Bible Ministries International

Bible Studies

A series of verse by verse studies by Gunther von Harringa Sr

Act 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

Text Studies

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Judges 4 - Part 1

Air Date: April 24, 2017



“And the children of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD, when Ehud was dead. {2} And the LORD sold them into the hand of Jabin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor; the captain of whose host [was] Sisera, which dwelt in Harosheth of the Gentiles. {3} And the children of Israel cried unto the LORD: for he had nine hundred chariots of iron; and twenty years he mightily oppressed the children of Israel {4} And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment. {6} And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go and draw toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand. {8} And Barak said unto her, If thou wilt go with me, then I will go: but if thou wilt not go with me, [then] I will not go. {9} And she said, I will surely go with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman. And Deborah arose, and went with Barak to Kedesh. {10} And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon. {14} And Deborah said unto Barak, Up; for this [is] the day in which the LORD hath delivered Sisera into thine hand: is not the LORD gone out before thee? So Barak went down from mount Tabor, and ten thousand men after him. {15} And the LORD discomfited Sisera, and all [his] chariots, and all [his] host, with the edge of the sword before Barak; so that Sisera lighted down off [his] chariot, and fled away on his feet. {16} But Barak pursued after the chariots, and after the host, unto Harosheth of the Gentiles: and all the host of Sisera fell upon the edge of the sword; [and] there was not a man left. {17] Howbeit Sisera fled away on his feet to the tent of Jael the wife of Heber the Kenite: for [there was] peace between Jabin the king of Hazor and the house of Heber the Kenite. {18} And Jael went out to meet Sisera, and said unto him, Turn in, my lord, turn in to me; fear not. And when he had turned in unto her into the tent, she covered him with a mantle. {19} And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him. {20] Again he said unto her, Stand in the door of the tent, and it shall be, when any man doth come and enquire of thee, and say, Is there any man here? that thou shalt say, No. {21] Then Jael Heber's wife took a nail of the tent, and took an hammer in her hand, and went softly unto him, and smote the nail into his temples, and fastened it into the ground: for he was fast asleep and weary. So he died. {22} And, behold, as Barak pursued Sisera, Jael came out to meet him, and said unto him, Come, and I will shew thee the man whom thou seekest. And when he came into her [tent], behold, Sisera lay dead, and the nail [was] in his temples. {23} So God subdued on that day Jabin the king of Canaan before the children of Israel. {24} And the hand of the children of Israel prospered, and prevailed against Jabin the king of Canaan, until they had destroyed Jabin king of Canaan.”


And The Children [ben:H1121] Of Israel [Yisra’el:H3468] Again [yacaph:H3254] Did [`asah:H6213] Evil [ra`:H7451] In The Sight [`ayin:H5869] Of The LORD [Yehovah:H3068]


This new chapter in the book of Judges begins with a familiar refrain in verse 1, following the death of Ehud: “And the children of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD...” Once again God is focusing in on the main theme that runs throughout the book of Judges, namely: “rebellion>oppression>deliverance>rest.” We saw this exact phrase in Jud 3:12...


And the children [ben:H1121] of Israel [Yisra’el:H3468] did [`asah:H6213] evil [ra`:H7451] again [yacaph:H3254] in the sight [`ayin:H5869] of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]: and the LORD strengthened Eglon the king of Moab against Israel, because they had done evil in the sight of the LORD.”


And we will see this repeated in both Jud 10:6-7, and 13:1 respectively, Lord willing:


And the children [ben:H1121] of Israel [Yisra’el:H3468] did [`asah:H6213] evil [ra`:H7451] again [yacaph:H3254] in the sight [`ayin:H5869] of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068], and served Baalim, and Ashtaroth, and the gods of Syria, and the gods of Zidon, and the gods of Moab, and the gods of the children of Ammon, and the gods of the Philistines, and forsook the LORD, and served not him. {7} And the anger of the LORD was hot against Israel, and he sold them into the hands of the Philistines, and into the hands of the children of Ammon.”


And the children [ben:H1121] of Israel [Yisra’el:H3468] did [`asah:H6213] evil [ra`:H7451] again [yacaph:H3254] in the sight [`ayin:H5869] of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068]; and the LORD delivered them into the hand of the Philistines forty years. {7} And the anger of the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] was hot against Israel, and he sold [makar:H4376] them into the hands [yad:H3027] of the Philistines, and into the hands of the children of Ammon.”


And The LORD [Yehovah:H3068] Sold [makar:H4376] Them Into The Hand [yad:H3027] Of Jabin King Of Canaan, That Reigned In Hazor


As a result of Israel’s rebellion, God sees fit to once again engage the next gear in the cycle - “oppression” - as Jud 4:2a, which is comprised of three other Hebrew terms, which we have seen before in Jud 2, 3, and in Jud 10:7, which I quoted a minute ago:


And the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] sold [makar:H4376] them into the hand [yad:H3027] of Jabin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor…


The same three terms also surface in Jud 4:9, but not in the same context of “oppression,” but rather in “deliverance,” as this chapter, (and the continuation in chapter 5) introduces us to the next Judge - a woman by the name of Deborah - another historical parable that provides further understanding and corroboration of our present “day of judgment”: “And she [Deborah] said, I will surely go with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou [Barak] takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] shall sell [makar:H4376] Sisera into the hand [yad:H3027] of a woman [Jael]. And Deborah arose, and went with Barak to Kedesh.”


There is also an interesting summary that Samuel, under divine inspiration, presents to the nation in 1 Sam 12:6-11, in which these same three words are utilized in verse 9: “And Samuel said unto the people, [It is] the LORD that advanced Moses and Aaron, and that brought your fathers up out of the land of Egypt. {7} Now therefore stand still, that I may reason with you before the LORD of all the righteous acts of the LORD, which he did to you and to your fathers. {8} When Jacob was come into Egypt, and your fathers cried unto the LORD, then the LORD sent Moses and Aaron, which brought forth your fathers out of Egypt, and made them dwell in this place. {9} And when they forgat the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] their God, he sold them [makar:H4376] into the hand [yad:H3027] of Sisera, captain of the host of Hazor, and into the hand [yad:H3027] of the Philistines, and into the hand [yad:H3027] of the king of Moab, and they fought against them. {10} And they cried unto the LORD, and said, We have sinned, because we have forsaken the LORD, and have served Baalim and Ashtaroth: but now deliver us out of the hand of our enemies, and we will serve thee. {11} And the LORD sent Jerubbaal [i.e., Gideon], and Bedan, and Jephthah, and Samuel, and delivered you out of the hand of your enemies on every side, and ye dwelled safe.”


Jabin King Of Canaan, That Reigned In Hazor


Chapter 4 deals overwhelmingly with Sisera, the general (or “captain”) of Jabin, king of Canaan’s army, even as 1 Sam 12:9 refers, not to Jabin the king, but rather to Sisera: 


“And when they forgat the LORD [Yehovah:H3068] their God, he sold them [makar:H4376] into the hand [yad:H3027] of Sisera, captain of the host of Hazor, and into the hand [yad:H3027] of the Philistines, and into the hand [yad:H3027] of the king of Moab, and they fought against them.”


The Captain Of Whose Host [Was] Sisera, Which Dwelt In Harosheth Of The Gentiles


Sisera (Ciycera:H5516) appears 21 times in the Old Testament, and is one of the protagonists in Judges 4 and 5, along with Judge Deborah, Barak, and Jael. Most of the references to Sisera occur in these two chapters, but similar to Samuel rehearsing and highlighting some of Israel’s history, we also read the following account in Psa 83:1-18, which makes mention of Sisera in verse 9; this Psalm is one in which God is being beseeched to take vengeance on His enemies - on all the non-elect who oppose His holy and just rule. Actually, this is exactly what is taking plave today, during this prolonged day of judgment, in which God has shut the door to salvation (since all the elect have been saved), and the world is under His divine wrath, and are being judged for their sins, which will culminate in the destruction of this world and universe, and usher in the New Heavens and New Earth:


“[A Song [or] Psalm of Asaph.] Keep not thou silence, O God: hold not thy peace, and be not still, O God. {2} For, lo, thine enemies make a tumult: and they that hate thee have lifted up the head. {3} They have taken crafty counsel against thy people, and consulted against thy hidden ones. {4} They have said, Come, and let us cut them off from [being] a nation; that the name of Israel may be no more in remembrance. {5} For they have consulted together with one consent: they are confederate against thee: {6} The tabernacles of Edom, and the Ishmaelites; of Moab, and the Hagarenes; {7} Gebal, and Ammon, and Amalek; the Philistines with the inhabitants of Tyre; {8} Assur also is joined with them: they have holpen the children of Lot. Selah. {9} Do unto them as [unto] the Midianites; as [to] Sisera, as [to] Jabin, at the brook of Kison: {10} [Which] perished at Endor: they became [as] dung for the earth. {11} Make their nobles like Oreb, and like Zeeb: yea, all their princes as Zebah, and as Zalmunna: {12} Who said, Let us take to ourselves the houses of God in possession. {13}| O my God, make them like a wheel; as the stubble before the wind. {14} As the fire burneth a wood, and as the flame setteth the mountains on fire; {15} So persecute them with thy tempest, and make them afraid with thy storm. {16} Fill their faces with shame; that they may seek thy name, O LORD. {17} Let them be confounded and troubled for ever; yea, let them be put to shame, and perish: {18} That [men] may know that thou, whose name alone [is] JEHOVAH, [art] the most high over all the earth.” 


Lord willing, in our next study, we will learn more about this man, Sisera, and his army.









Judges 4 - Part 2

Air Date: April 26, 2017



“And the children of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD, when Ehud was dead. {2} And the LORD sold them into the hand of Jabin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor; the captain of whose host [was] Sisera, which dwelt in Harosheth of the Gentiles. {3} And the children of Israel cried unto the LORD: for he had nine hundred chariots of iron; and twenty years he mightily oppressed the children of Israel {4} And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time.”


The Captain [sar:H8269] Of Whose Host [tsaba`:H6635] Was Sisera [Ciycera:H5516]


We have begun Judges 4, and we want to take a closer look at this man Sisera, who was the “captain” of the army of Jabin, king of Canaan, as verse two stated. The term “captain” (sar:H8629) is found 421 times in the Old Testament (according to the blueletterbible.org), and is rendered predominantly  as “prince,” “captain,” “chief,” and “ruler,” as the following verses demonstrate:


Isa 9:6 declares, “For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be upon his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counsellor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince [sar:H8269] of Peace.”


In Jud 4:7 we also find this term repeated, and it surfaces throughout the rest of the book of Judges, from this chapter onwards: “And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain [sar:H8269] of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


Gen 40:2-4, 9, 16, and 20-23, and appears the most of any chapter in the Bible, and is also a historical parable in its own right: 


“And Pharaoh was wroth against two [of] his officers, against the chief [sar:H8269] of the butlers, and against the chief [sar:H8269] of the bakers. {3} And he put them in ward in the house of the captain [sar:H8269]of the guard, into the prison, the place where Joseph [was] bound. {4} And the captain [sar:H8269] of the guard charged Joseph with them, and he served them: and they continued a season in ward. ... {9} And the chief [sar:H8269] butler told his dream to Joseph, and said to him, In my dream, behold, a vine [was] before me; ... {16} When the chief [sar:H8269] baker saw that the interpretation was good, he said unto Joseph, I also [was] in my dream, and, behold, [I had] three white baskets on my head: ... {20} And it came to pass the third day, [which was] Pharaoh's birthday, that he made a feast unto all his servants: and he lifted up the head of the chief [sar:H8269] butler and of the chief [sar:H8269] baker among his servants. {21} And he restored the chief [sar:H8269] butler unto his butlership again; and he gave the cup into Pharaoh's hand: {22} But he hanged the chief [sar:H8269] baker: as Joseph had interpreted to them. {23} Yet did not the chief [sar:H8269] butler remember Joseph, but forgat him.”


In Exo 18:21, this term appears as “rulers” 4 times:  “Moreover thou shalt provide out of all the people able men, such as fear God, men of truth, hating covetousness; and place [such] over them, [to be] rulers [sar:H8269] of thousands, [and] rulers [H8269] of hundreds, rulers [H8269] of fifties, and rulers [H8269] of tens:”

 

The root word for (sar:H8269), which is “sarar” (H8323) is found in Pro 8:16, and translated as “rule,”  along with “sar” (H8269) which is rendered as “princes,”: “By me princes [sar:H8269] rule [sarar:H8323], and nobles, [even] all the judges of the earth.”


Which Dwelt [yashab:H3427] In Harosheth [Charosheth:H2800] Of The Gentiles (or “Nations”) [gowy:H1471] 


According to the last half of verse 2, Sisera “...dwelt in Harosheth of the Gentiles.” The two words “Harosheth” and “of the Gentiles” is curiously only found in this chapter, and is mentioned two other times (in verses 13 and 16) besides here in verse 3, for a total of three times, indicating the “purpose of God”: 


“And the LORD sold them into the hand of Jabin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor; the captain of whose host [was] Sisera, which dwelt in Harosheth [Charosheth:H2800] of the Gentiles [gowy:H1471] ....{13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth [Charosheth:H2800] of the Gentiles [gowy:H1471] unto the river of Kishon. ... {16} But Barak pursued after the chariots, and after the host, unto Harosheth [Charosheth:H2800] of the Gentiles [gowy:H1471]: and all the host of Sisera fell upon the edge of the sword; [and] there was not a man left.”


Sisera’s Army


Notice too, the repetition of the “...nine hundred chariots of iron,” as in verse 3,

“And the children of Israel cried unto the LORD: for he had nine hundred chariots of iron; and twenty years he mightily oppressed the children of Israel.” 


These two words, “chariots” (rekeb:H7393) and “of iron” (barzel:H1270) also appear in other citations in the Old Testament:


For example, these two terms are found in verses Jos 17:14-18, “And the children of Joseph spake unto Joshua, saying, Why hast thou given me [but] one lot and one portion to inherit, seeing I [am] a great people, forasmuch as the LORD hath blessed me hitherto? {15} And Joshua answered them, If thou [be] a great people, [then] get thee up to the wood [country], and cut down for thyself there in the land of the Perizzites and of the giants, if mount Ephraim be too narrow for thee. {16} And the children of Joseph said, The hill is not enough for us: and all the Canaanites that dwell in the land of the valley have chariots [rekeb:H7393] of iron [barzel:H1270], [both they] who [are] of Bethshean and her towns, and [they] who [are] of the valley of Jezreel. {17} And Joshua spake unto the house of Joseph, [even] to Ephraim and to Manasseh, saying, Thou [art] a great people, and hast great power: thou shalt not have one lot [only]: {18} But the mountain shall be thine; for it [is] a wood, and thou shalt cut it down: and the outgoings of it shall be thine: for thou shalt drive out the Canaanites, though they have iron [barzel:H1270] chariots [rekeb:H7393], [and] though they [be] strong.”


This was also corroborated in our study of Judges chapter 1, in verse 19: “And the LORD was with Judah; and he drave out [the inhabitants of] the mountain; but could not drive out the inhabitants of the valley, because they had chariots [rekeb:H7393] of iron.” [barzel:H1270] 


And Twenty Years He Mightily [chozqah:H2394] Oppressed [lachats:H3905] The Children Of Israel


I have mentioned repeatedly throughout this series that the main historical theme that runs through this book is this cycle of “rebellion>oppression>deliverance>rest,” and in verse 3, we find this very word “oppressed” (lachats:H3905), along with its Hebrew modifier, mightily” (chozqah:H2394 - in English we would classify it as an adverb, but in Hebrew it is a noun). The term, “oppression”  is found 19 times and is rendered in the following ways: oppress(13x), afflict(1x),crushed (1x), fast (1x), forced(1x), oppressors(1x), and once as thrust.” Here are a few examples of how God uses this word:


In Jud 2:18 we encountered this term translated as “by reason of them that oppressed” in explaining the third stage,“deliverance,” in the cycle:  “And when the LORD raised them up judges, then the LORD was with the judge, and delivered them out of the hand of their enemies all the days of the judge: for it repented the LORD because of their groanings by reason of them that oppressed [lachats:H3905] them and vexed them.”



In verse 42 of Psa 106:34-42, this word is rendered as “also oppressed”:  

“They did not destroy the nations, concerning whom the LORD commanded them:{35} But were mingled among the heathen, and learned their works. {36} And they served their idols: which were a snare unto them. {37} Yea, they sacrificed their sons and their daughters unto devils, {38} And shed innocent blood, [even] the blood of their sons and of their daughters, whom they sacrificed unto the idols of Canaan: and the land was polluted with blood. {39} Thus were they defiled with their own works, and went a whoring with their own inventions. {40} Therefore was the wrath of the LORD kindled against his people, insomuch that he abhorred his own inheritance. {41} And he gave them into the hand of the heathen; and they that hated them ruled over them. {42} Their enemies also oppressed [lachats:H3905] them, and they were brought into subjection under their hand.”


This word is also used in connection with Israel’s bondage in Egypt in verse 9 of Exo 3:6-10, in which it is rendered as “oppress” as God’s lays out His will for Moses, concerning the nation: “Moreover he said, I [am] the God of thy father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. And Moses hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God. {7} And the LORD said, I have surely seen the affliction of my people which [are] in Egypt, and have heard their cry by reason of their taskmasters; for I know their sorrows; {8} And I am come down to deliver them out of the hand of the Egyptians, and to bring them up out of that land unto a good land and a large, unto a land flowing with milk and honey; unto the place of the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Amorites, and the Perizzites, and the Hivites, and the Jebusites. {9} Now therefore, behold, the cry of the children of Israel is come unto me: and I have also seen the oppression [lachats:H3906] wherewith the Egyptians oppress [lachats:H3905]them. {10} Come now therefore, and I will send thee unto Pharaoh, that thou mayest bring forth my people the children of Israel out of Egypt.”


By the way, the identically spelled derivative of “oppress” also appears in verse 9 as “the oppression.”


The term, “mightily” pinpoints the tremendous suffering that Israel was subjected to, not only in Egypt for hundreds of years, but throughout the entire 360 year period of the book of Judges. 


We will take a closer look at this word in our next study.









Judges 4 - Part 3

Air Date: April 28, 2017



“And the children of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD, when Ehud was dead. {2} And the LORD sold them into the hand of Jabin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor; the captain of whose host [was] Sisera, which dwelt in Harosheth of the Gentiles. {3} And the children of Israel cried unto the LORD: for he had nine hundred chariots of iron; and twenty years he mightily oppressed the children of Israel. {4} And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment.”


And Twenty Years He Mightily [chozqah:H2394] Oppressed [lachats:H3905] The Children of Israel (Cont.)


In our last study we looked at the term, “oppressed”(lachats:H3905) as found in Jud 4:3 with respect to Sisera, in the phrase: “... and twenty years he mightily oppressed the children of Israel.” We noted how God uses this term to illustrate His judgments upon Israel for their disobedience, by utilizing the other heathen nations round about them to subjugate them in the cycle of “rebellion>oppression>deliverance>rest.” I also said that we would investigate the word, “mightily” (chozqah:H2394) which reveals the degree of domination that Israel had to endure. Its is employed five other times (besides here in Jud 4:3) and in the following ways:force(2x), mightily(2x), sharply (1x), and once as repair,” as the subsequent passages exemplify:


Jud 8:1, translates it as, “with him sharply,” describing the severity of the “chiding” that the men of Ephraim expressed to Gideon: “And the men of Ephraim said unto him, Why hast thou served us thus, that thou calledst us not, when thou wentest to fight with the Midianites? And they did chide with him sharply.” [chozqah:H2394]


In verse 12 of 1 Sam 2:12-17 it is rendered as “[it] by force,” in portraying the unbridled wickedness of Eli’s sons, who along with their timid father, were the religious leaders in Israel of that day, and serve to spiritually epitomize the apostate, end-time institutional churches of our day, that came under the wrath of God as of May 21, 1988: 


“Now the sons of Eli [were] sons of Belial; they knew not the LORD. {13} And the priests' custom with the people [was, that], when any man offered sacrifice, the priest's servant came, while the flesh was in seething, with a fleshhook of three teeth in his hand; {14} And he struck [it] into the pan, or kettle, or caldron, or pot; all that the fleshhook brought up the priest took for himself. So they did in Shiloh unto all the Israelites that came thither. {15} Also before they burnt the fat, the priest's servant came, and said to the man that sacrificed, Give flesh to roast for the priest; for he will not have sodden flesh of thee, but raw. {16} And [if] any man said unto him, Let them not fail to burn the fat presently, and [then] take [as much] as thy soul desireth; then he would answer him, [Nay]; but thou shalt give [it me] now: and if not, I will take [it] by force. [chozqah:H2394] {17} Wherefore the sin of the young men was very great before the LORD: for men abhorred the offering of the LORD.”


A similar portrayal is found in verse 4 of Eze 34:1-10, in which is is translated as, “but with force” (notice too, the next word, “and with cruelty”); like Mat 23, or Jer 23, this chapter is a scathing denunciation aimed at the religious leaders of national Israel, and its spiritual counterpart, the New Testament churches and denominations: 


“And the word of the LORD came unto me, saying, {2} Son of man, prophesy against the shepherds of Israel, prophesy, and say unto them, Thus saith the Lord GOD unto the shepherds; Woe [be] to the shepherds of Israel that do feed themselves! should not the shepherds feed the flocks? {3} Ye eat the fat, and ye clothe you with the wool, ye kill them that are fed: [but] ye feed not the flock. {4} The diseased have ye not strengthened, neither have ye healed that which was sick, neither have ye bound up [that which was] broken, neither have ye brought again that which was driven away, neither have ye sought that which was lost; but with force [chozqah:H2394] and with cruelty have ye ruled them. {5} And they were scattered, because [there is] no shepherd: and they became meat to all the beasts of the field, when they were scattered. {6} My sheep wandered through all the mountains, and upon every high hill: yea, my flock was scattered upon all the face of the earth, and none did search or seek [after them]. {7} Therefore, ye shepherds, hear the word of the LORD; {8} [As] I live, saith the Lord GOD, surely because my flock became a prey, and my flock became meat to every beast of the field, because [there was] no shepherd, neither did my shepherds search for my flock, but the shepherds fed themselves, and fed not my flock; {9} Therefore, O ye shepherds, hear the word of the LORD; {10} Thus saith the Lord GOD; Behold, I [am] against the shepherds; and I will require my flock at their hand, and cause them to cease from feeding the flock; neither shall the shepherds feed themselves any more; for I will deliver my flock from their mouth, that they may not be meat for them.” 


On the other hand, in verse 8 of Jon 3: 4-10, the gist of this word is seen from a positive standpoint, but with the same single-minded intensity; it is expressed as “mightily”: “And Jonah began to enter into the city a day's journey, and he cried, and said, Yet forty days, and Nineveh shall be overthrown. {5} So the people of Nineveh believed God, and proclaimed a fast, and put on sackcloth, from the greatest of them even to the least of them. {6} For word came unto the king of Nineveh, and he arose from his throne, and he laid his robe from him, and covered [him] with sackcloth, and sat in ashes. {7} And he caused [it] to be proclaimed and published through Nineveh by the decree of the king and his nobles, saying, Let neither man nor beast, herd nor flock, taste any thing: let them not feed, nor drink water:{8} But let man and beast be covered with sackcloth, and cry mightily [chozqah:H2394] unto God: yea, let them turn every one from his evil way, and from the violence that [is] in their hands. {9} Who can tell [if] God will turn and repent, and turn away from his fierce anger, that we perish not? {10} And God saw their works, that they turned from their evil way; and God repented of the evil, that he had said that he would do unto them; and he did [it] not.”


A Picture Of The World


In this account of Jonah we see the power of the Gospel to spiritually transform a heathen nation in a very short period of time; undoubtedly, this was one of the greatest examples of a genuine “spiritual awakening” that God, as always, singlehandedly orchestrated; what happened in Nineveh also mirrors the unparalleled worldwide Gospel penetration that occurred from Sept 7, 1994 - May 21, 2011, known as the “Latter Rain.”  But the other point that I want to emphasize - besides the fervency with which the Ninevites beseeched God in this singular, and unrepeated event in their history -  is the reality that they represent the “world,” or the “nations,” that by nature, are under the wrath of God. This is why we read three times (denoting the “purpose of God”) that Sisera was living “...in Harosheth [Charosheth:H2800]  of the Gentiles [gowy:H1471]…,” as I mentioned in our last study (in verses 2, 13, and 16).

And when one considers what the “world” or “nations” typify, 1 John 2:16 comes to mind:


“For all that [is] in the world, the lust of the flesh, and the lust of the eyes, and the pride of life, is not of the Father, but is of the world. {17} And the world passeth away, and the lust thereof: but he that doeth the will of God abideth for ever.”

Moreover, up until May 21, 2011 (in which God is now ruling this world “with a rod of iron,” or in judgment) God had allowed the devil to exercise tremendous authority, by default, since Adam and Eve’s sin in the Garden of Eden, which is why he could arrogantly boast to Christ, when He was being tempted in the desert for “forty (a number that points to “testing”) days and forty nights” (Mat 4:2) in verse 5-6, of Luke 4:1-8,


“And Jesus being full of the Holy Ghost returned from Jordan, and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, {2} Being forty days tempted of the devil. And in those days he did eat nothing: and when they were ended, he afterward hungered. {3} And the devil said unto him, If thou be the Son of God, command this stone that it be made bread.{4} And Jesus answered him, saying, It is written, That man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word of God. {5} And the devil, taking him up into an high mountain [representing the kingdom of Satan], shewed unto him all the kingdoms of the world in a moment of time. {6} And the devil said unto him, All this power will I give thee, and the glory of them: for that is delivered unto me; and to whomsoever I will I give it. {7} If thou therefore wilt worship me, all shall be thine. {8} And Jesus answered and said unto him, Get thee behind me, Satan: for it is written, Thou shalt worship the Lord thy God, and him only shalt thou serve.” 


So we see that spiritually God is making a connection between Satan and his kingdom (the “world” or “nations”), and the fact that three times Sisera is associated with the “nations;” thus Sisera (like Pharaoh or Nebuchadnezzar), represents Satan. Incidentally, as we continue our examination of Judges 4 and 5, the evidence for this conclusion will become even more apparent.


And Deborah A Prophetess, The Wife Of Lapidoth


In Jud 4:4-5, we are introduced to another one of the main characters in this historical parable, “And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth…” We won’t encounter Sisera again until verse 12, although he is mentioned in verses 7 and 9 (regarding his fate), as Deborah explains to Barak (the third protagonist in this eye-opening account) her battle plan, and the manner of Sisera’s defeat. Deborah’s name (Debowrah:H1683) is identically spelled as “bee” (debowrah:H1682), and their root word is “dabar” (H1696), which is predominantly translated as “speak,” and is identical in spelling to the term, “word” (dabar:H1697), and commonly rendered as such. 


In verse 12 of Psa 118:5-12 we witness one interesting usage of this term, “bees,” which results in victory for the Kingdom of God, over “the nations” (or “world”), which constitute the kingdom of Satan: “I called upon the LORD in distress: the LORD answered me, [and set me] in a large place. {6} The LORD [is] on my side; I will not fear: what can man do unto me? {7} The LORD taketh my part with them that help me: therefore shall I see [my desire] upon them that hate me. {8} [It is] better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in man. {9} [It is] better to trust in the LORD than to put confidence in princes. {10} All nations [gowy:H1471] compassed me about [cabab:H5437]: but in the name of the LORD will I destroy [muwl:H4135] them. {11} They compassed me about [cabab:H5437]; yea, they compassed me about [cabab:H5437]: but in the name of the LORD I will destroy [muwl:H4135] them. {12} They compassed me about like bees [debowrah:H1682]; they are quenched as the fire of thorns: for in the name of the LORD I will destroy [muwl:H4135] them.”


Please note how the word “all nations” [gowy:H1471] is utilized in verse 10, along with the terms “compassed me about,” (cabab:H5437) employed three times, as well as the expression, “I will destroy,” (muwl:H4135), also found three times, again, underscoring “God’s purpose.” By the way, the word, “I will destroy” is, in the majority of cases, rendered as “circumcise.” 


 Likewise in verse 44 of Deu 1:41-46, it is rendered “as bees,” depicting the Amorites that God used to chastise Israel for their disobedience: “Then ye answered and said unto me, We have sinned against the LORD, we will go up and fight, according to all that the LORD our God commanded us. And when ye had girded on every man his weapons of war, ye were ready to go up into the hill. {42} And the LORD said unto me, Say unto them, Go not up, neither fight; for I [am] not among you; lest ye be smitten before your enemies. {43} So I spake unto you; and ye would not hear, but rebelled against the commandment of the LORD, and went presumptuously up into the hill. {44} And the Amorites, which dwelt in that mountain, came out against you, and chased you, as bees [debowrah:H1682] do, and destroyed you in Seir, [even] unto Hormah. {45} And ye returned and wept before the LORD; but the LORD would not hearken to your voice, nor give ear unto you. {46} So ye abode in Kadesh many days, according unto the days that ye abode [there].”


And Deborah A Prophetess


Going back to Deborah (debowrah:H1683), we find that her name only appears in Judges 4 and 5, except for the account of Rebekah’s nurse (also called Deborah) in Gen 35:8, which I won’t develop, as that is another amazing historical parable, in its own right. We also learn that Deborah was also “a prophetess” (nebiy’ah:H5031), and judge at the same time. As a prophetess, she joins the ranks of Miriam (Moses’ sister), Huldah, and Isaiah’s wife, as the subsequent passages reveal:  


Exo 15:20 states, “And Miriam the prophetess, [nebiy’ah:H5031] the sister of Aaron, took a timbrel in her hand; and all the women went out after her with timbrels and with dances.”


2 Kin 22:14 declares, “So Hilkiah the priest, and Ahikam, and Achbor, and Shaphan, and Asahiah, went unto Huldah the prophetess, [nebiy’ah:H5031] the wife of Shallum the son of Tikvah, the son of Harhas, keeper of the wardrobe; (now she dwelt in Jerusalem in the college;) and they communed with her.”


Isa 8:3 adds, “And I went unto the prophetess; [nebiy’ah:H5031] and she conceived, and bare a son. Then said the LORD to me, Call his name Mahershalalhashbaz.”


We can understand this to indicate the spiritual principle that a “prophet” or “prophetess” is simply “one who declares the Word of God,” and not to insinuate in any way, that a woman is called to teach the Bible, as many during our day have rebelliously done, as Neh 6:14 illustrates, with regard to the false “prophetess,” Noadiah:


“My God, think thou upon Tobiah and Sanballat according to these their works, and on the prophetess [nebiy’ah:H5031] Noadiah, and the rest of the prophets, that would have put me in fear.”


The reason for this not because women are inferior to men intellectually or spiritually (many times they might be superior, in fact) - but because God has not given them that spiritual role; in similar fashion, God has not given the role of child-bearing to a man. 


In our next study, Lord willing, we will continue our investigation of judge Deborah, as God allows us to unravel the spiritual panorama that He has hidden in Judges 4 (and 5). 



Judges 4 - Part 4

Air Date: May 1, 2017



“And the children of Israel again did evil in the sight of the LORD, when Ehud was dead. {2} And the LORD sold them into the hand of Jabin king of Canaan, that reigned in Hazor; the captain of whose host [was] Sisera, which dwelt in Harosheth of the Gentiles. {3} And the children of Israel cried unto the LORD: for he had nine hundred chariots of iron; and twenty years he mightily oppressed the children of Israel. {4} And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment.”


And Deborah A Prophetess, The Wife Of Lapidoth


We are focusing our attention on Deborah, the only female judge, who along with Barak, ruled for 40 years beween 1287-1247 BC. As I stated peviously, Deborah’s name (Debowrah:H1683) is identical to “bee”(debowrah:H1682), and their root words (dabar:H1696/1697) are identically spelled, and signify “speaking” or “word,” We want to keep that connection in mind as we go through this chapter as well as chapter 5. Spiritually speaking, “bees” can be indicative of judgment, and are also associated with “honey” (symbolizing the Word of God), as we will encounter, if God allows us to get to the historical parable of Samson and the lion he killed in Jud 14:8,


“And after a time he returned to take her, and he turned aside to see the carcase of the lion: and, behold, [there was] a swarm of bees [debowrah:H1682] and honey in the carcase of the lion.”


Deborah (along with Barak) were commissioned by God to deliver Israel from their Canaanite oppressors. The Scriptures also inform us that Deborah was married to a man by the name of Lapidoth (Lappiydowth:H3941); he is only mentioned once in verse 4, and his name is identically spelled to “lappiyd” (H3940), denoting (the plural form) of a “lamp” or “torch.”  

This term appears 14 times in these ways: lamp (7x),firebrand(2x), torch(2x), brand(1x), lightning(1x), and once asburning.” It is a term that can refer to God Himself, to judgment, to salvation, and to the end of salvation,


Recounting God’s appearance on top of Mt. Sinai, verse 18 of Exo 20:18-20 declares, “And all the people saw the thunderings, and the lightnings, [lappiydH3940] and the noise of the trumpet, and the mountain smoking: and when the people saw [it], they removed, and stood afar off. {19} And they said unto Moses, Speak thou with us, and we will hear: but let not God speak with us, lest we die. {20} And Moses said unto the people, Fear not: for God is come to prove you, and that his fear may be before your faces, that ye sin not.”


Likewise, in verse 6 of Dan 10:5-7 we see this vision of the Lord Jesus Christ, “Then I lifted up mine eyes, and looked, and behold a certain man clothed in linen, whose loins [were] girded with fine gold of Uphaz: {6} His body also [was] like the beryl, and his face as the appearance of lightning, and his eyes as lamps [lappiyd:H3940] of fire, and his arms and his feet like in colour to polished brass, and the voice of his words like the voice of a multitude. {7} And I Daniel alone saw the vision: for the men that were with me saw not the vision; but a great quaking fell upon them, so that they fled to hide themselves.”


In verse 17 of Gen 15:4-18, this term is translated as “lamp” in this very intriguing passage regarding the promise (of eternal life) given to Abraham (and all the elect) concerning the Lord Jesus Christ as the “Seed” with a capital “S,” as Gal 3:16 maintains:


“Now to Abraham and his seed were the promises made. He saith not, And to seeds, as of many; but as of one, And to thy seed, which is Christ.”


Gen 15:4-18 reveals, “And, behold, the word of the LORD [came] unto him, saying, This shall not be thine heir; but he that shall come forth out of thine own bowels shall be thine heir. {5} And he brought him forth abroad, and said, Look now toward heaven, and tell the stars, if thou be able to number them: and he said unto him, So shall thy seed be. {6} And he believed in the LORD; and he counted it to him for righteousness. {7} And he said unto him, I [am] the LORD that brought thee out of Ur of the Chaldees, to give thee this land to inherit it. {8} And he said, Lord GOD, whereby shall I know that I shall inherit it? {9} And he said unto him, Take me an heifer of three years old, and a she goat of three years old, and a ram of three years old, and a turtledove, and a young pigeon. {10} And he took unto him all these, and divided them in the midst, and laid each piece one against another: but the birds divided he not. {11} And when the fowls came down upon the carcases, Abram drove them away. {12} And when the sun was going down, a deep sleep fell upon Abram; and, lo, an horror of great darkness fell upon him. {13} And he said unto Abram, Know of a surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land [that is] not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall afflict them four hundred years; {14} And also that nation, whom they shall serve, will I judge: and afterward shall they come out with great substance. {15} And thou shalt go to thy fathers in peace; thou shalt be buried in a good old age. {16} But in the fourth generation they shall come hither again: for the iniquity of the Amorites [is] not yet full. {17} And it came to pass, that, when the sun went down, and it was dark, behold a smoking furnace, and a burning lamp [lappiyd:H3940] that passed between those pieces. {18} In the same day the LORD made a covenant with Abram, saying, Unto thy seed have I given this land, from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates:”


And She Dwelt [yashab:H3427] Under The Palm Tree [tomer:H8560] Of Deborah [Debowrah:H1683]...In Mount [har:H2022] Ephraim [Ephrayim:H669]


The next verse that we encounter is verse 5, which states: 


And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment.”


Let’s consider where she “dwelt” (yashab:H3427) or lived. This is the same word used to describe where Sisera lived in Jud 4:2 “...which dwelt [yashab:H3427] in Harosheth of the Gentiles” that we discussed in Part 2. This same term appeared 14 times in Judges, chapter 1, a few times in Judges 2 and 3, and we will see it again in Judges 5, four more times. 


Deborah (remember she represents “bees” or the “Word” of God) is said to live “...under the palm tree of Deborah...in mount Ephraim.” The term, “under the palm tree” is only utilized in one other reference, in verse 5 of Jer 10:1-5, in which it is translated “as the palm tree,” and in the context, is referring to the religious customs of the non-elect,


“ Hear ye the word which the LORD speaketh unto you, O house of Israel: {2} Thus saith the LORD, Learn not the way of the heathen, and be not dismayed at the signs of heaven; for the heathen are dismayed at them. {3} For the customs of the people [are] vain: for [one] cutteth a tree out of the forest, the work of the hands of the workman, with the axe. {4} They deck it with silver and with gold; they fasten it with nails and with hammers, that it move not. {5} They [are] upright as the palm tree [tomer:H8560], but speak not: they must needs be borne, because they cannot go. Be not afraid of them; for they cannot do evil, neither also [is it] in them to do good.”


The root word for this term, “under the palm tree” (tomer:H8560) is “tamar” (H8558), and occurs 12 other times, and always as “palm tree,” as these next passages illustrate:


This word appeared previously in our studies of Judges 1 and 3, regarding the city “of palm trees” (or Jericho):


Jud 1:16 and 3:13 state:  “And the children of the Kenite, Moses' father in law, went up out of the city of palm trees [tamar:H8558] with the children of Judah into the wilderness of Judah, which [lieth] in the south of Arad; and they went and dwelt among the people… {3:13} And he gathered unto him the children of Ammon and Amalek, and went and smote Israel, and possessed the city of palm trees. [tamar:H8558]


In Psa 92:12, we find what is called a “definition verse,” which is most helpful, as God graciously shows us the correct spiritual interpretation of a word - in this case identifying the child of God with a palm tree or cedar: The righteous shall flourish like the palm tree: [tamar:H8558] he shall grow like a cedar [’erez:H730] in Lebanon.”


In verse 15 of Neh 8:13-18 we also read about “palm” branches in conjunction with the Feast of Tabernacles: “And on the second day were gathered together the chief of the fathers of all the people, the priests, and the Levites, unto Ezra the scribe, even to understand the words of the law. {14} And they found written in the law which the LORD had commanded by Moses, that the children of Israel should dwell in booths in the feast of the seventh month: {15} And that they should publish and proclaim in all their cities, and in Jerusalem, saying, Go forth unto the mount, and fetch olive branches, and pine branches, and myrtle branches, and palm [tamar:H8558] branches, and branches of thick trees, to make booths, as [it is] written. {16} So the people went forth, and brought [them], and made themselves booths, every one upon the roof of his house, and in their courts, and in the courts of the house of God, and in the street of the water gate, and in the street of the gate of Ephraim. {17} And all the congregation of them that were come again out of the captivity made booths, and sat under the booths: for since the days of Jeshua the son of Nun unto that day had not the children of Israel done so. And there was very great gladness. {18} Also day by day, from the first day unto the last day, he read in the book of the law of God. And they kept the feast seven days; and on the eighth day [was] a solemn assembly, according unto the manner.”


Neh 8:14 is referring to Lev 23:33-36, and 39-43, in a chapter which stipulates the three main feasts that the children of Isarel were to oberve throughout the course of the year: “And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {34} Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, The fifteenth day of this seventh month [shall be] the feast of tabernacles [for] seven days unto the LORD.{35} On the first day [shall be] an holy convocation: ye shall do no servile work [therein]. {36} Seven days ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: on the eighth day shall be an holy convocation unto you; and ye shall offer an offering made by fire unto the LORD: it [is] a solemn assembly; [and] ye shall do no servile work [therein]. ... {39} Also in the fifteenth day of the seventh month, when ye have gathered in the fruit of the land, ye shall keep a feast unto the LORD seven days: on the first day [shall be] a sabbath, and on the eighth day [shall be] a sabbath. {40} And ye shall take you on the first day the boughs of goodly trees, branches of palm [tamar:H8558] trees, and the boughs of thick trees, and willows of the brook; and ye shall rejoice before the LORD your God seven days. {41} And ye shall keep it a feast unto the LORD seven days in the year. [It shall be] a statute for ever in your generations: ye shall celebrate it in the seventh month. {42} Ye shall dwell in booths seven days; all that are Israelites born shall dwell in booths: {43} That your generations may know that I made the children of Israel to dwell in booths, when I brought them out of the land of Egypt: I [am] the LORD your God.”


In Mount [har:H2022] Ephraim [’Ephrayim:H669]


Deborah’s location under the “palm tree” is said to have been situated “...in mount [har:H2022] Ephraim” [’Ephrayim:H669], which we saw earlier in Judges 3, in connection with Ehud’s victory over the Moabites in Jud 3:27; Ephraim [from’Ephraath/’Ephratah (or Bethlehem):H672]  signifies “double fruitfulness”:


“And it came to pass, when he was come, that he blew a trumpet in the mountain [har:H2022] of Ephraim [Ephrayim:H669], and the children of Israel went down with him from the mount, and he before them.” 


Lord willing, in our next study we will look at the terms, Ramah and Bethel, since mount Ephraim was situated in between these two places, and we will continue looking at judge Deborah. 

 






Judges 4 - Part 5

Air Date: May 3, 2017



We read in Judges 4:4-7, “And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment. {6} And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go and draw toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


Ramah [Ramah:H7414] And Bethel [Beyth’El:H1008]


At the close of our last study, I said that we would take a closer look at Ramah and Bethel, as we learned from verse 5 that judge Deborah “dwelt” or lived in between these two towns.


“Ramah” (H7414) in the Bible incudes both positive as well as negative connotations. For instance, David was anointed king in Ramah (1 Sam 16:1 and 13), and Samuel (1 Sam 7:17) and his parents (1 Sam 1:19) hailed from there. On the other hand we read of God’s judgments in connection with Ramah in passages like Jer 15 and Hos 5. 


There is also another term that is identically spelled as “Ramah” - “ramah”(H7413), and curiously this word is only found in four verses, and they all appear in the same chapter - in verses 24, 25, 31, and 39 of Eze 16. However, I’ll read from 1-39, in this unique account of the history of the nation of Israel, whom God was married. This chapter uniquely outlines His loving care and abundant spiritual provision that He showered upon for His corporate Bride; at the same time we also read about His judgment upon her, for her sins - her spiritual adultery - or “high places,” which is how God utilizes this word, “ramah,” which is repeated in these four verses. Notice in particular, the powerful denunciation right at the start in verses 2-3 with regard to Jerusalem - typifying the churches and denominations of our day:


“Again the word of the LORD came unto me, saying, {2} Son of man, cause Jerusalem to know her abominations, {3} And say, Thus saith the Lord GOD unto Jerusalem; Thy birth and thy nativity [is] of the land of Canaan; thy father [was] an Amorite, and thy mother an Hittite. {4} And [as for] thy nativity, in the day thou wast born thy navel was not cut, neither wast thou washed in water to supple [thee]; thou wast not salted at all, nor swaddled at all. {5} None eye pitied thee, to do any of these unto thee, to have compassion upon thee; but thou wast cast out in the open field, to the lothing of thy person, in the day that thou wast born. {6} And when I passed by thee, and saw thee polluted in thine own blood, I said unto thee [when thou wast] in thy blood, Live; yea, I said unto thee [when thou wast] in thy blood, Live. {7} I have caused thee to multiply as the bud of the field, and thou hast increased and waxen great, and thou art come to excellent ornaments: [thy] breasts are fashioned, and thine hair is grown, whereas thou [wast] naked and bare. {8} Now when I passed by thee, and looked upon thee, behold, thy time [was] the time of love; and I spread my skirt over thee, and covered thy nakedness: yea, I sware unto thee, and entered into a covenant with thee, saith the Lord GOD, and thou becamest mine. {9} Then washed I thee with water; yea, I throughly washed away thy blood from thee, and I anointed thee with oil. {10} I clothed thee also with broidered work, and shod thee with badgers' skin, and I girded thee about with fine linen, and I covered thee with silk. {11} I decked thee also with ornaments, and I put bracelets upon thy hands, and a chain on thy neck. {12} And I put a jewel on thy forehead, and earrings in thine ears, and a beautiful crown upon thine head. {13} Thus wast thou decked with gold and silver; and thy raiment [was of] fine linen, and silk, and broidered work; thou didst eat fine flour, and honey, and oil: and thou wast exceeding beautiful, and thou didst prosper into a kingdom. {14} And thy renown went forth among the heathen for thy beauty: for it [was] perfect through my comeliness, which I had put upon thee, saith the Lord GOD. {15} But thou didst trust in thine own beauty, and playedst the harlot because of thy renown, and pouredst out thy fornications on every one that passed by; his it was. {16} And of thy garments thou didst take, and deckedst thy high places with divers colours, and playedst the harlot thereupon: [the like things] shall not come, neither shall it be [so]. {17} Thou hast also taken thy fair jewels of my gold and of my silver, which I had given thee, and madest to thyself images of men, and didst commit whoredom with them, {18} And tookest thy broidered garments, and coveredst them: and thou hast set mine oil and mine incense before them. {19} My meat also which I gave thee, fine flour, and oil, and honey, [wherewith] I fed thee, thou hast even set it before them for a sweet savour: and [thus] it was, saith the Lord GOD. {20} Moreover thou hast taken thy sons and thy daughters, whom thou hast borne unto me, and these hast thou sacrificed unto them to be devoured. [Is this] of thy whoredoms a small matter, {21} That thou hast slain my children, and delivered them to cause them to pass through [the fire] for them? {22} And in all thine abominations and thy whoredoms thou hast not remembered the days of thy youth, when thou wast naked and bare, [and] wast polluted in thy blood. {23} And it came to pass after all thy wickedness, (woe, woe unto thee! saith the Lord GOD;) {24} [That] thou hast also built unto thee an eminent place, and hast made thee an high place [ramah:H7413] in every street. {25} Thou hast built thy high place  [ramah:H7413] at every head of the way, and hast made thy beauty to be abhorred, and hast opened thy feet to every one that passed by, and multiplied thy whoredoms. {26} Thou hast also committed fornication with the Egyptians thy neighbours, great of flesh; and hast increased thy whoredoms, to provoke me to anger. {27} Behold, therefore I have stretched out my hand over thee, and have diminished thine ordinary [food], and delivered thee unto the will of them that hate thee, the daughters of the Philistines, which are ashamed of thy lewd way. {28} Thou hast played the whore also with the Assyrians, because thou wast unsatiable; yea, thou hast played the harlot with them, and yet couldest not be satisfied. {29} Thou hast moreover multiplied thy fornication in the land of Canaan unto Chaldea; and yet thou wast not satisfied herewith. {30} How weak is thine heart, saith the Lord GOD, seeing thou doest all these [things], the work of an imperious whorish woman; {31} In that thou buildest thine eminent place in the head of every way, and makest thine high place  [ramah:H7413] in every street; and hast not been as an harlot, in that thou scornest hire; {32} [But as] a wife that committeth adultery, [which] taketh strangers instead of her husband! {33} They give gifts to all whores: but thou givest thy gifts to all thy lovers, and hirest them, that they may come unto thee on every side for thy whoredom. {34} And the contrary is in thee from [other] women in thy whoredoms, whereas none followeth thee to commit whoredoms: and in that thou givest a reward, and no reward is given unto thee, therefore thou art contrary. {35} Wherefore, O harlot, hear the word of the LORD: {36} Thus saith the Lord GOD; Because thy filthiness was poured out, and thy nakedness discovered through thy whoredoms with thy lovers, and with all the idols of thy abominations, and by the blood of thy children, which thou didst give unto them; {37} Behold, therefore I will gather all thy lovers, with whom thou hast taken pleasure, and all [them] that thou hast loved, with all [them] that thou hast hated; I will even gather them round about against thee, and will discover thy nakedness unto them, that they may see all thy nakedness. {38} And I will judge thee, as women that break wedlock and shed blood are judged; and I will give thee blood in fury and jealousy. {39} And I will also give thee into their hand, and they shall throw down thine eminent place, and shall break down thy high places [ramah:H7413]: they shall strip thee also of thy clothes, and shall take thy fair jewels, and leave thee naked and bare.”


This terrible picture I just read is the reason God divorced Himself from national Israel, by a temporary law that He had instituted in Deu 24:1, which if He had not done, He would have been obligated to stone the entire nation to death, which is the punishment for adultery - spiritual adultery - in this case. The reason why He could not kill the entire nation was because the Messiah had to come through the nation of Israel, along with all of the elect out of the nation.

The Origins of Bethel


Let’s now consider, Bethel. In Gen 28:10-22 we read about the origins of Bethel (or “the house of God”): 


“And Jacob went out from Beersheba, and went toward Haran. {11} And he lighted upon a certain place, and tarried there all night, because the sun was set; and he took of the stones of that place, and put them for his pillows, and lay down in that place to sleep. {12} And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth, and the top of it reached to heaven: and behold the angels of God ascending and descending on it. {13} And, behold, the LORD stood above it, and said, I am the LORD God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac: the land whereon thou liest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed; {14} And thy seed shall be as the dust of the earth, and thou shalt spread abroad to the west, and to the east, and to the north, and to the south: and in thee and in thy seed shall all the families of the earth be blessed. {15} And, behold, I am with thee, and will keep thee in all places whither thou goest, and will bring thee again into this land; for I will not leave thee, until I have done that which I have spoken to thee of. {16} And Jacob awaked out of his sleep, and he said, Surely the LORD is in this place; and I knew it not. {17} And he was afraid, and said, How dreadful is this place! this is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven. {18} And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it. {19} And he called the name of that place Bethel: but the name of that city was called Luz at the first. {20} And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, {21} So that I come again to my father’s house in peace; then shall the LORD be my God: {22} And this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God’s house: and of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.” 


Bethel Comes under God’s Judgment


As with Ramah, we note both positive as well as negative connotations with Bethel, or “the house of God,” and this represents even to a greater degree her corporate marriage to God, Initially, Bethel represented the holy place where God appeared and spoke to Jacob and where God made certain promises to him (even as He had done with Abraham and Isaac) regarding the “land” as well as “his seed.” It was there that Jacob was also commanded to build an altar to God.  


Yet, ironically, Jer 2:21 poses this caustic question: “Yet I had planted thee a noble vine, wholly a right seed: how then art thou turned into the degenerate plant of a strange vine unto me?” 


Amos 3:13-14 states, “Hear ye, and testify in the house of Jacob, saith the Lord GOD, the God of hosts, That in the day that I shall visit the transgressions of Israel upon him I will also visit the altars of Bethel: and the horns of the altar shall be cut off, and fall to the ground.”


In 1 Kin 12:25-31 we learn of wicked king Jeroboam’s plot to secure his position as king: 


“Then Jeroboam built Shechem in mount Ephraim, and dwelt therein; and went out from thence, and built Penuel. {26} And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David: {27} If this people go up to do sacrifice in the house of the LORD at Jerusalem, then shall the heart of this people turn again unto their lord, even unto Rehoboam king of Judah, and they shall kill me, and go again to Rehoboam king of Judah. {28} Whereupon the king took counsel, and made two calves of gold, and said unto them, It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem: behold thy gods, O Israel, which brought thee up out of the land of Egypt. {29} And he set the one in Bethel, and the other put he in Dan. {30} And this thing became a sin: for the people went to worship before the one, even unto Dan. {31} And he made an house of high places, and made priests of the lowest of the people, which were not of the sons of Levi.”


What is being described here is none other than the death of the institutional churches and denominations of our day, as predicted throughout the Bible and symbolized by Bethel, “the house of God,” and described by 1 Pet 4:17-18 in the New Testament, and by its counterpart in the Old Testament, in Jer 25:29,


1 Pet 4:17-18 announces, “For the time [is come] that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if [it] first [begin] at us, what shall the end [be] of them that obey not the gospel of God? {18} And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?”


And Jer 25:29 likewise proclaims: “For, lo, I begin to bring evil on the city which is called by my name, and should ye be utterly unpunished? Ye shall not be unpunished: for I will call for a sword upon all the inhabitants of the earth, saith the LORD of hosts.”


Lord willing, in our next study, we will continue our examination of Jud 4.











Judges 4 - Part 6

Air Date: May 5, 2017



We read in Judges 4:4-7, “And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment. {6} And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go and draw toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


And The Children Of Israel Came Up To Her For Judgment [mishpat:H4941]


We are down to the last phrase in verse 5, “...and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment,” referring to judge Deborah. This term is found over 400 times, and predominantly as “judgment,” “manner,” “right,” “cause,” and “ordinance,” etc. We will also encounter this word again in the subsequent chapters of the book of Judges:


In Jud 13:12, it appears as “how shall we order” as part of Manoah’s (Samson’s father) question which he poses to the “Angel”: “And Manoah said, Now let thy words come to pass. How shall we order [mishpat:H4941] the child, and [how] shall we do unto him?”


Jud 18:7, on the other hand, renders this word as, “after the manner”:  “Then the five men departed, and came to Laish, and saw the people that [were] therein, how they dwelt careless, after the manner [mishpat:H4941] of the Zidonians, quiet and secure; and [there was] no magistrate in the land, that might put [them] to shame in [any] thing; and they [were] far from the Zidonians, and had no business with [any] man.”


A chapter that includes this word, as “ordinance” or “judgment” numerous times, is in verses 8-9,11, and 14-15 of Isa 59; I’ll also include verse 2 of Isa 58:1-2; both chapters deal with God’s wrath upon national Israel, which represents the end time institutional churches of our day, and yet God highlights that He will save His elect - those for whom, were named in the Lamb’s “Book of Life,” and for whom died, as the “firstbegotten from the dead” as well as the “Testator” of the will “...from the foundation of the world”:


Isa 58:1-2, “Cry aloud, spare not, lift up thy voice like a trumpet, and shew my people their transgression, and the house of Jacob their sins. {2} Yet they seek me daily, and delight to know my ways, as a nation that did righteousness, and forsook not the ordinance [mishpat:H4941] of their God: they ask of me the ordinances of justice; they take delight in approaching to God…{59:8} The way of peace they know not; and [there is] no judgment [mishpat:H4941] in their goings: they have made them crooked paths: whosoever goeth therein shall not know peace. {9} Therefore is judgment [mishpat:H4941]  far from us, neither doth justice overtake us: we wait for light, but behold obscurity; for brightness, [but] we walk in darkness. ... {11} We roar all like bears, and mourn sore like doves: we look for judgment [mishpat:H4941], but [there is] none; for salvation, [but] it is far off from us. ... {14} And judgment [mishpat:H4941] is turned away backward, and justice standeth afar off: for truth is fallen in the street, and equity cannot enter. {15} Yea, truth faileth; and he [that] departeth from evil maketh himself a prey: and the LORD saw [it], and it displeased him that [there was] no judgment.” [mishpat:H4941] 


 And She Sent [shalach:H7971] And Called [qara’:H7121] Barak [Baraq:H1301] The Son [ben:H1121] Of Abinoam [’Abiyno`am:H42] Out Of Kedeshnaphtali [Qedesh:H6943]


In verse 6, we also learn what Deborah does next in the historical setting: “And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali…” We have seen the term, “and she sent,” along with “and called” previously in this series For instance, I’ll read Jud 3:15, 18, and 21, in which this word “and she sent” is rendered as: “sent,” “he sent away,” and “put forth,” respectively:


“But when the children of Israel cried unto the LORD, the LORD raised them up a deliverer, Ehud the son of Gera, a Benjamite, a man lefthanded: and by him the children of Israel sent [shalach:H7971] a present unto Eglon the king of Moab. ... {18} And when he had made an end to offer the present, he sent away [shalach:H7971]  the people that bare the present. ... {21} And Ehud put forth [shalach:H7971] his left hand, and took the dagger from his right thigh, and thrust it into his belly:


We also encountered the term “and called” (qara’:H7121) in verse 5 of Jud 2:1-5,


“And an angel of the LORD came up from Gilgal to Bochim, and said, I made you to go up out of Egypt, and have brought you unto the land which I sware unto your fathers; and I said, I will never break my covenant with you. {2} And ye shall make no league with the inhabitants of this land; ye shall throw down their altars: but ye have not obeyed my voice: why have ye done this? {3} Wherefore I also said, I will not drive them out from before you; but they shall be [as thorns] in your sides, and their gods shall be a snare unto you. {4} And it came to pass, when the angel of the LORD spake these words unto all the children of Israel, that the people lifted up their voice, and wept. {5} And they called [qara’:H7121] the name of that place Bochim [i.e., “weeping”]: and they sacrificed there unto the LORD.”


 

Barak [Baraq:H1301] The Son [ben:H1121] Of Abinoam [’Abiyno`am:H42] 


Barak is the third main character in this intriguing historical parable, and he appears in 13 verses, and only in Judges 4 and 5. His name is identically spelled to “lightning” (baraq:H1300),  which is what his name signifies, and is translated 21 times in the following ways: lightning (14x), glittering (4x),bright (1x), glitter(1x), and once as glittering sword.”  In turn, their solitary root word (also spelled identically), surfaces only in verse 6 of Psa 144:1-6, as “cast forth” (baraq:H1299) along with “lightning”  (baraq:H1300):  


“[A Psalm] of David.] Blessed [be] the LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, [and] my fingers to fight: {2} My goodness, and my fortress; my high tower, and my deliverer; my shield, and [he] in whom I trust; who subdueth my people under me.{3} LORD, what [is] man, that thou takest knowledge of him! [or] the son of man, that thou makest account of him! {4} Man is like to vanity: his days [are] as a shadow that passeth away. {5} Bow thy heavens, O LORD, and come down: touch the mountains, and they shall smoke.{6} Cast forth [baraq:1299] lightning [baraq:H1300], and scatter them: shoot out thine arrows, and destroy them.”


Let’s consider some of the passages that contain this fearful word, “lightning”  (baraq:H1300):


In Deu 32 God gave Moses, under divine inspiration, this song (recorded in verses 1-43), in which, in verse 41 this term is rendered “my glittering,” modifying the next word, “sword;” I’ll read verses 40-44,


“See now that I, [even] I, [am] he, and [there is] no god with me: I kill, and I make alive; I wound, and I heal: neither [is there any] that can deliver out of my hand. {40} For I lift up my hand to heaven, and say, I live for ever. {41} If I whet my glittering [baraq:H1300] sword, and mine hand take hold on judgment; I will render vengeance to mine enemies, and will reward them that hate me. {42} I will make mine arrows drunk with blood, and my sword shall devour flesh; [and that] with the blood of the slain and of the captives, from the beginning of revenges upon the enemy. {43} Rejoice, O ye nations, [with] his people: for he will avenge the blood of his servants, and will render vengeance to his adversaries, and will be merciful unto his land, [and] to his people. {44} And Moses came and spake all the words of this song in the ears of the people, he, and Hoshea the son of Nun.”


In verse 25 of Job 20:24-29, this term is similarly translated asthis one Hebrew word, “yea, the glittering sword”: “He shall flee from the iron weapon, [and] the bow of steel shall strike him through. {25} It is drawn, and cometh out of the body; yea, the glittering sword [baraq:H1300] cometh out of his gall: terrors [are] upon him. {26} All darkness [shall be] hid in his secret places: a fire not blown shall consume him; it shall go ill with him that is left in his tabernacle. {27} The heaven shall reveal his iniquity; and the earth shall rise up against him. {28} The increase of his house shall depart, [and his goods] shall flow away in the day of his wrath. {29} This [is] the portion of a wicked man from God, and the heritage appointed unto him by God.”


Also, in verse 18 of Psa 77:14-20, this word is rendered “the lightnings”: “Thou [art] the God that doest wonders: thou hast declared thy strength among the people. {15} Thou hast with [thine] arm redeemed thy people, the sons of Jacob and Joseph. Selah. {16} The waters saw thee, O God, the waters saw thee; they were afraid: the depths also were troubled. {17} The clouds poured out water: the skies sent out a sound: thine arrows also went abroad. {18] The voice of thy thunder [was] in the heaven: the lightnings [baraq:H1300] lightened the world: the earth trembled and shook. {19} Thy way [is] in the sea, and thy path in the great waters, and thy footsteps are not known. {20} Thou leddest thy people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aaron.”


In Dan 10:4-12, the “certain man’s” face (exemplifying the Lord Jesus Christ) is depicted by this word, “of lightning”: “And in the four and twentieth day of the first month, as I was by the side of the great river, which [is] Hiddekel; {5} Then I lifted up mine eyes, and looked, and behold a certain man clothed in linen, whose loins [were] girded with fine gold of Uphaz: {6} His body also [was] like the beryl, and his face as the appearance of lightning  [baraq:H1300], and his eyes as lamps of fire, and his arms and his feet like in colour to polished brass, and the voice of his words like the voice of a multitude. {7} And I Daniel alone saw the vision: for the men that were with me saw not the vision; but a great quaking fell upon them, so that they fled to hide themselves. {8} Therefore I was left alone, and saw this great vision, and there remained no strength in me: for my comeliness was turned in me into corruption, and I retained no strength. {9} Yet heard I the voice of his words: and when I heard the voice of his words, then was I in a deep sleep on my face, and my face toward the ground. {10} And, behold, an hand touched me, which set me upon my knees and [upon] the palms of my hands. {11} And he said unto me, O Daniel, a man greatly beloved, understand the words that I speak unto thee, and stand upright: for unto thee am I now sent. And when he had spoken this word unto me, I stood trembling. {12} Then said he unto me, Fear not, Daniel: for from the first day that thou didst set thine heart to understand, and to chasten thyself before thy God, thy words were heard, and I am come for thy words.”


The foregoing passage in Daniel is reminiscent of John’s vision in Rev 1:12-17, “And I turned to see the voice that spake with me. And being turned, I saw seven golden candlesticks; {13} And in the midst of the seven candlesticks [one] like unto the Son of man, clothed with a garment down to the foot, and girt about the paps with a golden girdle. {14}  His head and [his] hairs [were] white like wool, as white as snow; and his eyes [were] as a flame of fire; {15} And his feet like unto fine brass, as if they burned in a furnace; and his voice as the sound of many waters. {16} And he had in his right hand seven stars: and out of his mouth went a sharp twoedged sword: and his countenance [was] as the sun shineth in his strength. {17} And when I saw him, I fell at his feet as dead. And he laid his right hand upon me, saying unto me, Fear not; I am the first and the last:”


The Son [ben:H1121] Of Abinoam [’Abiyno`am:H42] 


Barak is also designated as “the son of Abinoam.” “Abinoam”  is a compound word, and consists of the word, “father” (’ab:H1) and “delight” (no`am:H5278). This term “delight” is found in 7 times in the Old Testament, as the following citations reveal, in which it is rendered as “the beauty,” “of pleasantness,” and “pleasant,” respectively: 


Psa 27:4 declares “One [thing] have I desired of the LORD, that will I seek after; that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to behold the beauty [no`am:H5278] of the LORD, and to enquire in his temple.”


Referring to “Wisdom” (which typifies the Lord Jesus Christ), Pro 3:17 affirms: “Her ways [are] ways of pleasantness [no`am:H5278], and all her paths [are] peace.”


Pro 16:24 likewise reveals: Pleasant [no`am:H5278] words [are as] an honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.”


Out Of Kedeshnaphtali [Qedesh:H6943]


Kedeshnaphtali [Qedesh:H6943] is also indentically spelled to “qadash” (H6942), which is translated as “sanctify,”“hallow,” and “dedicate” in the main. Here are a couple of examples: 


Gen 2:3 translates this word as, “and sanctified it”: “And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it [qadash:H6942]: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.”


Zep 1:7 deals with our current “day of judgment,” and this term appears as, “he hath bid”: “Hold thy peace at the presence of the Lord GOD: for the day of the LORD [is] at hand: for the LORD hath prepared a sacrifice, he hath bid [qadash:H6942] his guests.”


Lord willing, in our next study, we will learn more about what he and Deborah plan to do with regard to Sisera.











































 






 






   





  









 














Judges 4 - Part 7

Air Date: May 8, 2017



We read in Judges 4:4-7, “And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment. {6} And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go and draw toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


And [Deborah] Said unto him [Barak], Hath Not The LORD God Of Israel Commanded [tsava:H6680], [Saying]


We are on verse 5, and we left off at this statement by judge Deborah (she represents the Word of God) to Barak (who typifies Christ): “...and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded , [saying]...” The word for “command” (tsava:H668) is found throughout the Old Testament, and we encountered it before in Jud 2:20 and Jud 3:4 respectively,  


I’ll read verse 16-23 of Judges 2, which serves to outline the historical theme that is woven throughout the book of Judges, in which this word is rendered “which I commanded” in verse 20: “Nevertheless the LORD raised up judges, which delivered them out of the hand of those that spoiled them. {17} And yet they would not hearken unto their judges, but they went a whoring after other gods, and bowed themselves unto them: they turned quickly out of the way which their fathers walked in, obeying the commandments of the LORD; [but] they did not so. {18} And when the LORD raised them up judges, then the LORD was with the judge, and delivered them out of the hand of their enemies all the days of the judge: for it repented the LORD because of their groanings by reason of them that oppressed them and vexed them. {19} And it came to pass, when the judge was dead, [that] they returned, and corrupted [themselves] more than their fathers, in following other gods to serve them, and to bow down unto them; they ceased not from their own doings, nor from their stubborn way. {20} And the anger of the LORD was hot against Israel; and he said, Because that this people hath transgressed my covenant which I commanded their fathers, and have not hearkened unto my voice; {21} I also will not henceforth drive out any from before them of the nations which Joshua left when he died: {22} That through them I may prove Israel, whether they will keep the way of the LORD to walk therein, as their fathers did keep [it], or not. {23} Therefore the LORD left those nations, without driving them out hastily; neither delivered he them into the hand of Joshua. And the anger of the LORD was hot against Israel; and he said, Because that this people hath transgressed my covenant which I commanded [tsava:H6680] their fathers, and have not hearkened unto my voice;”


Verses 1-4 in Judges 3 continues in the same vein, in which this term is translated as “which he commanded” in verse 4: “And they were to prove Israel by them, to know whether they would hearken unto the commandments of the LORD, which he commanded [tsava:H6680] their fathers by the hand of Moses.”


Deborah Declares The Word Of God In A Rhetorical Question


We find Deborah invoking two of God’s manifold titles - “LORD” (Yehovah:H3068) and (the plural name for) “God” (elohiym:H430) as she poses this rhetorical question to Barak, which is nothing less than a command from the Almighty to “go”! (yalak:H3212). So we see in this verse the directive to “take action,” in essence, to “obey,” which, sadly, Israel failed to do, time and time again. Jud 2:12 and 19 illustrate this departure from the True and Living God, to serve the heathen gods of the nations round about them, in which these two terms, “God” (elohiym:H430) and “go” (yalak:H3212) are rendered as: “God”/”gods” and “follow(-ed)/(-ing)”: 


“And they forsook the LORD God [elohiym:H430] of their fathers, which brought them out of the land of Egypt, and followed [yalak:H3212] other gods [elohiym:H430], of the gods [elohiym:H430] of the people that [were] round about them, and bowed themselves unto them, and provoked the LORD to anger. ... {19}| And it came to pass, when the judge was dead, [that] they returned, and corrupted [themselves] more than their fathers, in following [yalak:H3212] other gods [elohiym:H430]  to serve them, and to bow down unto them; they ceased not from their own doings, nor from their stubborn way.”


Go [yalak:H3212] 


The usage of the word, “go” in Judges 4, however, highlights the obedience of Deborah and Barak in the historical context, as we see, jumping ahead for a second to verses 8 and 9,


“And Barak said unto her, If thou wilt go [yalak:H3212] with me, then I will go: but if thou wilt not go [yalak:H3212] with me, [then] I will not go [yalak:H3212]. {9} And she said, I will surely go [yalak:H3212] with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman. And Deborah arose, and went [yalak:H3212] with Barak to Kedesh.”


And Draw [mashak:H4900] Toward Mount [har:H2022] Tabor [Tabowr:H8396]


The command to “go” is also said in conjunction with the term, “and draw” in verse 6, and “And I will draw” in verse 7; I’ll read both again:


“And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go [yalak:H3212]  and draw [mashak:H4900] toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw [mashak:H4900] unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


This word, “draw” is also pregnant with meaning, and is translated in about 10 different ways - both positive as well as negative - in spite of appearing  in only 36 passages. Some of these include: literally “pull up,” “forbear,” “prolong,” “continue,” “extend,” “defer,” “sow” etc.; most often it takes the form of the word, “draw.” The following citations illustrate God’s usage of this term:


In Exo 19:13, we find a similar account to Jud 4:6-7, since a mountain (i.e., “kingdom”) is in view in both, and both relate to God’s judgment, however in this account, the term, “draw,” is translated as “soundeth long”: “There shall not an hand touch it, but he shall surely be stoned, or shot through; whether [it be] beast or man, it shall not live: when the trumpet soundeth long [mashak:H4900], they shall come up to the mount.”


Similarly, Jos 6:5 describes the defeat of Jericho, and spiritually points to the end of the world, by the 13 times the city was encircled by the Hebrews, typifying the 13,000th anniversary of Creation in 1988:


“And it shall come to pass, that when they make a long [blast] [mashak:H4900]  with the ram's horn, [and] when ye hear the sound of the trumpet, all the people shall shout with a great shout; and the wall of the city shall fall down flat, and the people shall ascend up every man straight before him.”

This term is also used in Job 41:1-2, and 12-34 in connection with Satan - typified by “leviathan” -  so it is similar to Judges 4 (and 5) with regards to Sisera, who also represents Satan - but as a defeated foe - as we noted with Eglon in Judges 3. God is essentially stating His superiority over Satan, even though God allowed him to reach the zenith of his power, as this chapter explains, since God placed him in charge of all of the churches and denominations, worldwide, and without exception, from May 21, 1988 - May 21, 2011. On that awesome date he was utterly vanquished by God; this term is rendered, “Canst thou draw out” in verse 1: 


“Canst thou draw out [mashak:H4900] leviathan with an hook? or his tongue with a cord [which] thou lettest down? {2} Canst thou put an hook into his nose? or bore his jaw through with a thorn? ... {12} I will not conceal his parts, nor his power, nor his comely proportion. {13} Who can discover the face of his garment? [or] who can come [to him] with his double bridle? {14} Who can open the doors of his face? his teeth [are] terrible round about. {15} [His] scales [are his] pride, shut up together [as with] a close seal. {16} One is so near to another, that no air can come between them. {17} They are joined one to another, they stick together, that they cannot be sundered. {18} By his neesings a light doth shine, and his eyes [are] like the eyelids of the morning. {19} Out of his mouth go burning lamps, [and] sparks of fire leap out. {20} Out of his nostrils goeth smoke, as [out] of a seething pot or caldron. {21} His breath kindleth coals, and a flame goeth out of his mouth. {22} In his neck remaineth strength, and sorrow is turned into joy before him. {23} The flakes of his flesh are joined together: they are firm in themselves; they cannot be moved. {24} His heart is as firm as a stone; yea, as hard as a piece of the nether [millstone]. {25} When he raiseth up himself, the mighty are afraid: by reason of breakings they purify themselves. {26} The sword of him that layeth at him cannot hold: the spear, the dart, nor the habergeon. {27} He esteemeth iron as straw, [and] brass as rotten wood. {28} The arrow cannot make him flee: slingstones are turned with him into stubble. {29} Darts are counted as stubble: he laugheth at the shaking of a spear. {30} Sharp stones [are] under him: he spreadeth sharp pointed things upon the mire. {31} He maketh the deep to boil like a pot: he maketh the sea like a pot of ointment. {32 He maketh a path to shine after him; [one] would think the deep [to be] hoary. {33} Upon earth there is not his like, who is made without fear. {34} He beholdeth all high [things]: he [is] a king over all the children of pride.


The demise of Satan is also in view in verse 22 of Isa 13:1-22, in which it is rendered as “shall not be prolonged,” at the end of the Great Tribilation on May 21, 2011, which again ties in to what we read in Judges 4: “The burden of Babylon, which Isaiah the son of Amoz did see. {2} Lift ye up a banner upon the high mountain, exalt the voice unto them, shake the hand, that they may go into the gates of the nobles. {3} I have commanded my sanctified ones, I have also called my mighty ones for mine anger, [even] them that rejoice in my highness. {4} The noise of a multitude in the mountains, like as of a great people; a tumultuous noise of the kingdoms of nations gathered together: the LORD of hosts mustereth the host of the battle. {5} They come from a far country, from the end of heaven, [even] the LORD, and the weapons of his indignation, to destroy the whole land. {6} Howl ye; for the day of the LORD [is] at hand; it shall come as a destruction from the Almighty. {7} Therefore shall all hands be faint, and every man's heart shall melt: {8} And they shall be afraid: pangs and sorrows shall take hold of them; they shall be in pain as a woman that travaileth: they shall be amazed one at another; their faces [shall be as] flames. {9} Behold, the day of the LORD cometh, cruel both with wrath and fierce anger, to lay the land desolate: and he shall destroy the sinners thereof out of it. {10} For the stars of heaven and the constellations thereof shall not give their light: the sun shall be darkened in his going forth, and the moon shall not cause her light to shine. {11} And I will punish the world for [their] evil, and the wicked for their iniquity; and I will cause the arrogancy of the proud to cease, and will lay low the haughtiness of the terrible. {12} I will make a man more precious than fine gold; even a man than the golden wedge of Ophir. {13} Therefore I will shake the heavens, and the earth shall remove out of her place, in the wrath of the LORD of hosts, and in the day of his fierce anger. {14} And it shall be as the chased roe, and as a sheep that no man taketh up: they shall every man turn to his own people, and flee every one into his own land. {15} Every one that is found shall be thrust through; and every one that is joined [unto them] shall fall by the sword. {16} Their children also shall be dashed to pieces before their eyes; their houses shall be spoiled, and their wives ravished. {17} Behold, I will stir up the Medes against them, which shall not regard silver; and [as for] gold, they shall not delight in it. {18} [Their] bows also shall dash the young men to pieces; and they shall have no pity on the fruit of the womb; their eye shall not spare children. {19} And Babylon, the glory of kingdoms, the beauty of the Chaldees' excellency, shall be as when God overthrew Sodom and Gomorrah. {20} It shall never be inhabited, neither shall it be dwelt in from generation to generation: neither shall the Arabian pitch tent there; neither shall the shepherds make their fold there. {21} But wild beasts of the desert shall lie there; and their houses shall be full of doleful creatures; and owls shall dwell there, and satyrs shall dance there. {22} And the wild beasts of the islands shall cry in their desolate houses, and dragons in [their] pleasant palaces: and her time [is] near to come, and her days shall not be prolonged.” [mashak:H4900] 


We’ll also look at one other passage, again relating to Satan’s destruction - typified by Pharaoh - in verse 20 of Eze 32:1-20, in which the term “draw” appears; notice too, the language of verses 7-8, which had to with the “darkening” of the spiritual timekeepers, at the onset of our current “day of judgment”: 


“And it came to pass in the twelfth year, in the twelfth month, in the first [day] of the month, [that] the word of the LORD came unto me, saying, {2} Son of man, take up a lamentation for Pharaoh king of Egypt, and say unto him, Thou art like a young lion of the nations, and thou [art] as a whale in the seas: and thou camest forth with thy rivers, and troubledst the waters with thy feet, and fouledst their rivers. {3} Thus saith the Lord GOD; I will therefore spread out my net over thee with a company of many people; and they shall bring thee up in my net. {4} Then will I leave thee upon the land, I will cast thee forth upon the open field, and will cause all the fowls of the heaven to remain upon thee, and I will fill the beasts of the whole earth with thee. {5} And I will lay thy flesh upon the mountains, and fill the valleys with thy height. {6} I will also water with thy blood the land wherein thou swimmest, [even] to the mountains; and the rivers shall be full of thee. {7} And when I shall put thee out, I will cover the heaven, and make the stars thereof dark; I will cover the sun with a cloud, and the moon shall not give her light. {8} All the bright lights of heaven will I make dark over thee, and set darkness upon thy land, saith the Lord GOD. {9} I will also vex the hearts of many people, when I shall bring thy destruction among the nations, into the countries which thou hast not known. {10} Yea, I will make many people amazed at thee, and their kings shall be horribly afraid for thee, when I shall brandish my sword before them; and they shall tremble at [every] moment, every man for his own life, in the day of thy fall. {11} For thus saith the Lord GOD; The sword of the king of Babylon shall come upon thee. {12} By the swords of the mighty will I cause thy multitude to fall, the terrible of the nations, all of them: and they shall spoil the pomp of Egypt, and all the multitude thereof shall be destroyed. {13} I will destroy also all the beasts thereof from beside the great waters; neither shall the foot of man trouble them any more, nor the hoofs of beasts trouble them. {14} Then will I make their waters deep, and cause their rivers to run like oil, saith the Lord GOD. {15} When I shall make the land of Egypt desolate, and the country shall be destitute of that whereof it was full, when I shall smite all them that dwell therein, then shall they know that I [am] the LORD. {16} This [is] the lamentation wherewith they shall lament her: the daughters of the nations shall lament her: they shall lament for her, [even] for Egypt, and for all her multitude, saith the Lord GOD. {17} It came to pass also in the twelfth year, in the fifteenth [day] of the month, [that] the word of the LORD came unto me, saying, {18} Son of man, wail for the multitude of Egypt, and cast them down, [even] her, and the daughters of the famous nations, unto the nether parts of the earth, with them that go down into the pit. {19} Whom dost thou pass in beauty? go down, and be thou laid with the uncircumcised. {20} They shall fall in the midst of [them that are] slain by the sword: she is delivered to the sword: draw her and all her multitudes.”


Well, I think we’ll stop here today, and Lord willing, continue our study next time.






Judges 4 - Part 8

Air Date: May 10, 2017


We read in Judges 4:4-7, “And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment. {6} And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go and draw toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


Tabor [Tabowr:H8396], Naphtali [Naphtaliy:H5321], And Zebulun [Zebuwluwn:H2074]


Previously we learned how God utilizes the word “draw” (mashak:H4900) in connection with Sisera in a number of passages that epitomized Satan’s downfall on May 21, 2011.


Today, we want to continue examining verse 6 in Judges 4, where we find three names mentioned: Mount Tabor, and the tribes of Naphtali, and Zebulun, from which Barak (a portrait of Christ) was commanded by God to recruit 10,000 men and head towards Mount Tabor, in this strategic battle plan that Deborah (representing the Word of God), under God’s direction and guidance, was told to orchestrate. The objective of this confrontation was to conquer Sisera - exemplifying Satan - once and for all. Remember too, that Sisera was the commander of Jabin’s (king of Canaan) army, and the Canaanites had subjugated Israel for the last 20 years.


Tabor [Tabowr:H8396]


Tabor is derived from a root word (tebar:H8406) that is closely related [it’s an Aramaic word and corresponds to the Hebrew term, “shabar”(H7665) and only appears in Dan 2:42, as the word, “broken,”] describing the image in Nebuchadnezzar’s dream, God having enabled Daniel to both understand, as well as interpret, the dream for the king in Dan 2:31-45; keep in mind that Nebuchadnezzar is another great type or figure of Satan:


“Thou, O king, sawest, and behold a great image. This great image, whose brightness [was] excellent, stood before thee; and the form thereof [was] terrible. {32} This image's head [was] of fine gold, his breast and his arms of silver, his belly and his thighs of brass, {33} His legs of iron, his feet part of iron and part of clay. {34} Thou sawest till that a stone was cut out without hands, which smote the image upon his feet [that were] of iron and clay, and brake them to pieces. {35} Then was the iron, the clay, the brass, the silver, and the gold, broken to pieces together, and became like the chaff of the summer threshingfloors; and the wind carried them away, that no place was found for them: and the stone that smote the image became a great mountain, and filled the whole earth. {36} This [is] the dream; and we will tell the interpretation thereof before the king. {37} Thou, O king, [art] a king of kings: for the God of heaven hath given thee a kingdom, power, and strength, and glory. {38} And wheresoever the children of men dwell, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the heaven hath he given into thine hand, and hath made thee ruler over them all. Thou [art] this head of gold. {39} And after thee shall arise another kingdom inferior to thee, and another third kingdom of brass, which shall bear rule over all the earth. {40} And the fourth kingdom shall be strong as iron: forasmuch as iron breaketh in pieces and subdueth all [things]: and as iron that breaketh all these, shall it break in pieces and bruise. {41} And whereas thou sawest the feet and toes, part of potters' clay, and part of iron, the kingdom shall be divided; but there shall be in it of the strength of the iron, forasmuch as thou sawest the iron mixed with miry clay. {42} And [as] the toes of the feet [were] part of iron, and part of clay, [so] the kingdom shall be partly strong, and partly broken. [shabar:H7665]  {43} And whereas thou sawest iron mixed with miry clay, they shall mingle themselves with the seed of men: but they shall not cleave one to another, even as iron is not mixed with clay. {44} And in the days of these kings shall the God of heaven set up a kingdom, which shall never be destroyed: and the kingdom shall not be left to other people, [but] it shall break in pieces and consume all these kingdoms, and it shall stand for ever. {45} Forasmuch as thou sawest that the stone was cut out of the mountain without hands, and that it brake in pieces the iron, the brass, the clay, the silver, and the gold; the great God hath made known to the king what shall come to pass hereafter: and the dream [is] certain, and the interpretation thereof sure.”


Zebulun [Zebuwluwn:H2074]


Part of the land that pertained to the tribes of Naphtali and Zebulun by lot, was situated in the vicinity of Mount Tabor, as we read in Jos 19:10-16, with respect to the tribe of Zebulun:


“And the third lot came up for the children of Zebulun [Zebuwluwn:H2074]

 according to their families: and the border of their inheritance was unto Sarid [Sariyd:H3801 - same as (sariyd:H3800) - “remaining” or “remnant”]: {11} And their border went up toward the sea, and Maralah [Mar`alah:H4831 - from (ra`al:H7477) - only used once as “terribly shaken”] and reached to Dabbasheth [Dabbesheth:H1708 - the same as (dabbesheth:H1707), “hump” (as a camel’s hump) - from the same as (debash:H1706), “honey”], and reached to the river that [is] before Jokneam [Yoqn@`am:H3362 - from (quwn:H6969), “lament” and (`am:H5971), “people” from (`amam:H6004) - “dim” or “hide”] ; {12} And turned from Sarid [Sariyd:H3801 - same as (sariyd:H3800) - “remaining” or “remnant”] eastward toward the sunrising unto the border of Chislothtabor [Kicloth Tabor:H3696 - from a compound word made up of (kecel:H3689) - “flank”/ “hope”/”folly”/ “loins”/ “confidence” and (Tabor:H8396), “broken”], and then goeth out to Daberath (or Daberah) [Daberath:H1707 - stems from (dabar:H1697) or “word” - like “Deborah” ], and goeth up to Japhia [Yaphiya:H3309 - from (yapha`:H3313), “shining”], {13} And from thence passeth on along on the east to Gittahhepher (or Gathhepher) [Gath-ha-Chepher:H1662 - from (gath:H1660), “winepress” and (chaphar:H2658), “dig”], to Ittahkazin [`Eth Qatsiyn:H5278 - from (`eth:H6256), “time” and (qayam:H7011), “sure,” or “stedfast”], and goeth out to Remmonmethoar [Rimmown:H7417 - the same as (rimmown:H7416), “pomegranate”] to Neah [Ne`ah:H5269 - from (nuwa`:H5128), “shake,” “wander,” “move”]; {14} And the border compasseth it on the north side to Hannathon [Channathon:H2116 - from (chanah:H2583), “pitch,” or “encamp”]: and the outgoings thereof are in the valley of Jiphthahel [Yiphtach-’el:H3317 - (pathach:H6605) “open” and (’el:H410), “God”: {15} And Kattath [Qattath:H7005 - from (qatan:H6996), “small”] and Nahallal [Nahallal:H5096 - same as (nahalol:H5097), “pasture” - from (nahal:H5095 - “guide”/ “lead”/ “fed”/ “carried” ], and Shimron [Shimrown:H8110 - from (shemer:H8105), “lees” “dregs” - from (shamar:H8104), “keep,” “observe”] , and Idalah [Yidalah:H3030 - “that which God has shown”], and Bethlehem [Beyth Lechem:H1035 - (bayith:H1004) “house” and (lechem:H3899), “of bread”]: twelve cities with their villages. {16} This [is] the inheritance of the children of Zebulun [Zebuwluwn:H2074] according to their families, these cities with their villages.” 


At this point, I’m not sure of the spiritual ramifications for listing these cities in this manner, but Lord willing, perhaps God will enable us to understand the larger spiritual picture behind this at some later date. There is also another point that I would like to bring to your attention, that might prove helpful, as we look for a spiritual solution to this matter:


  • After the Israelites crossed the Jordan River, and entered into the Promised Land (Canaan) both Naphtali and Zebulun, along with four other tribes were part of a group that were commanded to pronounce “curses” from atop Mt. Ebal. The other six tribes were directed to pronounce “blessings” on the opposite mountain - Mt. Gerizim, as we read in Deu 27:1-13,


“And Moses with the elders of Israel commanded the people, saying, Keep all the commandments which I command you this day. {2} And it shall be on the day when ye shall pass over Jordan unto the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, that thou shalt set thee up great stones, and plaister them with plaister: {3} And thou shalt write upon them all the words of this law, when thou art passed over, that thou mayest go in unto the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee, a land that floweth with milk and honey; as the LORD God of thy fathers hath promised thee. {4} Therefore it shall be when ye be gone over Jordan, [that] ye shall set up these stones, which I command you this day, in mount Ebal, and thou shalt plaister them with plaister. {5} And there shalt thou build an altar unto the LORD thy God, an altar of stones: thou shalt not lift up [any] iron [tool] upon them. {6} Thou shalt build the altar of the LORD thy God of whole stones: and thou shalt offer burnt offerings thereon unto the LORD thy God: {7} And thou shalt offer peace offerings, and shalt eat there, and rejoice before the LORD thy God. {8} And thou shalt write upon the stones all the words of this law very plainly. {9} And Moses and the priests the Levites spake unto all Israel, saying, Take heed, and hearken, O Israel; this day thou art become the people of the LORD thy God. {10} Thou shalt therefore obey the voice of the LORD thy God, and do his commandments and his statutes, which I command thee this day. {11} And Moses charged the people the same day, saying, {12} These shall stand upon mount Gerizim to bless the people, when ye are come over Jordan; Simeon, and Levi, and Judah, and Issachar, and Joseph, and Benjamin: {13} And these shall stand upon mount Ebal to curse; Reuben, Gad, and Asher, and Zebulun, Dan, and Naphtali.”


Naphtali [Naphtaliy:H5321]


The same is true with regards to the inheritance of the children of Naphtali in Jos 19:32-39, and again, I’m not sure of the spiritual import that these names signify; we know that there has to be a parabolic truth hidden all of these; for now, just being aware of their signification is a starting point:


“The sixth lot came out to the children of Naphtali, [even] for the children of Naphtali according to their families. {33] And their coast was from Heleph [Cheleph:H2501 - identical to (cheleph:H2500),  “in exchange for”], from Allon [’Allown:H438 - identical to (’allown:H437), “oak”] to Zaanannim [Tsa`ananniym:H6815 - plural of (tsa`an:H6818), “that shall not be taken down” ], and Adami [’Adamiy:H129 - from (’adamah:H127), “land,” or “earth” - same spelling as (’adam:H119), “red”] Nekeb [Neqeb:H5346 - same as (neqeb:H5345), “a hollow setting” (for a gemstone) or “cavern”] and Jabneel [Yabne’el:H2995 - from (banah:H1129), “build” and (’el:H410), “God”] unto Lakum [Laqquwm:H3946 - “fortification”?]; and the outgoings thereof were at Jordan [Yarden:H3383 - from (yarad:H3381), “come down, go down”]: {34} And [then] the coast turneth westward to Aznothtabor [’Aznoth Tabowr:H243 - from (’azan:H238), “give ear” and (Tabor:H8396), “broken”] (and goeth out from thence to Hukkok [Chuqqog:H2712 - from (chaqaq:H2710), “lawgiver”], and reacheth to Zebulun [Zebuwluwn:H2074 - “exalted”] on the south side, and reacheth to Asher [’Asher:H836 - from (’ashar:H833), “blessed”] on the west side, and to Judah [Yehuwdah:H3063 - “praise”] upon Jordan  [Yarden:H3383 - from (yarad:H3381), “come down, go down”] toward the sunrising. {35} And the fenced cities [are] Ziddim [Tsiddim:H6661 - plural of (tsad:H6654), “sides”] Zer [Tser:H6863 - “flint”?], and Hammath [Chammath:H2575 - from (chammah:H2535), plural of “sun;” “hot springs”?], Rakkath [Raqqath:H7557 - from (raqaq:H7556), “spit”], and Chinnereth [Kinnerowth:H3672 - plural of (kinnowr:H3658), “harp”], {36} And Adamah [’Adamah:H127 - the same as (’adamah:H127), “land,” or “earth” - same spelling as (’adam:H119), “red”], and Ramah [Ramah:H7414 - same as (ramah:H7413), “high place”], and Hazor [Chatsowr:H2674 - a form of (chatser:H2691), same as (chatsar:H2690), “sounded,” “blow”], {37] And Kedesh [Qedesh:H6943 - from (qadash:H6942), “sanctify”], and Edrei [’edre`iy:H154 - from (’edra`:H153), “mighty”], and Enhazor [`Eyn Chatsowr:H5877 - (`ayin:H5869), “eye” (or “fountain”?) and (Chatsowr:H2674) - a form of (chatser:H2691), same as (chatsar:H2690), “sounded,” “blow” , {38} And Iron [Yirown:H3375 - from (yare’:H3372), “to fear”] and Migdalel [Migdal’-’El:H4027 - from: (migdal:H4026), “tower” and (’el:H410), [of] “God”]  Horem [Chorem:H2765 - from (charam:H2763), “destroy”], and Bethanath [Beyth `Anoth:H1042 - from  (bayith:H1004) “house” and (`anah:H6030, [of] “answer” ], and Bethshemesh {Beyth Shemesh:H1053 - from (bayith:H1004) “house” and (shemesh:H8121), “sun”] ; nineteen cities with their villages. {39} This [is] the inheritance of the tribe of the children of Naphtali according to their families, the cities and their villages.” 


Judges 4 - Part 9

Air Date: May 12, 2017


We read in Judges 4:4-7, “And Deborah, a prophetess, the wife of Lapidoth, she judged Israel at that time. {5} And she dwelt under the palm tree of Deborah between Ramah and Bethel in mount Ephraim: and the children of Israel came up to her for judgment. {6} And she sent and called Barak the son of Abinoam out of Kedeshnaphtali, and said unto him, Hath not the LORD God of Israel commanded, [saying], Go and draw toward mount Tabor, and take with thee ten thousand men of the children of Naphtali and of the children of Zebulun? {7} And I will draw unto thee to the river Kishon Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


 And I Will Draw Unto Thee To The River Kishon Sisera


Deborah explains to Barak what her “battle plan” is in verse 7, 


“And I will draw unto thee to the river [nachal:H5158] Kishon [Qiyshown:H7028]  Sisera, the captain of Jabin's army, with his chariots and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand.”


Kishon [Qiyshown:H7028]


Besides, here in verse 7, the term Kishon (Qiqshown:H7028) appears in the following four passages: 


In Jud 4:13, we learn that Deborah’s (typifing the Word of God) plan (orchestrated by God) was successful: “And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon. [Qiyshown:H7028]



Jud 5:21 is part of the victory “song” that Barak and Deborah sang, in which the river is mentioned twice: “The river of Kishon  [Qiyshown:H7028] swept them away, that ancient river, the river Kishon.  [Qiyshown:H7028] O my soul, thou hast trodden down strength.”


In verse 9 of Psa 83:1-18 another reference to Kishon appears, as “of Kison;” this psalm is also a historical parable, regarding God’s victory over His enemies:


“[A Song [or] Psalm of Asaph.] Keep not thou silence, O God: hold not thy peace, and be not still, O God. {2} For, lo, thine enemies make a tumult: and they that hate thee have lifted up the head. {3} They have taken crafty counsel against thy people, and consulted against thy hidden ones. {4} They have said, Come, and let us cut them off from [being] a nation; that the name of Israel may be no more in remembrance. {5} For they have consulted together with one consent: they are confederate against thee: {6} The tabernacles of Edom, and the Ishmaelites; of Moab, and the Hagarenes; {7} Gebal, and Ammon, and Amalek; the Philistines with the inhabitants of Tyre; {8} Assur also is joined with them: they have holpen the children of Lot. Selah. {9} Do unto them as [unto] the Midianites; as [to] Sisera, as [to] Jabin, at the brook of Kison [Qiyshown:H7028]: {10} [Which] perished at Endor: they became [as] dung for the earth. {11} Make their nobles like Oreb, and like Zeeb: yea, all their princes as Zebah, and as Zalmunna: {12} Who said, Let us take to ourselves the houses of God in possession. {13} O my God, make them like a wheel; as the stubble before the wind. {14} As the fire burneth a wood, and as the flame setteth the mountains on fire; {15} So persecute them with thy tempest, and make them afraid with thy storm. {16} Fill their faces with shame; that they may seek thy name, O LORD. {17} Let them be confounded and troubled for ever; yea, let them be put to shame, and perish: {18} That [men] may know that thou, whose name alone [is] JEHOVAH, [art] the most high over all the earth.”



Elijah And The Prophets Of Baal 


In our last study we began looking at the citations that include the river, Kishon, and today I would like us to consider one last account, in verse 40 of 1 Kin 18:17-46. This chapter deals with the dramatic confrontation between Elijah - the one true prophet of God - and the hundreds of false prophets of Baal: 


“And it came to pass, when Ahab saw Elijah, that Ahab said unto him, [Art] thou he that troubleth Israel? {18} And he answered, I have not troubled Israel; but thou, and thy father's house, in that ye have forsaken the commandments of the LORD, and thou hast followed Baalim. {19} Now therefore send, [and] gather to me all Israel unto mount Carmel, and the prophets of Baal four hundred and fifty, and the prophets of the groves four hundred, which eat at Jezebel's table. {20} So Ahab sent unto all the children of Israel, and gathered the prophets together unto mount Carmel. {21} And Elijah came unto all the people, and said, How long halt ye between two opinions? if the LORD [be] God, follow him: but if Baal, [then] follow him. And the people answered him not a word. {22} Then said Elijah unto the people, I, [even] I only, remain a prophet of the LORD; but Baal's prophets [are] four hundred and fifty men. {23} Let them therefore give us two bullocks; and let them choose one bullock for themselves, and cut it in pieces, and lay [it] on wood, and put no fire [under]: and I will dress the other bullock, and lay [it] on wood, and put no fire [under]: {24} And call ye on the name of your gods, and I will call on the name of the LORD: and the God that answereth by fire, let him be God. And all the people answered and said, It is well spoken. {25} And Elijah said unto the prophets of Baal, Choose you one bullock for yourselves, and dress [it] first; for ye [are] many; and call on the name of your gods, but put no fire [under]. {26} And they took the bullock which was given them, and they dressed [it], and called on the name of Baal from morning even until noon, saying, O Baal, hear us. But [there was] no voice, nor any that answered. And they leaped upon the altar which was made. {27} And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud: for he [is] a god; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, [or] peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked. {28} And they cried aloud, and cut themselves after their manner with knives and lancets, till the blood gushed out upon them. {29} And it came to pass, when midday was past, and they prophesied until the [time] of the offering of the [evening] sacrifice, that [there was] neither voice, nor any to answer, nor any that regarded. {30} And Elijah said unto all the people, Come near unto me. And all the people came near unto him. And he repaired the altar of the LORD [that was] broken down. {31} And Elijah took twelve stones, according to the number of the tribes of the sons of Jacob, unto whom the word of the LORD came, saying, Israel shall be thy name: {32} And with the stones he built an altar in the name of the LORD: and he made a trench about the altar, as great as would contain two measures of seed. {33} And he put the wood in order, and cut the bullock in pieces, and laid [him] on the wood, and said, Fill four barrels with water, and pour [it] on the burnt sacrifice, and on the wood. {34} And he said, Do [it] the second time. And they did [it] the second time. And he said, Do [it] the third time. And they did [it] the third time. {35} And the water ran round about the altar; and he filled the trench also with water. {36} And it came to pass at [the time of] the offering of the [evening] sacrifice, that Elijah the prophet came near, and said, LORD God of Abraham, Isaac, and of Israel, let it be known this day that thou [art] God in Israel, and [that] I [am] thy servant, and [that] I have done all these things at thy word. {37} Hear me, O LORD, hear me, that this people may know that thou [art] the LORD God, and [that] thou hast turned their heart back again. {38} Then the fire of the LORD fell, and consumed the burnt sacrifice, and the wood, and the stones, and the dust, and licked up the water that [was] in the trench. {39} And when all the people saw [it], they fell on their faces: and they said, The LORD, he [is] the God; the LORD, he [is] the God. {40} And Elijah said unto them, Take the prophets of Baal; let not one of them escape. And they took them: and Elijah brought them down to the brook Kishon, and slew them there. {41} And Elijah said unto Ahab, Get thee up, eat and drink; for [there is] a sound of abundance of rain. {42} So Ahab went up to eat and to drink. And Elijah went up to the top of Carmel; and he cast himself down upon the earth, and put his face between his knees, {43} And said to his servant, Go up now, look toward the sea. And he went up, and looked, and said, [There is] nothing. And he said, Go again seven times. {44} And it came to pass at the seventh time, that he said, Behold, there ariseth a little cloud out of the sea, like a man's hand. And he said, Go up, say unto Ahab, Prepare [thy chariot], and get thee down, that the rain stop thee not. {45} And it came to pass in the mean while, that the heaven was black with clouds and wind, and there was a great rain. And Ahab rode, and went to Jezreel. {46} And the hand of the LORD was on Elijah; and he girded up his loins, and ran before Ahab to the entrance of Jezreel.”


Before moving ahead in our study, I do want to leave you with one thought regarding Kison which is noteworthy. The root word for Kishon is “qowsh” (H6983), and it is only found in one passage, in which it is rendered as “and lay a snare” (or a trap) in verse 21 of Isa 29:20-21, which is exactly what happened with regards to Eglon, that we saw in Judges 3, and which will occur again with Sisera, as we continue on in this chapter:


“For the terrible one is brought to nought, and the scorner is consumed, and all that watch for iniquity are cut off: {21} That make a man an offender for a word, and lay a snare for him that reproveth in the gate, and turn aside the just for a thing of nought.”


The Victory Belongs To God


The foregoing accounts have one main thread in common - that of God’s victory over His enemies - typified by the non-elect in the kingdom of Satan, and represented by Sisera, or these other heathen nations. Often times, and in spite of overwhelming odds, God’s army is victorious, because the battle belongs to the LORD, as David, under divine inspiration, triumphantly announced to Goliath in 1 Sam 17:47-47,


“Then said David to the Philistine, Thou comest to me with a sword, and with a spear, and with a shield: but I come to thee in the name of the LORD of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel, whom thou hast defied. {46} This day will the LORD deliver thee into mine hand; and I will smite thee, and take thine head from thee; and I will give the carcases of the host of the Philistines this day unto the fowls of the air, and to the wild beasts of the earth; that all the earth may know that there is a God in Israel.{47} And all this assembly shall know that the LORD saveth not with sword and spear: for the battle [is] the LORD'S, and he will give you into our hands.


Other verses also underscore God’s strength and might in winning the battle for His people, demonstrating His complete sovereignty and unfathomable power, as the subsequnt passages maintain:


Exo 14:13 recounts the miraculous deliverance at the Red Sea from the greatest army of earth, which was no match for the Living God of the Bible: “And Moses said unto the people, Fear ye not, stand still, and see the salvation of the LORD, which he will shew to you to day: for the Egyptians whom ye have seen to day, ye shall see them again no more for ever.”


Likewise, 2 Chr 20:17 makes this glorious affirmation:Ye shall not [need] to fight in this [battle]: set yourselves, stand ye [still], and see the salvation of the LORD with you, O Judah and Jerusalem: fear not, nor be dismayed; to morrow go out against them: for the LORD [will be] with you.”


Psa 147:10-11 also asserts, “He delighteth not in the strength of the horse: he taketh not pleasure in the legs of a man. {11} The LORD taketh pleasure in them that fear him, in those that hope in his mercy.


2 Kin 19:35 depicts the death of 185,000 Assyrian soldiers by the LORD one fateful night, uderscoring God’s amazing ability and prowess as the “Man of war,” that He is: “And it came to pass that night, that the angel of the LORD went out, and smote in the camp of the Assyrians an hundred fourscore and five thousand: and when they arose early in the morning, behold, they [were] all dead corpses.”


Sisera...And His Multitude [hamown:H1995] And I Will Deliver Him Into Thine Hand

 

Let’s proceed to examine the word, “and his multitude” (hamown:H1995) in the phrase, “Sisera...and his multitude; and I will deliver him into thine hand,” as we have already considered the others words in this verse in some of our previous studies. Keep in mind that the “hand” represents one’s will, and Sisera is going to be delivered (or “given”) into Barak’s and Deborah’s hands, even though as we shall see, the honor of killing him, will be reserved for a woman, by the name of Jael (who represents the elect), Psa 149:5-9, for example, reinforces the truth that God in conjunction with His people share in the judgment process, even as they did during the “day of salvation”:


Psa 149:5-9, “Let the saints be joyful in glory: let them sing aloud upon their beds. {6} [Let] the high [praises] of God [be] in their mouth, and a twoedged sword in their hand; {7} To execute vengeance upon the heathen, [and] punishments upon the people; {8} To bind their kings with chains, and their nobles with fetters of iron; {9} To execute upon them the judgment written: this honour have all his saints. Praise ye the LORD.”


The term, “and his multitude” (hamown:H1995) occurs 83 times in the following ways:  “multitude(62x), “noise(4x),tumult (4x),abundance(3x), “many(3x),store(2x), and once as:  “company,”multiplied,”riches,” rumbling,” and “sounding.” Here are a few illustrations of how God employs this term:


Both in Gen 17:4 and 5, it appears as the term, “of many” in the promise that God made to Abraham, which is also the meaning of his name: “As for me, behold, my covenant [is] with thee, and thou shalt be a father of many [hamown:H1995] nations. {5} Neither shall thy name any more be called Abram, but thy name shall be Abraham; for a father of many  nations [hamown:H1995] have I made thee.”


On the other hand, in the very moving account of David hearing the news of Abslaom’s death, this term is translated as “tumult” in verse 29 of 2 Sam 18:28-33, “And Ahimaaz called, and said unto the king, All is well. And he fell down to the earth upon his face before the king, and said, Blessed [be] the LORD thy God, which hath delivered up the men that lifted up their hand against my lord the king. {29} And the king said, Is the young man Absalom safe? And Ahimaaz answered, When Joab sent the king's servant, and [me] thy servant, I saw a great tumult [hamown:H1995], but I knew not what [it was]. {30} And the king said [unto him], Turn aside, [and] stand here. And he turned aside, and stood still. {31} And, behold, Cushi came; and Cushi said, Tidings, my lord the king: for the LORD hath avenged thee this day of all them that rose up against thee. {32} And the king said unto Cushi, Is the young man Absalom safe? And Cushi answered, The enemies of my lord the king, and all that rise against thee to do [thee] hurt, be as [that] young man [is]. {33} And the king was much moved, and went up to the chamber over the gate, and wept: and as he went, thus he said, O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom! would God I had died for thee, O Absalom, my son, my son!”


We’re going to stop here today. Lord willing, in our lext lesson we will pick up this study in Judges 4.


 






Judges 4 - Part 10

Air Date: May 31, 2017



“And Barak said unto her, If thou wilt go with me, then I will go: but if thou wilt not go with me, [then] I will not go. {9} And she said, I will surely go with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman. And Deborah arose, and went with Barak to Kedesh. {10} And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him.


We are down to verses 8-10 in our examination of Judges 4, and the curious phrase that Barak utters to Judge Deborah in verse 8:


 If Thou Wilt Go With Me, Then I Will Go: But If Thou Wilt Not Go With Me, [Then] I Will Not Go


To understand the spiritual ramifications of this statement (and Deborah’s threefold response in verses 9 and 10), we have to bear in mind that Barak [(Baraq:H1301) - found 13 times, and only in Jud 4 and 5; remember his name signifies “lightning,” since it is identically spelled as (baraq:H1300) - translated most commonly as “lightning” ] represents Christ, and Deborah [(Debowrah:H1683) - identically spelled to “bees” (debowrah:H1682) and stems from the term “speak”/ “word” (dabar:H1696/H1697)] typifies the Word of God. Christ and His Word are essentially inseparable, and so we see the very close connection in Barak’s and Deborah’s relationship, to the point that he asserts that he will not go, unless she accompanies him, which she wholeheartedly agrees to in verse 9a, 9c, and 10b:  “And she said, I will surely go with thee… And Deborah arose, and went with Barak to Kedesh…{10} and Deborah went up with him. ”


The Divine Harmony Within The Triune God


In considering their faithful affiliation, I was reminded of the glorious synergy that has eternally existed within the Godhead. Deu 19:15 highlights this amazing and holy cooperation, while setting up a legal precedent in the historical context:


“One witness shall not rise up against a man for any iniquity, or for any sin, in any sin that he sinneth: at the mouth of two witnesses, or at the mouth of three witnesses, shall the matter [dabar:H1697 - the grandparent root word for Deborah] be established.” 


We can see the practicality of this type of law, but we also discover a hidden spiritual reference to the nature of the Triune God, as 1 John 5:7 underscores, 


“For there are three that bear record [witness] in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one.” 


This is further accentuated in 2 Cor 13:1, as Paul makes this declaration, under divine inspiration; it’s worth noting that the word, “matter” (in Hebrew) is changed to “word” (in Greek):  “This is the third time I am coming to you. In the mouth [stoma:G4750] of two or three witnesses shall every word [rhema:G4487] be established.” 


The same Greek word for “mouth” in this verse is also used in verse 70 of Luke 1:67-70, as part of Zacharias’ (John the Baptist’s father) prophecy; please note the singular form of “mouth,” while referring to “his holy prophets” (plural) - since the entire Bible proceeds from the mouth of God: “And his father Zacharias was filled with the Holy Ghost, and prophesied, saying, {68} Blessed [be] the Lord God of Israel; for he hath visited and redeemed his people, {69} And hath raised up an horn of salvation for us in the house of his servant David; {70} As he spake by the mouth [stoma:G4750] of his holy prophets, which have been since the world began:”


As one becomes more and more familiar with the Bible, one marvels at how the members of the Godhead work in perfect harmony and communication with each other; they also continually glorify each other in the process, as these next citations illustrate:


For instance, in Heb 1:8-12, God the Father is glorifying God the Son: “But unto the Son [he saith], Thy throne, O God, [is] for ever and ever: a sceptre of righteousness [is] the sceptre of thy kingdom. {9} Thou hast loved righteousness, and hated iniquity; therefore God, [even] thy God, hath anointed thee with the oil of gladness above thy fellows. {10} And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine hands: {11} They shall perish; but thou remainest; and they all shall wax old as doth a garment; {12} And as a vesture shalt thou fold them up, and they shall be changed: but thou art the same, and thy years shall not fail.”


Christ, in turn, extols, God the Father in His “high priestly” prayer in John 17:1, 4, and 21-24: “These words spake Jesus, and lifted up his eyes to heaven, and said, Father, the hour is come; glorify thy Son, that thy Son also may glorify thee: ... {4} I have glorified thee on the earth: I have finished the work which thou gavest me to do. ... {21} That they all may be one; as thou, Father, [art] in me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me. {22} And the glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one: {23} I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me. {24} Father, I will that they also, whom thou hast given me, be with me where I am; that they may behold my glory, which thou hast given me: for thou lovedst me before the foundation of the world.


This is also the case with regard to God, the Holy Spirit, as John 15:26 describes His work: 


“But when the Comforter is come, whom I will send unto you from the Father, even the Spirit of truth, which proceedeth from the Father, he shall testify of me.” 


John 16:13-15 magnificently reveals this same perfect, flawless, and holy interaction: “Howbeit when he, the Spirit of truth, is come, he will guide you into all truth: for he shall not speak of himself; but whatsoever he shall hear, that shall he speak: and he will shew you things to come. He shall glorify me: for he shall receive of mine, and shall shew it unto you. All things that the Father hath are mine: therefore said I, that he shall take of mine, and shall shew it unto you.


We will also see this majestic interaction with respect to Barak and Deborah, both in this chapter as well as the next.


Notwithstanding [’ephec:H657] The Journey [derek:H1870] That Thou Takest [halak:H1980] Shall Not Be For Thine Honour [tiph’arah:H8597]


The next phrase that we want to investigate is in 9b: “...notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour…”, as Deborah provides Barak with further details pertaining to their mission. One is almost taken aback at the implication of this statement, since Barak represents the Lord Jesus Christ. After all, should not He receive all the honor due Him - as He is Lord of Lords and King of Kings? Ponder that for awhile, as we will return to this intriguing question. 


The Journey [derek:H1870] That Thou Takest [halak:H1980] 


Let’s begin by considering the two terms, “the journey” (derek:H18979) and “that thou takest” (halak:1980). We have encountered the word, “journey” before in our study of Jud 2, in which it surfaced in verses 17, 19, and 22 as “the way,” which is how it is predominantly rendered; in these verses we see the the first “gear” of the all too familiar cycle of “rebellion>oppression>deliverance>rest” that is woven throughout the period of the Judges. 


“And yet they would not hearken unto their judges, but they went a whoring after other gods, and bowed themselves unto them: they turned quickly out of the way  [derek:H1870] which their fathers walked in, obeying the commandments of the LORD; [but] they did not so. ... {19} And it came to pass, when the judge was dead, [that] they returned, and corrupted [themselves] more than their fathers, in following other gods to serve them, and to bow down unto them; they ceased not from their own doings, nor from their stubborn way. [derek:H1870]  ... {22} That through them I may prove Israel, whether they will keep the way [derek:H1870] of the LORD to walk therein, as their fathers did keep [it], or not.”


[Incidentally, it might be helpful to recollect that the period of Judges lasted for 360 years (1407 BC - 1047 BC, from the entrance into Canaan until Saul was crowned as king), as Mr. Camping noted in his books Adam When and Time Has An End.  However the book of Judges itself covers 299 years of those 360 years - from 1407 BC - 1108 BC, ending with the death of Samson.] 


Here are some examples of how God utilizes these two terms together, “the journey” (derek:H1870) and “that thou takest” (halak:1980):


Gen 28:20-22 reveals Jacob’s vow: “And Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way [derek:H1870] that I go [halak:H1980], and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, {21} So that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the LORD be my God: {22} And this stone, which I have set [for] a pillar, shall be God's house: and of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.” 


Deu 1:33 also chronicles God’s care for His corporate people:, Who went [halak:H1980] in the way [derek:H1870] before you, to search you out a place to pitch your tents [in], in fire by night, to shew you by what way [derek:H1870] ye should go, and in a cloud by day.”


Psa 86:11 echoes the desire of the true child of God: “Teach me thy way [derek:H1870], O LORD; I will walk [halak:H1980] in thy truth: unite my heart to fear thy name.”


Ecc 11:9 presents this warning: “Rejoice, O young man, in thy youth; and let thy heart cheer thee in the days of thy youth, and walk [halak:H1980] in the ways [derek:H1870] of thine heart, and in the sight of thine eyes: but know thou, that for all these [things] God will bring thee into judgment.”


Ecc 12:5 speaks of our present “day of judgment”: “Also [when] they shall be afraid of [that which is] high, and fears [shall be] in the way [derek:H1870], and the almond tree shall flourish, and the grasshopper shall be a burden, and desire shall fail: because man goeth [halak:H1980] to his long home, and the mourners go about the streets:”


Jer 10:23 annouces man’s utter dependency upon God: “O LORD, I know that the way of man [is] not in himself: [it is] not in man that walketh [halak:H1980] to direct his steps.”


And Mic 4:2 depicts those within the Body of Christ, “And many nations shall come [halak:H1980], and say, Come, and let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, and to the house of the God of Jacob; and he will teach us of his ways [derek:H1870], and we will walk in his paths: for the law shall go forth of Zion, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem.”


Notwithstanding [’ephec:H657] 


I want to back up a bit to investigate the first term, “Notwithstanding” (’ephec:H657) in this phrase, which I almost skipped over, assuming that it was merely a conjunction like our English word “but” (and it is indeed rendered as such once.) Was I ever wrong! I had to learn again the principle that every word in the Bible is critical, and this one is a good example. As I looked at the way God utilizes this word 43 times, I was struck with its parabolic richness, which I repeatedly refer to, as being “pregnant” with spiritual meaning; here is how it is rendered:  ends(13x), no(4x), none (3x), not(3x),nothing(2x), without(2x), else (2x), and the following appear once: beside,” but,” cause,” “howbeit,” “nevertheless,” “only,” “and the uttermost parts,” “save,” “but in the want,” “against thee shall be as nothing, and as a thing of nought,” “them without cause,” and lastly, “were to the ankles.” For a term that is found in 43 references, and translated 19 different ways is quite remarkable. However, we recognize above all, that God is the One that chose each of His God-breathed words, and infused into each of them, the various nuances that He specifically desired - whether a word is only used once, and always as such, or in 19 different ways. Well, on that note, let’s consider some of these passages that contain this expression:


In Num 22:35 this word is rendered as “but only”: “And the angel of the LORD said unto Balaam, Go with the men: but only [’ephec:H657] the word that I shall speak unto thee, that thou shalt speak. So Balaam went with the princes of Balak.”


Deu 33:17 translates this as “to the ends”: “His glory [is like] the firstling of his bullock, and his horns [are like] the horns of unicorns: with them he shall push the people together to the ends [’ephec:H657] of the earth: and they [are] the ten thousands of Ephraim, and they [are] the thousands of Manasseh.”


In Psa 2:8 it is rendered as “and the uttermost parts”: “Ask of me, and I shall give [thee] the heathen [for] thine inheritance, and the uttermost parts [’ephec:H657] of the earth [for] thy possession.”


Isa 40:17 expresses this word as “to him less than nothing”: “All nations before him [are] as nothing; and they are counted to him less than nothing [’ephec:H657], and vanity.”


Isa 45:6 translates this as “that there is none”: “That they may know from the rising of the sun, and from the west, that [there is] none [’ephec:H657] beside me. I [am] the LORD, and [there is] none else.”


Amo 9:8 expresses this as “saving”: “Behold, the eyes of the Lord GOD [are] upon the sinful kingdom, and I will destroy it from off the face of the earth; saving [’ephec:H657] that I will not utterly destroy the house of Jacob, saith the LORD.”


In these passages, along with others, there seems to be an emphasis on “the time of the end” as well as God’s majestic supremacy and power.


Shall Not Be For Thine Honour [tiph’arah:H8597]


The next word in the phrase, “...notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour…” is: shall not be for thine honour.” [tiph’arah:H8597] This term appears 51 times, and most of the time is rendered as: “glory,” “beautiful,” and “beauty” as the subsequent citations testify:


1 Chr 29:11 and 13 offer this heavenly peaen, which is translated as “and the glory,” and “thy glorious” respectively: “Thine, O LORD, [is] the greatness, and the power, and the glory [tiph’arah:H8597], and the victory, and the majesty: for all [that is] in the heaven and in the earth [is thine]; thine [is] the kingdom, O LORD, and thou art exalted as head above all. ... {13} Now therefore, our God, we thank thee, and praise thy glorious [tiph’arah:H8597] name.”


In Est 1:4, king Ahashuerus typifies, God the Father, in which this word is rendered as “of his excellent”: “When he shewed the riches of his glorious kingdom and the honour of his excellent majesty many days, [even] an hundred and fourscore days.”


I’ll stop here today, and Lord willing, we will continue our study in the book of Judges, in our next Bible study.





Judges 4 - Part 11

Air Date: June 2, 2017


“And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon.”


And Barak Called Zebulun And Naphtali To Kedesh 


We have arrived at verse 10 in our investigation of Jud 4, and we want to look at the first phrase, “And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh…”


In Jud 4:6, I mentioned Kedesh or Kedeshnaphtali [Qedesh:H6943], which is also identically spelled to “qadash” (H6942), and is translated as “sanctify,”“hallow,” and “dedicate” in the main. Here are a couple of examples: 


Gen 2:3 translates this word as, “and sanctified it”: “And God blessed the seventh day, and sanctified it [qadash:H6942]: because that in it he had rested from all his work which God created and made.”


Zep 1:7 deals with our current “day of judgment,” and this term appears as, “he hath bid”: “Hold thy peace at the presence of the Lord GOD: for the day of the LORD [is] at hand: for the LORD hath prepared a sacrifice, he hath bid [qadash:H6942] his guests.”


Verse 12 of Lev 8:10-12 provides a description of  how Aaron was sanctified for his high priestly office, as he represented the Lord Jesus Christ:  “And he poured of the anointing oil upon Aaron's head, and anointed him, to sanctify him.”

So we see that Barak gathers his forces from both the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali, whose borders were in the vicinity of Kedesh. We encountered the term“called” (za`aq:H2199) in Jud 3:9 and 15, in which it was rendered as “cried,” which is how this word is predominantly

 rendered:


“And when the children of Israel cried [za`aq:H2199] unto the LORD, the LORD raised up a deliverer to the children of Israel, who delivered them, [even] Othniel the son of Kenaz, Caleb's younger brother…  {15} But when the children of Israel cried [za`aq:H2199]  unto the LORD, the LORD raised them up a deliverer, Ehud the son of Gera, a Benjamite, a man lefthanded: and by him the children of Israel sent a present unto Eglon the king of Moab.”


We will also run across this word in verse 13, of this chapter, where it is translated as “gathered together,” as it is rendered as such, a few other times as well, and we will see this term again, as it appears from time to time in the book of Judges:


“And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon.”


 And He Went Up [`alah:H5927] With Ten [`eser:H6235] Thousand [’eleph:H505] Men [’iysh:H376] At His Feet [regel:H7272]: And Deborah [Debowrah:H1683] Went Up [`alah:H5927] With Him 


The next phrase that we want to consider in verse 10 is: “...and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him.”  There are a number of passages that utilize the same three Hebrew terms for “ten,” “thousand” and “men,” but in the chapters where they are found, they refer to the non-elect that are being vanquished, as the following passages that we have previously looked at in Judges 1:4, and 3:29 respectively indicate:


“And Judah went up; and the LORD delivered the Canaanites and the Perizzites into their hand: and they slew of them in Bezek ten thousand men.”


“And they slew of Moab at that time about ten [`eser:H6235] thousand [’eleph:H505] men [’iysh:H376], all lusty, and all men [’iysh:H376] of valour; and there escaped not a man.” [’iysh:H376]


However, it’s worth noting that there is another term, that is one Hebrew word - “rebabah” (H7233) - which is translated predominantly as “ten thousand” (13x), and once as

 “millions,” “myraid,” and “multiply;” spiritually this is a reference to the elect, as these next passages highlight:


Deu 33:2, and 17: “And he said, The LORD came from Sinai, and rose up from Seir unto them; he shined forth from mount Paran, and he came with ten thousands [rebabah:H7233] of saints [qodesh:H6944 - stems from the same root word (qadash:H6942) - as Kadesh, or Kadeshnaphtali - (Qedesh:H6943) that we looked at earlier in our lesson, as “sanctified” or “he hath bid”: from his right hand [went] a fiery law for them. ... {17} His glory [is like] the firstling of his bullock, and his horns [are like] the horns of unicorns: with them he shall push the people together to the ends of the earth: and they [are] the ten thousands [rebabah:H7233] of Ephraim, and they [are] the thousands of Manasseh.”


Psa 3:6, “I will not be afraid of ten thousands [rebabah:H7233] of people, that have set [themselves] against me round about.”


Psa 91:7, “A thousand shall fall at thy side, and ten thousand [rebabah:H7233]  at thy right hand; [but] it shall not come nigh thee.”


Sng 5:10, “My beloved [is] white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.” [rebabah:H7233] 


Eze 16:7, “I have caused thee to multiply [rebabah:H7233] as the bud of the field, and thou hast increased and waxen great, and thou art come to excellent ornaments: [thy] breasts are fashioned, and thine hair is grown, whereas thou [wast] naked and bare.”


In a devotional that I did in the book of Jude, we considered verses 14-15, which speaks of our day, in which God is using His elect in the judgment process, and harkening all the way back to Enoch - the seventh from Adam!


“And Enoch also, the seventh from Adam, prophesied of these, saying, Behold, the Lord cometh with ten thousands [myrias:G3461] of his saints, {15} To execute judgment upon all, and to convince all that are ungodly among them of all their ungodly deeds which they have ungodly committed, and of all their hard [speeches] which ungodly sinners have spoken against him.”  


Following this same train of thought, we can also think of 1 Cor 6:2 a, as well as Psa 149:6-9 respectively,


“Do ye not know that the saints shall judge the world?...”


Psa 149:5-9, “Let the saints be joyful in glory: let them sing aloud upon their beds. {6} [Let] the high [praises] of God [be] in their mouth, and a twoedged sword in their hand; {7} To execute vengeance upon the heathen, [and] punishments upon the people; {8} To bind their kings with chains, and their nobles with fetters of iron; {9} To execute upon them the judgment written: this honour have all his saints. Praise ye the LORD.”


And He Went Up [`alah:H5927]... At His Feet [regel:H7272]


We have researched the term “and he went up” (`alah:H5927) a number of times in some of our past lessons throughout this series, but never (as far as I can recall) together with “at his feet,” (regel:H7272) which we find here in Jud 4:10, with regard to Barak first, and then Deborah. In the historical context we note that the 10,000 men “at his feet” were from the tribes of Zebulun and Naphtali, as Deborah, under divine inspiration, had been instructed by God. As I mentioned previously, these 10,000 men represent the elect, that are taking part in this upcoming battle that really represents the warfare between the kingdom of Satan (headed by Sisera), and the Kingdom of the Lord Jesus Christ (represented by Barak and judge Deborah) ...and one other “woman” that will be revealed later on this chapter, and will answer the question I posed in our last study with respect to Deborah’s intriguing statement to Barak in verse 9a:


“And she said, I will surely go with thee: notwithstanding the journey that thou takest shall not be for thine honour; for the LORD shall sell Sisera into the hand of a woman…”


For the present, let us consider the four other passages that contain the two terms, “and he went up” (`alah:H5927), and “at his feet,” (regel:H7272):


In verse 19 of Num 20:14-21, these two words are translated as “unto him we will go” and “on my feet;” keep in mind that Edom is related to Esau, and he represents the institutional churches and denominations that came under the judgment of God as of May 21, 1988: “And Moses sent messengers from Kadesh unto the king of Edom, Thus saith thy brother Israel, Thou knowest all the travail that hath befallen us: {15}| How our fathers went down into Egypt, and we have dwelt in Egypt a long time; and the Egyptians vexed us, and our fathers: {16} And when we cried unto the LORD, he heard our voice, and sent an angel, and hath brought us forth out of Egypt: and, behold, we [are] in Kadesh, a city in the uttermost of thy border: {17} Let us pass, I pray thee, through thy country: we will not pass through the fields, or through the vineyards, neither will we drink [of] the water of the wells: we will go by the king's [high] way, we will not turn to the right hand nor to the left, until we have passed thy borders. {18} And Edom said unto him, Thou shalt not pass by me, lest I come out against thee with the sword. {19} And the children of Israel said unto him, We will go [`alah:H5927] by the high way: and if I and my cattle drink of thy water, then I will pay for it: I will only, without [doing] any thing [else], go through on my feet. [regel:H7272] {20} And he said, Thou shalt not go through. And Edom came out against him with much people, and with a strong hand. {21} Thus Edom refused to give Israel passage through his border: wherefore Israel turned away from him.” 


In verse 18 of Jos 4:10-18, these two terms are rendered as “were come up” and “feet,” in this account, which is reminiscent of the parting of the Red Sea in Exodus, as both bodies of water represent the grave (or “hell”), which Christ had to first succumb to, on behalf of His elect, from the “foundation of the world,” and typified by the priests who were the first to enter into the water, and the last to exit: “For the priests which bare the ark stood in the midst of Jordan, until every thing was finished that the LORD commanded Joshua to speak unto the people, according to all that Moses commanded Joshua: and the people hasted and passed over. {11} And it came to pass, when all the people were clean passed over, that the ark of the LORD passed over, and the priests, in the presence of the people. {12} And the children of Reuben, and the children of Gad, and half the tribe of Manasseh, passed over armed before the children of Israel, as Moses spake unto them: {13} About forty thousand prepared for war passed over before the LORD unto battle, to the plains of Jericho. {14} On that day the LORD magnified Joshua in the sight of all Israel; and they feared him, as they feared Moses, all the days of his life.And it came to pass, when the priests that bare the ark of the covenant of the LORD were come up [`alah:H5927] out of the midst of Jordan, [and] the soles of the priests' feet [regel:H7272] were lifted up unto the dry land, that the waters of Jordan returned unto their place, and flowed over all his banks, as [they did] before.”


In verse 13, of 1 Sam 14:6-15 God sets forth an important Biblical principle, spoken by Jonathan, and illustrated in this historical parable by him and his armor bearer; notice too how often the term, “come up” (`alah:H5927) is found in these verses: “And Jonathan said to the young man that bare his armour, Come, and let us go over unto the garrison of these uncircumcised: it may be that the LORD will work for us: for [there is] no restraint to the LORD to save by many or by few. {7} And his armourbearer said unto him, Do all that [is] in thine heart: turn thee; behold, I [am] with thee according to thy heart. {8} Then said Jonathan, Behold, we will pass over unto [these] men, and we will discover ourselves unto them. {9} If they say thus unto us, Tarry until we come to you; then we will stand still in our place, and will not go up [`alah:H5927] unto them. {10} But if they say thus, Come up [`alah:H5927] unto us; then we will go up: for the LORD hath delivered them into our hand: and this [shall be] a sign unto us. {11} And both of them discovered themselves unto the garrison of the Philistines: and the Philistines said, Behold, the Hebrews come forth out of the holes where they had hid themselves. {12} And the men of the garrison answered Jonathan and his armourbearer, and said, Come up [`alah:H5927] to us, and we will shew you a thing. And Jonathan said unto his armourbearer, Come up [`alah:H5927] after me: for the LORD hath delivered them into the hand of Israel. {13} And Jonathan climbed up [`alah:H5927] upon his hands and upon his feet, [regel:H7272] and his armourbearer after him: and they fell before Jonathan; and his armourbearer slew after him. {14} And that first slaughter, which Jonathan and his armourbearer made, was about twenty men, within as it were an half acre of land, [which] a yoke [of oxen might plow]. {15} And there was trembling in the host, in the field, and among all the people: the garrison, and the spoilers, they also trembled, and the earth quaked: so it was a very great trembling.”


Verse 2 of Psa 40:2, speaks of the “pit” and “miry clay” associated with death and annihilation which Christ overcame for His elect saints: “[To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David.] I waited patiently for the LORD; and he inclined unto me, and heard my cry. {2} He brought me up  [`alah:H5927]  also out of an horrible pit, out of the miry clay, and set my feet [regel:H7272] upon a rock, [and] established my goings.”


So we see that these two words, “and he went up” and “at his feet”  primarily emphasizes Christ’s victory - and by extension the victory of the elect - over death and annihilation as well as the kingdom of Satan.


Well, on that note we’ll have to bring today’s study to a close, and Lord willing, we will continue our examination of Jud 4, next week.




Judges 4 - Part 12

Air Date: June 5, 2017


“And Barak called Zebulun and Naphtali to Kedesh; and he went up with ten thousand men at his feet: and Deborah went up with him. {11} Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh. {12} And they shewed Sisera that Barak the son of Abinoam was gone up to mount Tabor. {13} And Sisera gathered together all his chariots, [even] nine hundred chariots of iron, and all the people that [were] with him, from Harosheth of the Gentiles unto the river of Kishon.”


Now Heber [Cheber:H2268] The Kenite [Qeyniy:H7017]...Had Severed [parad:H6504] Himself From The Kenites  [Qeyniy:H7017]


We are down to verse 11 in our examination of Judges 4, and we are going to be introduced to Heber the Kenite, and eventually Heber’s wife, Jael. We learn that Heber, who was descended from “the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses,” had “severed” or “separated” himself from the Kenites.  


Some Background On The Children Of Hobab The Father In Law Of Moses” 


In trying to identify who “...“the children of Hobab the father in law of Moses” are, I’m going to refer back to an earlier lesson in Judges 1 - Part 36: Moses’ father-in-law, known as  “the priest of Midian,” is assigned three different names in the Bible, and had 7 daughters, one of which, Zipporah, whom he gave to Moses in marriage as we read in Exodus 2:16 and 21,


“Now the priest of Midian [Midyan:H4080] had seven daughters: and they came and drew [water], and filled the troughs to water their father's flock. ... {21} And Moses was content to dwell with the man: and he gave Moses Zipporah his daughter.


Apparently, the Midianites were the descendants of Midian, one of Abraham’s sons through Keturah, as we learn from Genesis 25:1-2


“Then again Abraham took a wife, and her name [was] Keturah. {2} And she bare him Zimran, and Jokshan, and Medan, and Midian [Midyan:H4080], and Ishbak, and Shuah.”


Moses - A Man With Three Names!


It’s noteworthy that God assigns three different names to Moses’ father-in-law: “Reuel” (or “Raguel”), “Jethro,” and “Hobab”:


“Reuel”


We first read about “Reuel” (a compound term which apparently means “friend of God”) in Exodus 2:18,


“ And when they [his daughters] came to Reuel [R@`uw’el:H7467] their father, he said, How [is it that] ye are come so soon to day?”


“Jethro”


The name, “Jethro” (Yithrow:H3503) [apparently signifying “his abundance” according to the Blue Letter Bible, but the root word it is derived from (yether:H3499) is generally rendered as “rest,” “remnant,” or “residue,” which I think is more accurate] appears next in 9 citations, such as Exodus 3:1,


“Now Moses kept the flock of Jethro [Yithrow:H3503] his father in law, the priest of Midian: and he led the flock to the backside of the desert, and came to the mountain of God, [even] to Horeb.


It is also found as “Jethro” in Exodus 4:18, even though this verse appears under both Strong numbers - H3503 and H3500 - although every other time H3500 is rendered as “Jether,” and pertains to a different person altogether:


“And Moses went and returned to Jethro [Yithrow:H3503] [Yether:H3500] his father in law, and said unto him, Let me go, I pray thee, and return unto my brethren which [are] in Egypt, and see whether they be yet alive. And Jethro said to Moses, Go in peace.”


“Hobab”


Lastly, “Hobab” (apparently meaning “cherished”) surfaces in the following two passages:


Numbers 10:29 declares, “And Moses said unto Hobab, [Chobab:H2246] the son of Raguel the Midianite, Moses' father in law, We are journeying unto the place of which the LORD said, I will give it you: come thou with us, and we will do thee good: for the LORD hath spoken good concerning Israel.”


Had Severed [parad:H6504] Himself From The Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017]


With that background in mind, let’s take a closer look at Judges 4:11,


“Now Heber the Kenite, [which was] of the children of Hobab [Chobab:H2246] the father in law of Moses, had severed himself from the Kenites, and pitched his tent unto the plain of Zaanaim, which [is] by Kedesh.”


Judges 4:11 is actually a very helpful verse in that it provides a clue in identifying who “the children of Moses’ father-in-law” represent, since we read that Heber “had severed” (parad:H6504) himself  from the Kenites. Here are some examples of how God uses this word, “had severed”:


Genesis 13:9 recounts the separation of Abraham and Lot, in order to stop the stife that existed between their respective herdsmen: “[Is] not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, [parad:H6504] I pray thee, from me: if [thou wilt take] the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if [thou depart] to the right hand, then I will go to the left.”


And in Genesis 25:23, God answers Rebekah’s question: “And the LORD said unto her, Two nations [are] in thy womb, and two manner of people shall be separated [parad:H6504] from thy bowels; and [the one] people shall be stronger than [the other] people; and the elder [Esau] shall serve the younger.” [Jacob]


Deuteronomy 32:8 further reveals, “When the most High divided to the nations their inheritance, when he separated [parad:H6504] the sons of Adam, he set the bounds of the people according to the number of the children of Israel.”


Lastly, in verse 17 of Ruth 1:16-17, Ruth solemnly declares her allegiance to Jehovah God, and to her mother-in-law, Naomi, and her people (representing God’s elect): “And Ruth said, Intreat me not to leave thee [Naomi], [or] to return from following after thee: for whither thou goest, I will go; and where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people [shall be] my people, and thy God my God: Where thou diest, will I die, and there will I be buried: the LORD do so to me, and more also, [if ought] but death part [parad:H6504] thee and me.”


So in the case of Heber - who had separated himself from the Kenites - and particularly the actions of his wife, Jael, we have grounds to assume that, at the very least, they typify the elect.


Himself From The Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017]


The word that is translated Kenites (Qeyniy:H7017) is found 13 times, as we note from the following passages:


Immediately following the sacrifice which Abraham made according to God’s instructions, we read in verse 19 of Genesis 15:18-21 this prophetic “footnote”: “In the same day the LORD made a covenant with Abram, saying, Unto thy seed have I given this land, from the river of Egypt unto the great river, the river Euphrates: {19} The Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and the Kenizzites, and the Kadmonites, {20} And the Hittites, and the Perizzites, and the Rephaims, {21} And the Amorites, and the Canaanites, and the Girgashites, and the Jebusites.”


The Kenites are also mentioned in verse 21 and its root word (Qayin:H7014) rendered, “Nevertheless the Kenite,” appears in verse 22 of Numbers 24:15-23, as part of Balaam’s parable (which incidentally is repeated four times - pointing to “universality” or “the furthest extent of what is in view”!): “And he took up his parable, and said, Balaam the son of Beor hath said, and the man whose eyes are open hath said: {16} He hath said, which heard the words of God, and knew the knowledge of the most High, [which] saw the vision of the Almighty, falling [into a trance], but having his eyes open: {17} I shall see him, but not now: I shall behold him, but not nigh: there shall come a Star out of Jacob, and a Sceptre shall rise out of Israel, and shall smite the corners of Moab, and destroy all the children of Sheth. {18} And Edom shall be a possession, Seir also shall be a possession for his enemies; and Israel shall do valiantly. {19} Out of Jacob shall come he that shall have dominion, and shall destroy him that remaineth of the city. {20} And when he looked on Amalek, he took up his parable, and said, Amalek [was] the first of the nations; but his latter end [shall be] that he perish for ever. {21} And he looked on the Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and took up his parable, and said, Strong is thy dwellingplace, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock. {22} Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014] shall be wasted, until Asshur shall carry thee away captive. {23} And he took up his parable, and said, Alas, who shall live when God doeth this!”


When we were in Judges 1, we also ran across the root word, “of the Kenite” (Qeyniy:H7017) in verse 16: “And the children of the Kenite [Qeyniy:H7017], Moses' father in law, went up out of the city of palm trees with the children of Judah into the wilderness of Judah, which [lieth] in the south of Arad; and they went and dwelt among the people.”


Who Do The Kenites Typify Spiritually?


I want to take a detour to investigate verses 21-22 in Numbers 24 (Balaam’s parable) that relate to the Kenites, as this will help us to see the larger spiritual picture of why Heber separated himself from them: 


And he looked on the Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and took up his parable, and said, Strong is thy dwellingplace, and thou puttest thy nest in a rock. {22} Nevertheless the Kenite [Qayin:H7014] shall be wasted, until Asshur shall carry thee away captive.”


And He Looked [ra`ah:H7200] On The Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017] And Took Up [nasa’:H5375] His Parable [mashal:H4912]


And Took Up [nasa’:H5375] His Parable [mashal:H4912]


Let’s start with the two terms, “and took up his parable” in the phrase, “And he looked on the Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017], and took up his parable [mashal:H4912] …” This word is also rendered “proverb” about as many times as it is translated as “parable,” and both constitute something in which God has hidden spiritual truth. It could be a person, or group of people - as the Kenites, a historical account, or any other portion of Scripture, since God has written the Bible to be understood parabolically. Here are a few examples:


Deuteronomy 28 is a chapter that discusses the blessings of obedience, as well as the many more curses related to disobedience, in which the term, “parable” appears in verse 37; I’ll also read verse 15 first, as it sets the tone for this section of curses: “But it shall come to pass, if thou wilt not hearken unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe to do all his commandments and his statutes which I command thee this day; that all these curses shall come upon thee, and overtake thee: …{36} The LORD shall bring thee, and thy king which thou shalt set over thee, unto a nation which neither thou nor thy fathers have known; and there shalt thou serve other gods, wood and stone. {37} And thou shalt become an astonishment, a proverb [mashal:H4912], and a byword, among all nations whither the LORD shall lead thee.”


Psalm 49:4 reveals, “I will incline mine ear to a parable [mashal:H4912]: I will open my dark saying upon the harp.”

In similar fashion, verse 2 of Psalm 78 includes this term, which surprisingly, outlines the history of the nation of Israel, which further underscores the fact that the Bible is a bottomless well of spiritual wisdom, even if the terms, “parable,” or “proverb” are not in view: “I will open my mouth in a parable [mashal:H4912]: I will utter dark sayings of old:”


Verse 6 of Proverbs 1:1-6 also maintains: “The proverbs of Solomon the son of David, king of Israel; {2} To know wisdom and instruction; to perceive the words of understanding; {3} To receive the instruction of wisdom, justice, and judgment, and equity; {4} To give subtilty to the simple, to the young man knowledge and discretion. {5} A wise [man] will hear, and will increase learning; and a man of understanding shall attain unto wise counsels: {6} To understand a proverb [mashal:H4912], and the interpretation; the words of the wise, and their dark sayings.”


And He Looked [ra`ah:H7200] On The Kenites [Qeyniy:H7017] 


We have encountered the term “and he looked” three times already in this series, as the following passages declare; we will also see it again in other places in Judges as well:


In Judges 1:24-25, this word is expressed as “saw,” and “when he shewed”: “And the spies saw [ra`ah:H7200] a man come forth out of the city, and they said unto him, Shew us, we pray thee, the entrance into the city, and we will shew thee mercy. {25} And when he shewed [ra`ah:H7200] them the entrance into the city, they smote the city with the edge of the sword; but they let go the man and all his family.”


Also in Judges 2:7, it is rendered as “who had seen”: “And the people served the LORD all the days of Joshua, and all the days of the elders that outlived Joshua, who had seen [ra`ah:H7200] all the great works of the LORD, that he did for Israel.”


In Judges 3:24, it translated as “and when they saw”: “When he [Ehud] was gone out, his servants came; and when they saw [ra`ah:H7200] that, behold, the doors of the parlour [were] locked, they said, Surely he [Eglon] covereth his [Eglon] feet in his [Eglon] summer chamber.


It looks like we’ll have to stop here today, even though we are in the middle of this very intriguing parable, which Balaam uttered, under divine inspiration. Lord willing, we will continue to examine the rest of this parable in our next study.




In verse 6, we do read a positive comment with regard to the Kenites and how they treated the Israelites historically, when they came out of Egypt, in 1 Sam 15:1-6, “Samuel also said unto Saul, The LORD sent me to anoint thee [to be] king over his people, over Israel: now therefore hearken thou unto the voice of the words of the LORD. {2} Thus saith the LORD of hosts, I remember [that] which Amalek did to Israel, how he laid [wait] for him in the way, when he came up from Egypt. {3} Now go and smite Amalek, and utterly destroy all that they have, and spare them not; but slay both man and woman, infant and suckling, ox and sheep, camel and ass. {4} And Saul gathered the people together, and numbered them in Telaim, two hundred thousand footmen, and ten thousand men of Judah. {5} And Saul came to a city of Amalek, and laid wait in the valley. {6} And Saul said unto the Kenites  [Qeyniy:H7017], Go, depart, get you down from among the Amalekites, lest I destroy you with them: for ye shewed kindness to all the children of Israel, when they came up out of Egypt. So the Kenites  [Qeyniy:H7017] departed from among the Amalekites.”