’s lesson. Lord willing, we will continue to look at the rest of these entries in our next lesson.










Judges 4 - Part 24

Air Date: July 3, 2017


In our examination of Judges 4, we have come down to the last 7 verses of this intriguing chapter:


“And Jael went out to meet Sisera, and said unto him, Turn in, my lord, turn in to me; fear not. And when he had turned in unto her into the tent, she covered him with a mantle. {19} And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him. {20} Again he said unto her, Stand in the door of the tent, and it shall be, when any man doth come and enquire of thee, and say, Is there any man here? that thou shalt say, No. {21} Then Jael Heber's wife took a nail of the tent, and took an hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the nail into his temples, and fastened it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and weary. So he died. {22} And, behold, as Barak pursued Sisera, Jael came out to meet him, and said unto him, Come, and I will shew thee the man whom thou seekest. And when he came into her [tent], behold, Sisera lay dead, and the nail [was] in his temples. {23} So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel. {24} And the hand of the children of Israel prospered, and prevailed against Jabin the king of Canaan, until they had destroyed Jabin king of Canaan.”



Set # 3: And When He Had Turned In [cuwr:H5493] Unto Her Into The Tent [’ohel:H168]


Set # 3, also contains the term, “And when he had turned in” (yare’:H3372) along with term for “tent” or “tabernacle.” (’ohel:H168) Both of these words are found together in three other citations, and in keeping with the preceding sets, also accentuate the theme of judgment:



In verse 10 of Numbers 12:1-10, these words appear as “departed” and “from off the tabernacle”:And Miriam and Aaron spake against Moses because of the Ethiopian woman whom he had married: for he had married an Ethiopian woman. {2} And they said, Hath the LORD indeed spoken only by Moses? hath he not spoken also by us? And the LORD heard [it]. {3} (Now the man Moses [was] very meek, above all the men which [were] upon the face of the earth.) {4} And the LORD spake suddenly unto Moses, and unto Aaron, and unto Miriam, Come out ye three unto the tabernacle of the congregation. And they three came out. {5} And the LORD came down in the pillar of the cloud, and stood [in] the door of the tabernacle, and called Aaron and Miriam: and they both came forth. {6} And he said, Hear now my words: If there be a prophet among you, [I] the LORD will make myself known unto him in a vision, [and] will speak unto him in a dream. {7} My servant Moses [is] not so, who [is] faithful in all mine house. {8} With him will I speak mouth to mouth, even apparently, and not in dark speeches; and the similitude of the LORD shall he behold: wherefore then were ye not afraid to speak against my servant Moses? {9} And the anger of the LORD was kindled against them; and he departed. {10} And the cloud departed [cuwr:H5493] from off the tabernacle [’ohel:H168]; and, behold, Miriam [became] leprous, [white] as snow: and Aaron looked upon Miriam, and, behold, [she was] leprous.”


The next reference is is verse 26 of Numbers 16:23-34, in which these two terms are rendered as “depart” and “I pray you, from the tents”: 


“And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {24} Speak unto the congregation, saying, Get you up from about the tabernacle of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram. {25} And Moses rose up and went unto Dathan and Abiram; and the elders of Israel followed him. {26} And he spake unto the congregation, saying, Depart [cuwr:H5493], I pray you, from the tents [’ohel:H168] of these wicked men, and touch nothing of theirs, lest ye be consumed in all their sins. {27} So they gat up from the tabernacle of Korah, Dathan, and Abiram, on every side: and Dathan and Abiram came out, and stood in the door of their tents, and their wives, and their sons, and their little children. {28} And Moses said, Hereby ye shall know that the LORD hath sent me to do all these works; for [I have] not [done them] of mine own mind. {29} If these men die the common death of all men, or if they be visited after the visitation of all men; [then] the LORD hath not sent me. {30} But if the LORD make a new thing, and the earth open her mouth, and swallow them up, with all that [appertain] unto them, and they go down quick into the pit; then ye shall understand that these men have provoked the LORD. {31} And it came to pass, as he had made an end of speaking all these words, that the ground clave asunder that [was] under them: {32} And the earth opened her mouth, and swallowed them up, and their houses, and all the men that [appertained] unto Korah, and all [their] goods. {33} They, and all that [appertained] to them, went down alive into the pit, and the earth closed upon them: and they perished from among the congregation. {34} And all Israel that [were] round about them fled at the cry of them: for they said, Lest the earth swallow us up [also].”


The last passage in which we find these two words are verse 8 of Judges 20:1-8, which is a continuation of the historical parable that began in Judges 19 with regard to the “death of the concubine,” which exemplifies the death of the New Testament institutional churches and denominations as of May 21, 1988,


“Then all the children of Israel went out, and the congregation was gathered together as one man, from Dan even to Beersheba, with the land of Gilead, unto the LORD in Mizpeh. {2} And the chief of all the people, [even] of all the tribes of Israel, presented themselves in the assembly of the people of God, four hundred thousand footmen that drew sword. {3} (Now the children of Benjamin heard that the children of Israel were gone up to Mizpeh.) Then said the children of Israel, Tell [us], how was this wickedness? {4} And the Levite, the husband of the woman that was slain, answered and said, I came into Gibeah that [belongeth] to Benjamin, I and my concubine, to lodge. {5} And the men of Gibeah rose against me, and beset the house round about upon me by night, [and] thought to have slain me: and my concubine have they forced, that she is dead. {6} And I took my concubine, and cut her in pieces, and sent her throughout all the country of the inheritance of Israel: for they have committed lewdness and folly in Israel. {7} Behold, ye [are] all children of Israel; give here your advice and counsel. {8} And all the people arose as one man, saying, We will not any [of us] go to his tent [’ohel:H168], neither will we any [of us] turn [cuwr:H5493] into his house.”


She Covered [kacah:H3680] Him With A Mantle [semiykah:H8063]


We are down to the last two Hebrew words in verse 18, “she covered” and “with a mantle.”  These terms do not appear together, except in this verse, so we will have to consider them individually:


 Him With A Mantle [semiykah:H8063]


This word, “him with a mantle” is only found here, so let’s see if its root word helps us to understand the spiritual picture that God has hidden within this account. We understand that in the historical context, this might have been a blanket of some kind so that Sisera would be able to sleep somewhat comfortably for a short time...until his demise. Its root word (camak:H5564) is translated in the following ways:  “lay(18x),uphold(9x), put (5x), lean (3x), stay (3x), sustained (3x), and once as: holden up,” “ borne up,” “established,” “stand fast,” “lieth hard,” “rested,” and set.” Here are some examples of how God utilizes this term:


In an earlier study with regard to Jael (Ya`el:H3278) [whose name is identical to “wild goat” (ya`el:H3277)] we were directed to this passage in Leviticus 16 that outlines what was to be done with two goats - “the LORD’s goat” (picturing Christ’s sacrifice for His elect people) and the “scapegoat” as we read about here in verse 21: 


“And Aaron shall lay [camak:H5564] both his hands upon the head of the live goat, and confess over him all the iniquities of the children of Israel, and all their transgressions in all their sins, putting them upon the head of the goat, and shall send [him] away by the hand of a fit man into the wilderness:”


In similar fashion, in verse 14 of Leviticus 24:10-16, the Bible presents the fate of a man who had cursed the LORD, and the penalty God prescribed for his sin; this word is rendered as “[him] lay”: “And the son of an Israelitish woman, whose father [was] an Egyptian, went out among the children of Israel: and this son of the Israelitish [woman] and a man of Israel strove together in the camp; {11} And the Israelitish woman's son blasphemed the name [of the LORD], and cursed. And they brought him unto Moses: (and his mother's name [was] Shelomith, the daughter of Dibri, of the tribe of Dan:) {12} And they put him in ward, that the mind of the LORD might be shewed them. {13} And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying,  {14} Bring forth him that hath cursed without the camp; and let all that heard [him] lay [camak:H5564] their hands upon his head, and let all the congregation stone him. {15} And thou shalt speak unto the children of Israel, saying, Whosoever curseth his God shall bear his sin. {16} And he that blasphemeth the name of the LORD, he shall surely be put to death, [and] all the congregation shall certainly stone him: as well the stranger, as he that is born in the land, when he blasphemeth the name [of the LORD], shall be put to death.”


This term can also be used in a positive way as Numbers 27:18 and 23 reveal  God’s choice for Moses’ successor, Joshua (a great type or figure of the Lord Jesus Christ himself); it is expressed as “and lay” and “And he laid” respectively:: “And the LORD said unto Moses, Take thee Joshua the son of Nun, a man in whom [is] the spirit, and lay [camak:H5564]  thine hand upon him; ... {23} And he laid [camak:H5564] his hands upon him, and gave him a charge, as the LORD commanded by the hand of Moses.”


This is also the case in Psalm 3:5, in which this word is rendered as “sustained”: “I laid me down and slept; I awaked; for the LORD sustained  [camak:H5564] me.”


However in Psalm 88:7, it is again employed as God’s wrath - pointing to Christ’s atonement, “...from the foundation of the world”: “Thy wrath lieth hard [camak:H5564] upon me, and thou hast afflicted [me] with all thy waves. Selah.”


Ezekiel 24:2, likewise, is focused on God’s wrath against His corporate people (Judah and Jerusalem - who typify the New Testament churches and denominations that came under God’s judgment on May 21, 1988): “Son of man, write thee the name of the day, [even] of this same day: the king of Babylon set [camak:H5564] himself against Jerusalem this same day.” 


So we see that the “mantle” that Jael placed upon Sisera (a spiritual portrayal of Satan) was in effect a death sentence for him, even as Satan was vanquished at the end of the Great Tribulation on May 21, 2011, by the Lord Jesus Christ, who began His rule of judgment on planet earth during our present prolonged “day of judgment.” 


She Covered [kacah:H3680]


Let’s now turn our attention to this word, “she covered” (kacah:H3580)


Referring to the plague of locusts in Exodus 10:15, this term is translated as “For they covered”: “For they covered [kacah:H3680] the face of the whole earth, so that the land was darkened; and they did eat every herb of the land, and all the fruit of the trees which the hail had left: and there remained not any green thing in the trees, or in the herbs of the field, through all the land of Egypt.”


The defeat of Pharaoh Thutmosis III and the entire Egyptian army is chronicled in Exodus 15:5 and 10, in which this word is also expressed as “covered”: “The depths have covered [kacah:H3680] them: they sank into the bottom as a stone. ... {10} Thou didst blow with thy wind, the sea covered [kacah:H3680]  them: they sank as lead in the mighty waters.”


Earlier in today’s study, I quoted from Numbers 16 with regard to God’s judgment upon Korah, Dathan, and Abiram and their households; our word is rendered as “closed” in verse 33:  “They, and all that [appertained] to them, went down alive into the pit, and the earth closed [kacah:H3680] upon them: and they perished from among the congregation.”


Similarly, Psalm 106:17 references this same account, and renderes this word as “and covered”: “The earth opened and swallowed up Dathan, and covered [kacah:H3680] the company of Abiram.”


In verse 26 of Job 21:18-26, one sees the destiny of the wicked:  “How oft is the candle of the wicked put out! and [how oft] cometh their destruction upon them! [God] distributeth sorrows in his anger. {18} They are as stubble before the wind, and as chaff that the storm carrieth away. {19} God layeth up his iniquity for his children: he rewardeth him, and he shall know [it]. {20} His eyes shall see his destruction, and he shall drink of the wrath of the Almighty. {21} For what pleasure [hath] he in his house after him, when the number of his months is cut off in the midst? {22} Shall [any] teach God knowledge? seeing he judgeth those that are high. {23} One dieth in his full strength, being wholly at ease and quiet.  {24} His breasts are full of milk, and his bones are moistened with marrow. {25} And another dieth in the bitterness of his soul, and never eateth with pleasure.{26} They shall lie down alike in the dust, and the worms shall cover [kacah:H3680] them.”


Lastly, in verse 42 of Jeremiah 51:35-58 we witness another portrait of the defeat of Babylon - representing Satan’s kingdom (even as both Nebuchadrezzar as well as Sisera typify him): “The violence done to me and to my flesh [be] upon Babylon, shall the inhabitant of Zion say; and my blood upon the inhabitants of Chaldea, shall Jerusalem say. {36} Therefore thus saith the LORD; Behold, I will plead thy cause, and take vengeance for thee; and I will dry up her sea, and make her springs dry. {37} And Babylon shall become heaps, a dwellingplace for dragons, an astonishment, and an hissing, without an inhabitant. {38} They shall roar together like lions: they shall yell as lions' whelps. {39} In their heat I will make their feasts, and I will make them drunken, that they may rejoice, and sleep a perpetual sleep, and not wake, saith the LORD. {40} I will bring them down like lambs to the slaughter, like rams with he goats. {41} How is Sheshach taken! and how is the praise of the whole earth surprised! how is Babylon become an astonishment among the nations! {42} The sea is come up upon Babylon: she is covered [kacah:H3680] with the multitude of the waves thereof. {43} Her cities are a desolation, a dry land, and a wilderness, a land wherein no man dwelleth, neither doth [any] son of man pass thereby. {44} And I will punish Bel in Babylon, and I will bring forth out of his mouth that which he hath swallowed up: and the nations shall not flow together any more unto him: yea, the wall of Babylon shall fall. {45} My people, go ye out of the midst of her, and deliver ye every man his soul from the fierce anger of the LORD. {46} And lest your heart faint, and ye fear for the rumour that shall be heard in the land; a rumour shall both come [one] year, and after that in [another] year [shall come] a rumour, and violence in the land, ruler against ruler. {47} Therefore, behold, the days come, that I will do judgment upon the graven images of Babylon: and her whole land shall be confounded, and all her slain shall fall in the midst of her. {48} Then the heaven and the earth, and all that [is] therein, shall sing for Babylon: for the spoilers shall come unto her from the north, saith the LORD. {49} As Babylon [hath caused] the slain of Israel to fall, so at Babylon shall fall the slain of all the earth. {50} Ye that have escaped the sword, go away, stand not still: remember the LORD afar off, and let Jerusalem come into your mind. {51} We are confounded, because we have heard reproach: shame hath covered our faces: for strangers are come into the sanctuaries of the LORD'S house. {52} Wherefore, behold, the days come, saith the LORD, that I will do judgment upon her graven images: and through all her land the wounded shall groan. {53} Though Babylon should mount up to heaven, and though she should fortify the height of her strength, [yet] from me shall spoilers come unto her, saith the LORD. {54} A sound of a cry [cometh] from Babylon, and great destruction from the land of the Chaldeans: {55} Because the LORD hath spoiled Babylon, and destroyed out of her the great voice; when her waves do roar like great waters, a noise of their voice is uttered: {56} Because the spoiler is come upon her, [even] upon Babylon, and her mighty men are taken, every one of their bows is broken: for the LORD God of recompences shall surely requite. {57} And I will make drunk her princes, and her wise [men], her captains, and her rulers, and her mighty men: and they shall sleep a perpetual sleep, and not wake, saith the King, whose name [is] the LORD of hosts. {58} Thus saith the LORD of hosts; The broad walls of Babylon shall be utterly broken, and her high gates shall be burned with fire; and the people shall labour in vain, and the folk in the fire, and they shall be weary.” 


It looks like we’ll have to stop here today. Lord willing, we will continue our examination of Judges 4 in our next lesson.