Bible Ministries International

Bible Ministries International

Bible Studies

A series of verse by verse studies by Gunther von Harringa Sr

Act 17:11 These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so.

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Hebrews 2 - Part 9

November 15, 2020


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 9, and today’s date is November 15, 2020. I’ll read Hebrews 2:5-9,


For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. {6} But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? {7} Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


We are still working on verse 6, and today we want to start by looking at the term, thou art mindful first in the Greek, and then in Hebrew, as the declaration ...What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? is a quotation taken from Psalm 8:4 which states: What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?


Thou Art Mindful [mimneskomai:G3403] Of Him [autos:G846]


This expression, thou art mindful or mimneskomai, and the pronoun, of him or autos only occur together in one other citation which is found in Hebrews 13:3, and they are translated as remember and yourselves:


Remember  [mimneskomai:G3403] them that are in bonds, as bound with them; [and] them which suffer adversity, as being yourselves [autos:G846] also in the body.


A Closer Look At Hebrews 13:3


There is an interesting parallelism that takes place in Hebrews 13:3 between two sets of terms: them that are in bonds and bound with them on the one hand; and on the other hand, [and] them which suffer adversity and as being yourselves also in the body. Let’s consider the first two phrases:


Them That Are In Bonds [desmios:G1198] 


This term is predominantly rendered as either prisoner or (be) in bonds, according to the other 15 citations in which this word is found. Here are a few examples:


Verse 15-16 of Matthew 27:15-26 records the release of a known criminal, Barabbas (“son of the father”) while the mob desired the Lord Jesus to be crucified. Spiritually, Barabbas represents all the elect who was guilty, and yet set free, while Jesus (without sin of His own) was condemned, even as Pilate stated in the 4th Gospel account ...I found no fault in Him…:    


Now at [that] feast the governor was wont to release unto the people a prisoner, [desmios:G1198] whom they would. {16} And they had then a notable prisoner, [desmios:G1198] called Barabbas. {17} Therefore when they were gathered together, Pilate said unto them, Whom will ye that I release unto you? Barabbas, or Jesus which is called Christ? {18} For he knew that for envy they had delivered him. {19} When he was set down on the judgment seat, his wife sent unto him, saying, Have thou nothing to do with that just man: for I have suffered many things this day in a dream because of him. {20} But the chief priests and elders persuaded the multitude that they should ask Barabbas, and destroy Jesus. {21} The governor answered and said unto them, Whether of the twain will ye that I release unto you? They said, Barabbas. {22} Pilate saith unto them, What shall I do then with Jesus which is called Christ? [They] all say unto him, Let him be crucified. {23} And the governor said, Why, what evil hath he done? But they cried out the more, saying, Let him be crucified. {24} When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, but [that] rather a tumult was made, he took water, and washed [his] hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person: see ye [to it]. {25} Then answered all the people, and said, His blood [be] on us, and on our children. {26} Then released he Barabbas unto them: and when he had scourged Jesus, he delivered [him] to be crucified.


Acts 28:16-17 speaks of Paul’s house arrest while in Rome: And when we came to Rome, the centurion delivered the prisoners [desmios:G1198] to the captain of the guard: but Paul was suffered to dwell by himself with a soldier that kept him.{17} And it came to pass, that after three days Paul called the chief of the Jews together: and when they were come together, he said unto them, Men [and] brethren, though I have committed nothing against the people, or customs of our fathers, yet was I delivered prisoner [desmios:G1198] from Jerusalem into the hands of the Romans.


Not only was Paul a prisoner in the literal sense in Rome as well as in Philippi in Ephesians 4:1 he admits to being the prisoner of the Lord spiritually: I therefore, the prisoner [desmios:G1198] of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called,


Bound With Them [syndeo:G4887]


The expression  bound with them in the phrase as bound with them only appears in Hebrews 13:3. It is a compound Greek verb made up of the preposition syn (G4862) or with and the main word which is another verb, deo (G1210) translated usually as bind, as these next references indicate:


Mark 15:7 offers this description of Barabbas:  And there was [one] named Barabbas, [which lay] bound [syndeo:G1210] with them that had made insurrection with him, who had committed murder in the insurrection.


Matthew 12:29 speaks of the bind[ing] of the strong man or Satan, in order for Christ to plunder his house (during the day of salvation) and set His elect free from Satan’s tyranny: Or else how can one enter into a strong man's house, and spoil his goods, except he first bind [syndeo:G1210] the strong man? and then he will spoil his house. 


In a similar sense the tares (the non-elect in the churches) were bound for judgment according to Matthew 13:30, Let both grow together until the harvest: and in the time of harvest I will say to the reapers, Gather ye together first the tares, and bind [syndeo:G1210] them in bundles to burn them: but gather the wheat into my barn.


So the two terms, them that are in bonds and bound with them  in this admonition in Hebrews 13:3 highlights the principle of bearing one another’s burdens as we read both in Galatians 6:2 as well as in 1 Corinthians 12:25-26 respectively:  


 Bear ye one another's burdens, and so fulfil the law of Christ.


That there should be no schism in the body; but [that] the members should have the same care one for another. {26} And whether one member suffer, all the members suffer with it; or one member be honoured, all the members rejoice with it.


The next two parallel passages are: [and] them which suffer adversity along with as being yourselves also in the body. 


Them Which Suffer Adversity [kakoucheo:G2558] 


This word only emerges again in verse 37 of Hebrews 11:35-38 concerning the heroes of faith, in which it is rendered as tormented, underscoring the principle of ...the fellowship of His sufferings... that Paul alludes to under divine inspiration (in Philippians 3:10):


Women received their dead raised to life again: and others were tortured, not accepting deliverance; that they might obtain a better resurrection: {36} And others had trial of [cruel] mockings and scourgings, yea, moreover of bonds and imprisonment:{37} They were stoned, they were sawn asunder, were tempted, were slain with the sword: they wandered about in sheepskins and goatskins; being destitute, afflicted, tormented; [kakoucheo:G2558] {38} (Of whom the world was not worthy:) they wandered in deserts, and [in] mountains, and [in] dens and caves of the earth.


The next parallel phrase that is compared to them which suffer adversity is as being yourselves also in the body. These six terms can be broken down into two groupings:


  • ...as being yourselves...
  • ...also in the body. 


As [hos:G5613] Being [on:G5607] Yourselves [autos:G846]


These three words are found in three other citations:


Luke 3:23 likewise renders these as: himself, being, and as: And Jesus himself [autos:G846] began to be about thirty years of age, being [on:G5607] (as [hos:G5613] was supposed ) the son of Joseph, which was [the son] of Heli,


1 Corinthians 8:7 translates these as, their, and being: Howbeit [there is] not in every man that knowledge: for some with conscience of the idol unto this hour eat [it] as [hos:G5613] a thing offered unto an idol; and their [autos:G846] conscience being [on:G5607] weak [asthenes:G722] is defiled.


Hebrews 3:2 expresses these words in this way: Who was faithful to him [autos:G846] that appointed him, as [hos:G5613] also Moses [was faithful] in all his [autos:G846] house.


In the foregoing Scriptures we see a comparison between Moses (who is a great type of Christ and the Law) and Christ Himself Who humbled himself in the Incarnation as well as in the demonstration of the Atonement as we read in both Philippians 2:8 as well as in Hebrews 5:7-8 respectively:


And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross.

Who in the days of his flesh, when he had offered up prayers and supplications with strong crying and tears unto him that was able to save him from death, and was heard in that he feared; {8} Though he were a Son, yet learned he obedience by the things which he suffered;


In 1 Corinthians 8:7 we encounter the expression, weak which literally means without strength or asthenes (G772). This same word is used as weak referring to the flesh in Matthew 26:41,


Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation: the spirit indeed [is] willing, but the flesh [is] weak.[asthenes:G772]


Also [kai:G2532] In [en:G1722] The Body [soma:G4983]


Let’s now consider the three Greek terms also in the body, and how God employs them and especially as they relate to the preceding three words, as being yourselves, having to do with both humility and weakness:


2 Corinthians 4:10 declares this about God’s elect today who as Christ’s body on earth are manifesting His sufferings in the same manner as He did while on earth: Always bearing about in [en:G1722]  the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also [kai:G2532] of Jesus might be made manifest in [en:G1722]  our body. [soma:G4983]



Paul, who is representative of both the Lord as well as the child of God makes this statement in Colossians 1:24, Who now rejoice in [en:G1722]  my sufferings for you, and [kai:G2532] fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ in [en:G1722]  my flesh for his body's [soma:G4983]

 sake, which is the church:


Paul, under divine inspiration in Philippians 1:20, sums up the essence of the Christian life: According to my earnest expectation and [my] hope, that in [en:G1722]  nothing I shall be ashamed, but [that] with all boldness, as [kai:G2532] always, [so] now also Christ shall be magnified in [en:G1722]  my body [soma:G4983], whether [it be] by life, or by death.


And in Romans 8:23 the weakness of an unsaved body is contrasted with the glorious hope of being clothed with an eternal body that is perfect and holy: 


And not only [they], but ourselves also [kai:G2532], which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even [kai:G2532] we ourselves groan within [en:G1722]  ourselves, waiting for the adoption, [to wit], the redemption of our body. [soma:G4983]


Remember [mnaomai:G3415]


The root word for the Greek verb thou art mindful or mimneskomai,  is another Greek verb, mnaomai (G3415). The following examples illustrate some of the ways that God utilizes this word, which is primarily translated as some form of the term remember:


Luke 1:54 and 72 maintain: He hath holpen his servant Israel, in remembrance [mnaomai:G3415] of [his] mercy;...  {72} To perform the mercy [promised] to our fathers, and to remember [mnaomai:G3415] his holy covenant;


These two verses are quoting Psalm 98:3 and Psalm 105:8-10 respectively:


He hath remembered his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.


He hath remembered his covenant for ever, the word [which] he commanded to a thousand generations. {9} Which [covenant] he made with Abraham, and his oath unto Isaac; {10} And confirmed the same unto Jacob for a law, [and] to Israel [for] an everlasting covenant:


This same Greek word mnaomai  is found in verse 42 of  Luke 23:39-46 as remember regarding the plea of the thief on the Cross at Jesus’ right hand: And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him, saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us. {40} But the other answering rebuked him, saying, Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation? {41} And we indeed justly; for we receive the due reward of our deeds: but this man hath done nothing amiss. {42} And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember [mnaomai:G3415] me when thou comest into thy kingdom. {43} And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. {44} And it was about the sixth hour, and there was a darkness over all the earth until the ninth hour. {45} And the sun was darkened, and the veil of the temple was rent in the midst. {46} And when Jesus had cried with a loud voice, he said, Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit: and having said thus, he gave up the ghost.


Verse 16 of John 12:12-16 records this as remembered they as verse 15 is quoting Zachariah 9:9,  On the next day much people that were come to the feast, when they heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem, {13} Took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed [is] the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord. {14} And Jesus, when he had found a young ass, sat thereon; as it is written, {15} Fear not, daughter of Sion: behold, thy King cometh, sitting on an ass's colt. {16} These things understood not his disciples at the first: but when Jesus was glorified, then remembered they [mnaomai:G3415] that these things were written of him, and [that] they had done these things unto him.


Zechariah 9:9 foretells of this very incident 500 or so years before it even took place with great accuracy, as only God can:


Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he [is] just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass. 


The context surrounding verse 12 of Hebrews 8:10-12 involves God finding fault with His two divine organisms - Israel and Judah (Whom He was married to) and who they typify, namely the end-time institutional churches and denominations; verse 11 can only be speaking of the salvation of all of God’s elect, which marked the end of the Great Commission (according to Matthew 24:14):  


For this [is] the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, saith the Lord; I will put my laws into their mind, and write them in their hearts: and I will be to them a God, and they shall be to me a people: {11} And they shall not teach every man his neighbour, and every man his brother, saying, Know the Lord: for all shall know me, from the least to the greatest. {12} For I will be merciful to their unrighteousness, and their sins and their iniquities will I remember [mnaomai:G3415] no more.


Hebrews 10:17 affirms the same reality as Hebrews 8:12 regarding the forgiveness of sin: And their sins and iniquities will I remember [mnaomai:G3415] no more.


When we were going through the book of 2 Peter we noted that this theme of remembrance was an essential component that God used in the spiritual life and growth of the child of God, as one discovers in 2 Peter 3:2, in which this same word, mnaomai is included: That ye may be mindful [mnaomai:G3415] of the words which were spoken before by the holy prophets, and of the commandment of us the apostles of the Lord and Saviour:


In similar fashion, Jude 1:17 reinforces this truth of remembering the words of Scripture: But, beloved, remember [mnaomai:G3415] ye the words which were spoken before of the apostles of our Lord Jesus Christ;


By contrast, Revelation 16:19 presents a remembrance of a different sort - one having to do with remembering sin, and executing the penalty for that sin, which is death and annihilation, and in this case includes the entire world which is under God’s judgment:  


And the great city was divided into three parts, and the cities of the nations fell: and great Babylon came in remembrance [mnaomai:G3415]  before God, to give unto her the cup of the wine of the fierceness of his wrath.


Let’s stop here as we won’t have enough time to address the term Thou art mindful in Psalm 8:4 until our next study, Lord willing.

 Hebrews 2 - Part 10

  November 22, 2020


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 10, and today’s date is November 22, 2020. I’ll read Hebrews 2:5-9,


For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. {6} But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? {7} Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


You might recall that in our last study we focused on the phrase in Hebrews 2:6 thou art mindful of him, which is made up of two words, thou art mindful [mimneskomai:G3403] and of him [autos:G846].  It was noted that these two expressions only occur together in Hebrews 13:3, and for that reason we spent some time looking carefully at that one verse. Since thou art mindful or mimneskomai is only found in Hebrews 2:6 and Hebrews 13:3 we expanded our search to the root word for thou are mindful or mimneskomai, with the hope of uncovering more information about its meaning. 


Whenever you run across a word that is only used once or twice it is always helpful to examine its parent or root word to ses if God will reveal further insight or clarification.


In this case the root word for mimneskomai is the verb, mnaomai (G3415) [even though mimneskomai, or thou art mindful is also a verb]. We also considered a number of passages in which this expression, mnaomai (G3415)  was utilized; it is translated as some form of the word, remember. In fact, two such passages in which this word appears are Luke 1:54 and 72, which record the words under divine inspiration of Mary (Jesus’ earthly mother), as well as those of Zacharias (John the Baptist’s father):


He hath holpen his servant Israel, in remembrance [mnaomai:G3415] of [his] mercy;...  {72} To perform the mercy [promised] to our fathers, and to remember [mnaomai:G3415] his holy covenant;


I mentioned last Sunday that these two verses are quoting Psalm 98:3 and Psalm 105:8-10 respectively:


He hath remembered [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] his mercy and his truth toward the house of Israel: all the ends of the earth have seen the salvation of our God.


He hath remembered [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] his covenant for ever, the word [which] he commanded to a thousand generations. {9} Which [covenant] he made with Abraham, and his oath unto Isaac; {10} And confirmed the same unto Jacob for a law, [and] to Israel [for] an everlasting covenant:


This same word, he hath remembered or zakar (H2142) in Psalm 98:3 and Psalm 105:8 crops up in Psalm 8:4,


What is man, that thou art mindful [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?






*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament




Thou Art Mindful [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] זָכַר


Zakar (H2142)  is a primary word, from which there are six other derivatives (we will only consider four of them), all of which form a “cluster” or “family” of roots, which are made up of consonants, since Hebrew is a consonantal language. The three letters that make up this word in Hebrew (reading from right to left) are: Zain/Caph/Resh. (The 7th, 11th, and 20th letters respectively of the Hebrew alphabet) I mention these letters as the other derivatives are identically spelled, as we will discover.  Curiously these derivatives also include the name Zechariah [which is a compound word signifying Jehovah (or Jah) remembers], of which there are some 20 or so men by this name in the Bible.  Zakar (H2142) is found over 223 times, and is also rendered as remember, remembrance, and mindful; additionally and to a lesser degree it is also translated as record (or recorder), mention, think, and in numerous other miscellaneous ways as the following passages illustrate:


By the way, and just to be very clear, BMI is not attempting to teach Hebrew or Greek as a spoken language. What we are endeavoring to do is to discover the spiritual meaning of the Hebrew/Aramaic/Greek letters that make up these inspired words in the original languages. Unlike any other language on earth, the letters of the words in the Bible contain spiritual significance. The letters are just as holy as the words they constitute as they are actually “letter words.” A quick example is the second Hebrew letter, Beth, which is also the word for house, such as Beth - lehem, or “house of Bread.” Furthermore each letter is connected usually to two other letters, and their individual spiritual relevance impacts one another to reveal even more spiritual truth.   


In spite of man’s rebellion in the Garden of Eden, and God’s subsequent judgment to destroy mankind by means of a worldwide flood (with the exception of Noah and his family) Genesis 9:15-16 records God’s promise to the human race to never destroy the earth again by a Flood: 


And I will remember [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] my covenant, which [is] between me and you and every living creature of all flesh; and the waters shall no more become a flood to destroy all flesh.{16} And the bow shall be in the cloud; and I will look upon it, that I may remember [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] the everlasting covenant between God and every living creature of all flesh that [is] upon the earth.


Genesis 40:14 and 23 expresses Joseph’s plea to the chief baker to tell Pharaoh of his plight, in which this term is translated as think, me and make mention, and remember:  But think [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] on me when it shall be well with thee, and shew kindness, I pray thee, unto me, and make mention [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] of me unto Pharaoh, and bring me out of this house: ... {23} Yet did not the chief butler remember [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] Joseph, but forgat him.


However in Genesis 42:9 it is Joseph who remembers the dreams he had of his brothers who appear in his presence to ask for food to take back to Canaan because of the severe famine, and do not recognize him as their long lost brother:


And Joseph remembered [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] the dreams which he dreamed of them, and said unto them, Ye [are] spies; to see the nakedness of the land ye are come.


Frequently passages such as Leviticus 26:42 emerge, in which God remembers His Gospel promise to the patriarchs; notice how this word is repeated three times in this one verse pointing to the purpose of God: 


Then will I remember [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] my covenant with Jacob, and also my covenant with Isaac, and also my covenant with Abraham will I remember;[zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] and I will remember [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] the land.


On the other hand 1 Samuel 4:18 presents a different portrayal - one of judgment - falling upon the end-time institutional churches and denominations typified by the historical parable of Eli and his two wicked sons found in 1 Samuel, chapters 2-4 


And it came to pass, when he made mention [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] of the ark of God, that he fell from off the seat backward by the side of the gate, and his neck break, and he died: for he was an old man, and heavy. And he had judged Israel forty years.


1 Chronicles 16:4, 12 and 15 reveal how God employs this word in connection with the return of the Ark of the Covenant to the city of David in the words of this Psalm. Please note the idea of recounting and remembering God’s marvelous works as well as His covenant or Gospel on behalf of His chosen elect, which is an important aspect associated with this word. These terms are rendered as and to record, remember, and be ye mindful:  


And he appointed [certain] of the Levites to minister before the ark of the LORD, and to record [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551, and to thank and praise the LORD God of Israel: … {12} Remember [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] his marvellous works that he hath done, his wonders, and the judgments of his mouth; {15} Be ye mindful [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] always of his covenant; the word [which] he commanded to a thousand generations;


Verse 18 of Job 28:12-20 includes this expression as mention: But where shall wisdom be found? and where [is] the place of understanding? {13} Man knoweth not the price thereof; neither is it found in the land of the living. {14} The depth saith, It [is] not in me: and the sea saith, [It is] not with me. {15} It cannot be gotten for gold, neither shall silver be weighed [for] the price thereof. {16} It cannot be valued with the gold of Ophir, with the precious onyx, or the sapphire. {17} The gold and the crystal cannot equal it: and the exchange of it [shall not be for] jewels of fine gold. {18} No mention [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] shall be made of coral, or of pearls: for the price of wisdom [is] above rubies. {19} The topaz of Ethiopia shall not equal it, neither shall it be valued with pure gold. {20} Whence then cometh wisdom? and where [is] the place of understanding?


Curiously, verse 3 of Isaiah 66:1-6 presents this as he that burneth: Thus saith the LORD, The heaven [is] my throne, and the earth [is] my footstool: where [is] the house that ye build unto me? and where [is] the place of my rest? {2} For all those [things] hath mine hand made, and all those [things] have been, saith the LORD: but to this [man] will I look, [even] to [him that is] poor and of a contrite spirit, and trembles at my word. {3} He that killeth an ox [is as if] he slew a man; he that sacrificed a lamb, [as if] he cut off a dog's neck; he that offereth an oblation, [as if he offered] swine's blood; he that burneth [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] incense, [as if] he blessed an idol. Yea, they have chosen their own ways, and their soul delighteth in their abominations.  {4} I also will choose their delusions, and will bring their fears upon them; because when I called, none did answer; when I spake, they did not hear: but they did evil before mine eyes, and chose [that] in which I delighted not. {5}  Hear the word of the LORD, ye that tremble at his word; Your brethren that hated you, that cast you out for my name's sake, said, Let the LORD be glorified: but he shall appear to your joy, and they shall be ashamed. {6} A voice of noise from the city, a voice from the temple, a voice of the LORD that rendered recompense to his enemies.


Now we can examine one of the derivatives of this word, [zakar:H2142/TWOT:551] זָכַר, which is:


Remembrance [zeker:H2143/TWOT: 551a] זֵכֶר


Zeker is predominantly translated as remembrance, memorial, memory, and curiously scent as the following passages affirm. The three letters that make up this word in Hebrew (reading from right to left) are identical to thou art mindful, or , comprised of:  Zain/Caph/Resh. (The 7th, 11th, and 20th letters respectively of the Hebrew alphabet.)


Exodus 17:14 declares: And the LORD said unto Moses, Write this [for] a memorial in a book, and rehearse [it] in the ears of Joshua: for I will utterly put out the remembrance [zeker:H2143/TWOT: 551a] of Amalek from under heaven.


Psalm 135:13 extols, Thy name, O LORD, [endureth] for ever; [and] thy memorial [zeker:H2143/TWOT: 551a], O LORD, throughout all generations.


Ecclesiastes 9:5 records: For the living know that they shall die: but the dead know not any thing, neither have they any more a reward; for the memory [zeker:H2143/TWOT: 551a] of them is forgotten.


Isaiah 26:8 acknowledges: Yea, in the way of thy judgments, O LORD, have we waited for thee; the desire of [our] soul [is] to thy name, and to the remembrance [zeker:H2143/TWOT: 551a] of thee.


Hosea 14:7 declares: They that dwell under his shadow shall return; they shall revive [as] the corn, and grow as the vine: the scent [zeker:H2143/TWOT: 551a] thereof [shall be] as the wine of Lebanon.


Male [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e] 


The next derivative is  zakar, and it is also spelled identically as the other two terms and primarily rendered as male, man, child, mankind, and him according to these next citations:


Genesis 1:27 records: So God created man in his [own] image, in the image of God created he him; male [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e] and female created he them.


Genesis 6:19 also stipulates the gender of the animals and birds that were to be brought aboard the Ark: And of every living thing of all flesh, two of every [sort] shalt thou bring into the ark, to keep [them] alive with thee; they shall be male [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e] and female.


Genesis 17:12, 14, and 23 were some of the laws that God ordained with regard to circumcision: And he that is eight days old shall be circumcised among you, every man child [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e]  in your generations, he that is born in the house, or bought with money of any stranger, which [is] not of thy seed. ... {14} And the uncircumcised man child [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e] whose flesh of his foreskin is not circumcised, that soul shall be cut off from his people; he hath broken my covenant. ... {23} And Abraham took Ishmael his son, and all that were born in his house, and all that were bought with his money, every male [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e] among the men of Abraham's house; and circumcised the flesh of their foreskin in the selfsame day, as God had said unto him.


Verse 7 of Leviticus 12:1-8 are the ordinances regarding ceremonial cleansing of a woman who had given birth to a male or female baby:  


And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, {2} Speak unto the children of Israel, saying, If a woman have conceived seed, and born a man child: then she shall be unclean seven days; according to the days of the separation for her infirmity shall she be unclean. {3} And in the eighth day the flesh of his foreskin shall be circumcised. {4} And she shall then continue in the blood of her purifying three and thirty days; she shall touch no hallowed thing, nor come into the sanctuary, until the days of her purifying be fulfilled. {5} But if she bear a maid child, then she shall be unclean two weeks, as in her separation: and she shall continue in the blood of her purifying threescore and six days. {6} And when the days of her purifying are fulfilled, for a son, or for a daughter, she shall bring a lamb of the first year for a burnt offering, and a young pigeon, or a turtledove, for a sin offering, unto the door of the tabernacle of the congregation, unto the priest: {7} Who shall offer it before the LORD, and make an atonement for her; and she shall be cleansed from the issue of her blood. This [is] the law for her that hath born a male [zakar:H2145/TWOT:551e] or a female. {8} And if she be not able to bring a lamb, then she shall bring two turtles, or two young pigeons; the one for the burnt offering, and the other for a sin offering: and the priest shall make an atonement for her, and she shall be clean.



We see this law put into action with respect to Mary and the Lord Jesus in Luke 2:22-24,


And when the days of her purification according to the law of Moses were accomplished, they brought him to Jerusalem, to present [him] to the Lord; {23} (As it is written in the law of the Lord, Every male that openeth the womb shall be called holy to the Lord;) {24} And to offer a sacrifice according to that which is said in the law of the Lord, A pair of turtledoves, or two young pigeons.


Memorial [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b]  זִכָּרוֹן


The last derivative that we want to consider today is identically spelled as far as the first three letters are concerned just like all the other words we have discussed today, except for the addition of two letters at the end - a Vau, and a Nun (the 11th and 14th letters respectively). Keep in mind that the same three letters of a word indicate that it belongs to the same “cluster” or “family” of roots. This term is expressed in the main as a memorial, and to a lesser extent as remembrance and records as the subsequent references acknowledge:


Exodus 28:12 and 29 maintain: And thou shalt put the two stones upon the shoulders of the ephod [for] stones of memorial [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b]  unto the children of Israel: and Aaron shall bear their names before the LORD upon his two shoulders for a memorial. [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b]  ... {29} And Aaron shall bear the names of the children of Israel in the breastplate of judgment upon his heart, when he goeth in unto the holy [place], for a memorial [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b] before the LORD continually.


However in Esther 6:1 it occurs as : On that night could not the king sleep, and he commanded to bring the book of records [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b] of the chronicles; and they were read before the king.


Ecclesiastes 1:11 also teaches:  [There is] no remembrance [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b]  of former [things]; neither shall there be [any] remembrance [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b] of [things] that are to come with [those] that shall come after.


Last but certainly not least, Malachi 3:16 beautifully asserts: Then they that feared the LORD spake often one to another: and the LORD hearkened, and heard [it], and a book of remembrance [zikrown:H2146/TWOT:551b] was written before him for them that feared the LORD, and that thought upon his name.


I trust that you were able to pick up some of the subtle differences in each of these expressions having to do with:


  • God remembering with regards to mercy or judgment 
  • God’s elect remembering, rehearsing, and being obedient to God’s commands.
  • God’s corporate people not remembering, but rather forgetting and despising God’s Word.


Lord willing, in our next study we will continue our examination of the rest of  Hebrews 2:6. Please stay tuned for our remaining hymns.

Hebrews 2 - Part 11

January 17, 2021


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 11, and today’s date is January 17, 2021. I’ll read Hebrews 2:5-9,


For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. {6} But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? {7} Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


We have arrived at the latter part of verse 6, and you might recall that verse 6 is a quotation taken from Psalm 8:4 which states:


What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?


Thus far in verse 6 we have been examining each of the Greek words first and then the corresponding Hebrew terms, so let’s continue with that format as we consider the term Son of man.


By and large this title which consists of two Greek words, Son and of man is referring to the Lord Jesus Christ Who is the perfect union of Eternal God and Sinless Man, as John 1:14 testifies:


And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth.


Son [huios:G5207] Of Man [anthropos:G444]  


Verse 13 of John 3:13-14 is one of the greatest affirmations of the deity of the Savior, encompassing His Atonement at the foundation of the world (His “descension”) followed by His “ascension,” while concurrently residing in Heaven. Verse 14 also alludes to the demonstration of the Resurrection in 33 AD (mirroring His “ascension” at the foundation of the world) to sit at the Father’s right hand (according to Psalm 110:1)  


And no man hath ascended up [anabaino:G305] to heaven, but he that came down [katabaino:G2597] from heaven, [even] the Son [huios:G5207]  of man [anthropos:G444]  which is in heaven. {14} And as Moses lifted up [hupsoo:G5312]  the serpent in the wilderness, even so must the Son [huios:G5207] of man [anthropos:G444] be lifted up: [hupsoo:G5312]  


The following citations contain these two terms as well, and please note the recurring theme of “ascension” and “descension”:


John 1:51 accentuates this truth as well: And he saith unto him, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Hereafter ye shall see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending [anabaino:G305] and descending [katabaino:G2597] upon the Son [huios:G5207] of man. [anthropos:G444] 


John 6:62 poses this question: [What] and if ye shall see the Son [huios:G5207] of man [anthropos:G444] 

 ascend up [anabaino:G305] where he was before?


And John 8:28 further adds: Then said Jesus unto them, When ye have lifted up [hupsoo:G5312] the Son [huios:G5207] of man [anthropos:G444], then shall ye know that I am [he], and [that] I do nothing of myself; but as my Father hath taught me, I speak these things.


John 12:23-34 likewise asserts:  And Jesus answered them, saying, The hour is come, that the Son [huios:G5207] of man [anthropos:G444] should be glorified. {24} Verily, verily, I say unto you, Except a corn of wheat fall into the ground and die, it abideth alone: but if it die, it bringeth forth much fruit. {25} He that loveth his life shall lose it; and he that hateth his life in this world shall keep it unto life eternal. {26} If any man serve me, let him follow me; and where I am, there shall also my servant be: if any man serve me, him will [my] Father honour. {27} Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour. {28} Father, glorify thy name. Then came there a voice from heaven, [saying], I have both glorified [it], and will glorify [it] again. {29} The people therefore, that stood by, and heard [it], said that it thundered: others said, An angel spake to him. {30} Jesus answered and said, This voice came not because of me, but for your sakes. {31} Now is the judgment of this world: now shall the prince of this world be cast out. {32} And I, if I be lifted up [hupsoo:G5312]  from the earth, will draw all [men] unto me. {33}  This he said, signifying what death he should die. {34} The people answered him, We have heard out of the law that Christ abideth for ever: and how sayest thou, The Son [huios:G5207] of man [anthropos:G444] must be lifted up? [hupsoo:G5312] who is this Son [huios:G5207] of man? [anthropos:G444] 


Lastly, 1 John 5:9 contrasts the witness of men with the superiority of the witness of God that surrounds the Person and Work of the Messiah: If we receive the witness of men [anthropos:G444], the witness of God is greater: for this is the witness of God which he hath testified of his Son. [huios:G5207] 


Let’s now turn attention to the equivalent  Hebrew expression in Psalm 8:4, of him and the son along with of man.


Of Him And The Son [ben:H1121/TWOT:254] Of Man [`adam:H120/TWOT:25a]


The following examples illustrate how God uses these two Hebrew words that identify with the Lord Jesus Christ - the Son of Man; quite often these terms are rendered sons of men or children of men: 


Numbers 23:19 records: God [is] not a man, that he should lie; neither the son [ben:H1121/TWOT:254*] of man [`adam:H120/TWOT:25a*], that he should repent: hath he said, and shall he not do [it]? or hath he spoken, and shall he not make it good?


In the spiritual context that Christ became a worm in the Atonement at the foundation of the world, verse 6 of Job 25:4-6 includes these two terms; remember those New Testament passages that speak of the worm dieth not? (Mark 9:44, 46, 48): 


How then can man be justified with God? or how can he be clean [that is] born of a woman? {5} Behold even to the moon, and it shineth not; yea, the stars are not pure in his sight. {6} How much less man, [that is] a worm? and the son [ben:H1121/TWOT:254] of man [`adam:H120/TWOT:25a], [which is] a worm?


Psalm 80:17 affirms: Let thy hand be upon the man of thy right hand, upon the son [ben:H1121/TWOT:254] of man [`adam:H120/TWOT:25a] [whom] thou madest strong for thyself.


Curiously, this expression Son of Man is found over 60 times in the book of Ezekiel alone as God addresses him by this title, and in doing, he typifies the Lord Jesus Christ, as Ezekiel 44:5 declares for instance:  


And the LORD said unto me, Son [ben:H1121/TWOT:254] of man, mark well, and behold with thine eyes, and hear with thine ears all that I say unto thee concerning all the ordinances of the house of the LORD, and all the laws thereof; and mark well the entering in of the house, with every going forth of the sanctuary.



*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament



Daniel 8:17 and 10:16 similarly maintain: So he came near where I stood: and when he came, I was afraid, and fell upon my face: but he said unto me, Understand, O son [ben:H1121/TWOT:254] of man [`adam:H120/TWOT:25a]: for at the time of the end [shall be] the vision…{10:16} And, behold, [one] like the similitude of the sons [ben:H1121/TWOT:254] of men [`adam:H120/TWOT:25a] touched my lips: then I opened my mouth, and spake, and said unto him that stood before me, O my lord, by the vision my sorrows are turned upon me, and I have retained no strength.


Next we want to proceed to the last few words in Hebrews 2:6, that thou visitest him.


That [hoti:G3754] Thou Visitest [episkeptomai:G1980] Him [autos:G846] 


These three Greek words only surface together again in Luke 1:68 and Luke 7:18 respectively, in connection with redemption and healing; the latter  represents spiritual healing or salvation.


Luke 1:68 translates these words for he hath visited...his: Blessed [be] the Lord God of Israel; for [hoti:G3754] he hath visited [episkeptomai:G1980]  and redeemed his [autos:G846] people,


Verse 16 of Luke 7:11-16 renders these terms as that... has visited his in this account of the raising of the dead son of the widow of Nain: 


And it came to pass the day after, that he went into a city called Nain; and many of his disciples went with him, and much people. {12} Now when he came nigh to the gate of the city, behold, there was a dead man carried out, the only son of his mother, and she was a widow: and much people of the city was with her. {13} And when the Lord saw her, he had compassion on her, and said unto her, Weep not. {14} And he came and touched the bier: and they that bare [him] stood still. And he said, Young man, I say unto thee, Arise. {15} And he that was dead sat up, and began to speak. And he delivered him to his mother. {16} And there came a fear on all: and they glorified God, saying, That a great prophet is risen up among us; and, That [hoti:G3754]God hath visited [episkeptomai:G1980] his [autos:G846] people.


Let’s now look at the last few words in Psalm 8:4, that thou visitest him.


Thou Visitest [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] Him 


This phrase consists of the main Hebrew word, thou visitest or paqad. This word is rendered in the following ways from greatest to least insofar as the number of occurrences:  number, visit, punish, appoint, commit, miss, set, charge, governor, lack, oversight, officers, counted, empty, ruler, overseer, judgment, as well as 23 other miscellaneous ways, so you can see it is pregnant with so many varied meanings, as these next citations illustrate. One of the main ways that this word is used is in connection to numbering - numbering priests or soldiers, etc.


Verse 1 of Genesis 21:1-2 records the fulfillment of God’s promise to Sarah and Abraham, in which the word visited is employed once again: And the LORD visited [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802]  Sarah as he had said, and the LORD did unto Sarah as he had spoken. {2} For Sarah conceived, and bare Abraham a son in his old age, at the set time of which God had spoken to him.


However in Genesis 39:5 it is translated as [that] he [Potiphar] had made him overseer, referring to Joseph: And it came to pass from the time [that] he had made him overseer [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] in his house, and over all that he had, that the LORD blessed the Egyptian's house for Joseph's sake; and the blessing of the LORD was upon all that he had in the house, and in the field.


Genesis 41:34 recounts Joseph’s advice to Pharaoh, in which this is expressed as, [this], and let him appoint: Let Pharaoh do [this], and let him appoint [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] officers over the land, and take up the fifth part of the land of Egypt in the seven plenteous years.


In Genesis 50:24-25 this word appears twice as will surely and visit (which is a doubling of this word): And Joseph said unto his brethren, I die: and God will surely [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] visit [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] you, and bring you out of this land unto the land which he sware to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob. {25} And Joseph took an oath of the children of Israel, saying, God will surely [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] visit [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] you, and ye shall carry up my bones from hence.


We see this same doubling in Exodus 3:16 as God records His words to Moses: Go, and gather the elders of Israel together, and say unto them, The LORD God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, of Isaac, and of Jacob, appeared unto me, saying, I have surely [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802]  visited [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] you, and [seen] that which is done to you in Egypt:


Amo 3:2 and 14 translate these words as punish and visit: You only have I known of all the families of the earth: therefore I will punish [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] you for all your iniquities. ... {14} That in the day that I shall visit [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] the transgressions of Israel upon him I will also visit [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802]  the altars of Bethel: and the horns of the altar shall be cut off, and fall to the ground.


However in Isaiah 27:3, this expression is rendered as any hurt: I the LORD do keep it; I will water it every moment: lest [any] hurt [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] it, I will keep it night and day.


In Isaiah 34:16 it crops up as shall want:  Seek ye out of the book of the LORD, and read: no one of these shall fail, none shall want [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] her mate: for my mouth it hath commanded, and his spirit it hath gathered them.


In Jeremiah 51:47 it emerges as that I will do judgment - a reference to our current day of judgment: Therefore, behold, the days come, that I will do judgment [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] upon the graven images of Babylon: and her whole land shall be confounded, and all her slain shall fall in the midst of her.


Numbers 3:16 declares: And Moses numbered [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802]  them according to the word of the LORD, as he was commanded.


Numbers 31:48 expresses this word as and the officers:  And the officers [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] which [were] over thousands [’eleph:H505/TWOT:109a] of the host, the captains of thousands [’eleph:H505/TWOT:109a], and captains of hundreds, came near unto Moses:


By the way, the two terms, over thousands and of thousands is the ’eleph shoresh or root  - אֶלֶף - (reading from right to left), consisting of the letters Aleph/Lamed/Pe (the 1st, 12th, and 17th letters respectively of the Hebrew alphabet) and is the “LETTER-WORD” signifying: Chief, Governor, or as the numeral 1000, as it is employed here in Numbers 31:48.


Verse 2 of 1 Samuel 15:1-3 translates this word as I remember, in this charge that God gave to King Saul in verse 3 which he failed to carry out (keeping in mind that he exemplifies the New Testament churches and denominations that came under God’s wrath for the same reason):  Thus saith the LORD of hosts, I remember [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] [that] which Amalek did to Israel, how he laid [wait] for him in the way, when he came up from Egypt. {2} Thus saith the LORD of hosts, I remember [that] which Amalek did to Israel, how he laid [wait] for him in the way, when he came up from Egypt. {3} Now go and smite Amalek, and utterly destroy all that they have, and spare them not; but slay both man and woman, infant and suckling, ox and sheep, camel and ass.


In 1 Samuel 17:18 this is expressed as and look as David by contrast to King Saul (even as young man) obeys his father’s instruction: And carry these ten cheeses unto the captain of [their] thousand [’eleph:H505/TWOT:109a], and look [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] how thy brethren fare, and take their pledge.


Once again we see the ’eleph shoresh or root, of [their] thousand. 


In 1 Samuel 20:18 the two words, thou shalt be missed and will be empty are utilized: Then Jonathan said to David, To morrow [is] the new moon: and thou shalt be missed [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802], because thy seat will be empty. [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802]


Last, but certainly not least, we encounter the term, I commit in Psalm 31:5, which is a Messianic psalm, in which we find the fulfillment of this passage as Jesus voluntarily gave up the Spirit in the demonstration on the Cross (pointing to the atonement at the foundation of the world):  


Into thine hand I commit [paqad:H6485/TWOT:1802] my spirit: thou hast redeemed me, O LORD God of truth.


Well on that solemn note, we have to end today’s study. Lord willing in our next lesson we will move on to Hebrews 2:7 (quoting Psalm 8:5) which declares: Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands:


Stay tuned now for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.

Hebrews 2 - Part 12

January 24, 2021


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 12, and today’s date is January 24, 2021. I’ll read Hebrews 2:5-9,


For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. {6} But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? {7} Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


Today we want to address verse 7, which as I mentioned at the close of last Sunday’s study is a quotation taken from Psalm 8:5 which declares:


For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.


Let’s begin by considering Hebrews 2:7, and then if we have enough time, we might be able to start with Psalm 8:5.


Thou Madest [elattoo:G1642] Him [autos:G846] A Little [brachus:G1024] Lower [elattoo:G1642]


The phrase, Thou madest him a little lower is made up of three terms, thou madest lower  or elattoo, him or autos, and a little, or brachus


I would like to point something out with regard to this first word, thou madest lower, which “appears” twice, however that is not the case. It is simply that the other words, him and a little are separating this one word, thou madest lower. You will see this occurrence quite often in Greek, however this is not the case in Hebrew, as we will learn when we investigate Psalm 8:5, 


Thou Madest Lower [elattoo:G1642] 

This expression, thou madest lower is only found in two other verses, one of which is in verse 9 of this same chapter, in which God is making another contrast between the Lord Jesus and the created angels, as was noted so frequently in chapter one:


But we see Jesus, who was made [elattoo:G1642] a little lower [elattoo:G1642] than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


The second passage is John 3:30, concerning the truth that John the Baptist  uttered, which highlights what each child of God earnestly desires; this term is rendered [must] decrease: He must increase, but I [must] decrease. [elattoo:G1642]


Him [autos:G846] 


The pronoun translated him is employed very often in Greek, over 5700 hundred times. What’s noteworthy about this example is that it is used three times in verse 7, exemplifying the exalted Person of God the Son, which is being emphasized in Hebrews 2:7, as opposed to mankind as the highest creation of God which will come into view in Psalm 2:8. 


A Little [brachus:G1024] 


This expression a little, surfaces in five other citations, besides Hebrews 2:7 and 9:


Luke 22:58 expresses this word as a little while: And after a little while [brachus:G1024] another saw him, and said, Thou art also of them. And Peter said, Man, I am not.


And John 6:7 renders it as little:  Philip answered him, Two hundred pennyworth of bread is not sufficient for them, that every one of them may take a little. [brachus:G1024]


Act 5:34 translates it as little space: Then stood there up one in the council, a Pharisee, named Gamaliel, a doctor of the law, had in reputation among all the people, and commanded to put the apostles forth a little space; [brachus:G1024]


However in Hebrews 13:22, it crops up as few words: And I beseech you, brethren, suffer the word of exhortation: for I have written a letter unto you in few words. [brachus:G1024]


In Acts 27:28, it appears as a little further: And sounded [bolizo:G1001], and found [it] twenty fathoms [orguia:G3712] and when they had gone a little further,[brachus:G1024] they sounded [bolizo:G1001]  again, and found [it] fifteen fathoms. [orguia:G3712]  


We have already considered the next two terms, than the angels, which was discussed at some length in Hebrews 1, in which the superiority of the ministry of the Savior was compared to that of these angelic beings, whom God utilizes as the question that is posed in Hebrews 1:14 emphasizes:


Are they not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation?


So with that reminder, let’s proceed to the next phrase, thou crownedst him with glory and honour, which is made up of five terms that only surface together in this verse, so we will have to examine them individually:


Thou Crownest [stephanoo:G4737] Him [autos:G846]  With Glory [doxa:G1391] And [kai:G2532] Honor [time:G5092] 


Thou Crownest [stephanoo:G4737] 


The expression thou crownest is only found again in Hebrews 2:9 as well as in 2 Timothy 2:5 respectively:


Hebrews 2:9 affirms: But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned [stephanoo:G4737] with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


And 2 Timothy 2:5 acknowledges: And if a man also strive for masteries, [yet] is he [stephanoo:G4737][G0] not crowned, [stephanoo:G4737] except he strive lawfully.


Once again this word [yet] is he not crowned is separated by the word not, making it appear that it is used twice, even though that is not the case. If you are using an online interlinear you will notice a “G0” that appears after the “first” stephanoo to denote this. 


This Greek verb, crowned or stephanoo  is derived from its noun form, stephanos (G4735)  which is identical to the spelling of the first martyr, Stephen in Acts 7:59-60,


And they stoned Stephen [Stephanos:G4736], calling upon [God], and saying, Lord Jesus, receive my spirit. {60} And he kneeled down, and cried with a loud voice, Lord, lay not this sin to their charge. And when he had said this, he fell asleep.


Crown [stephanos:G4735]


Stephanos also carries a number of important connotations with regard to how God employs it as crown in the 18 citations in which it appears; the following examples illustrate how God incorporates this expression.


John 19:5 records: Then came Jesus forth, wearing the crown [stephanos:G4735] of thorns, and the purple robe. And [Pilate] saith unto them, Behold the man!


In similar fashion to 2 Timothy 2:5, 1 Corinthians 9:25 uses a familiar analogy of a sports competition (such as the forerunner of our modern Olympic games): And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they [do it] to obtain a corruptible crown;[stephanos:G4735] but we an incorruptible.


James 1:12 adds the spiritual definition to what this crown actually represents, which is eternal life: Blessed [is] the man that endureth temptation: for when he is tried, he shall receive the crown [stephanos:G4735] of life, which the Lord hath promised to them that love him.


However in Revelation 4:10 the imagery is that of the elect casting their crowns before the throne of the Lord Jesus Christ in grateful and humble adoration:  The four and twenty elders fall down before him that sat on the throne, and worship him that liveth for ever and ever, and cast their crowns [stephanos:G4735] before the throne, saying,


Finally Revelation 14:14 describes Christ as both King as well as Judge in our current day of judgment:  And I looked, and behold a white cloud, and upon the cloud [one] sat like unto the Son of man, having on his head a golden crown, [stephanos:G4735] and in his hand a sharp sickle.


With Glory [doxa:G1391] And [kai:G2532] Honor [time:G5092]


The last three words in the phrase, thou crownedst him with glory and honour is with glory and honor, which are found together in 15 Scriptures, and we will just mention four of them that contain these specific terms, glory or doxa (from which we get our English word, doxology) and honor, or time. Some of these passages such as Revelation 5:12 include these two words, glory  and honor plus five others in this glorious paean of praise and worship:


Saying with a loud voice, Worthy is the Lamb that was slain to receive power, and riches, and wisdom, and strength, and honour [doxa:G1391], and [kai:G2532] glory [time:G5092], and blessing.


Similarly, 1 Timothy 1:17 announces: Now unto the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only wise God, [be] honour [doxa:G1391]and [kai:G2532] glory [time:G5092] for ever and ever. Amen.


Once again Hebrews 2:9 includes these two characteristics:  But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory [time:G5092] and [kai:G2532] honour [doxa:G1391]; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man. (i.e., each of the elect)


2 Peter 1:17 likewise records this from his experience on the Mount of Transfiguration: For he received from God the Father honour [doxa:G1391] and [kai:G2532] glory [time:G5092], when there came such a voice to him from the excellent glory [time:G5092], This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.


Lastly, Revelation 21:24 and 26 depict the spiritual honor and glory that the elect possess by virtue of the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus at the foundation of the world, and with which they will forever embody to His eternal praise and thanksgiving in the New Heavens and the New Earth: 


And the nations of them which are saved shall walk in the light of it: and the kings of the earth do bring their glory [time:G5092] and [kai:G2532] honour [doxa:G1391] into it. ... {26} And they shall bring the glory [time:G5092] and [kai:G2532] honour [doxa:G1391] of the nations into it.


The next three expressions that we want to address are: 


And [kai:G2532] Didst Set [kathistemi:G2525] Him [autos:G846] 


These three words occur in eight other citations, and we will mention a few of them; keep in mind that the main word didst set or kathistemi is primarily translated as make or make ruler, which is most fitting for the KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS:


Matthew 24:45 queries:  Who then is a faithful and [kai:G2532] wise servant, whom his [autos:G846] lord hath made ruler [kathistemi:G2525] over his [autos:G846] household, to give them [autos:G846] meat in due season?


Acts 7:10, 27, and 35 teach: And [kai:G2532]  delivered him out of all his [autos:G846] afflictions, and [kai:G2532] gave him [autos:G846] favour and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh king of Egypt; and [kai:G2532] he made [kathistemi:G2525] him [autos:G846] governor over Egypt and all his [autos:G846] house. ... {27} But he that did his neighbour wrong thrust him [autos:G846] away, saying, Who made [kathistemi:G2525] thee a ruler and [kai:G2532] a judge over us? ... {35} This Moses whom they refused, saying, Who made [kathistemi:G2525] thee a ruler and [kai:G2532] a judge? the same did God send [to be] a ruler and [kai:G2532] a deliverer by the hand of the angel which appeared to him [autos:G846] in the bush.


The remaining four terms in Hebrews 2:7 are: over the works of thy hands, and they only appear together in this one verse, so we will take two at a time:


Over [epi:G1909] The Works [ergon:H2041]


The two expressions over or epi and the works or ergon are found in seven other references, as the subsequent verses highlight:


John 17:4 is the only citation in which these two terms are used together that refers specifically to Christ’s work; the other  Scriptures relate to the works that the elect perform, as God works through them ...to will and to do of His good pleasure (Philippians 2:13):  


I have glorified thee on [epi:G1909] the earth: I have finished the work [ergon:H2041] which thou gavest me to do.


Acts 26:20 reveals:  But shewed first unto them of Damascus, and at Jerusalem, and throughout all the coasts of Judaea, and [then] to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to [epi:G1909] God, and do works [ergon:H2041] meet for repentance.


Ephesians 2:10 parallels what Philippians 2:13 exhorts:  For we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto [epi:G1909]  good works [ergon:H2041], which God hath before ordained that we should walk in them.


Revelation 2:26 likewise affirms:  And he that overcometh, and keepeth my works [ergon:H2041] unto the end, to him will I give power over [epi:G1909] the nations:


Of [sou:G4675] Thy Hands [cheir:G5495] 


The final two words in Hebrews 2:7 are of or sou and thy hands or cheir. They crop up together in 19 references and we have already discussed these two terms when we were investigating Hebrews 1:10 which says:


And, Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid the foundation of the earth; and the heavens are the works of thine  [sou:G4675] hands: [cheir:G5495]


Now we can turn our attention to Psalm 8:5, which is being quoted in Hebrews 2:7,


For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.


For Thou Hast Made Him A Little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] Lower [chacer:H2637/TWOT:]


These two expressions, For thou hast made him a little or [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a]  and  lower or [chacer:H2637/TWOT:] are only found together is Psalm 8:5, so we will have to inspect them individually:

 

For Thou Hast Made Him A Little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] 


You might recall that the corresponding Greek wording, Thou hast made him a little included three words, whereas the Hebrew counterpart only one:  for thou hast made him a little, as the following verses illustrate:


1 Samuel 14:6 is a great example of the “few or little” principle that one encounters at times in the Bible, and reminds us of Philip’s estimation of the five loaves and two fishes which to him must have seemed almost negligible in light of the enormous need to feed 5000 men, plus women and children: 


And Jonathan said to the young man that bare his armour, Come, and let us go over unto the garrison of these uncircumcised: it may be that the LORD will work for us: for [there is] no restraint to the LORD to save by many or by few. [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a]  


Genesis 30:30 recounts Jacob’s words to Laban: For [it was] little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] which thou hadst before I [came], and it is [now] increased unto a multitude; and the LORD hath blessed thee since my coming: and now when shall I provide for mine own house also?


Genesis 47:9 reveals Jacob’s reply to Pharaoh question regarding his age, in which this word is rendered few: And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage [are] an hundred and thirty years: few [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a]  and evil have the days of the years of my life been, and have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage.


Deuteronomy 7:7 translates this as [were] the fewest: The LORD did not set his love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people; for ye [were] the fewest [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] of all people:


Judges 4:19 chronicles the death of Sisera (a type of Satan) by the woman Jael (who represents the elect), as he asked her for water, thinking she (and her husband Heber) were allies:  And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him.


Psalm 2:12 presents this grave warning:  Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish [from] the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a]  Blessed [are] all they that put their trust in him.


The following Scriptures are indicative of what is taking place today during our present day of judgment:


Isaiah 26:20 helps the child of God reflect on our present situation that can be reckoned as a light affliction (according to 2 Corinthians 4:17), when viewed from the perspective of the eternal future that awaits each of  God’s saints:  


Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee: hide thyself as it were for a little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] moment, until the indignation be overpast.


And Haggai 2:6 underscores what is transpiring spiritually today:  For thus saith the LORD of hosts; Yet once, it [is] a little while [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a],  and I will shake the heavens, and the earth, and the sea, and the dry [land];


Lord willing, in our next study we will continue researching Psalm 8:5. Please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.

Hebrews 2 - Part 13

 April 25, 2021


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 13, and today’s date is April 25, 2021. I’ll read Hebrews 2:1-9,


Therefore we ought to give the more earnest heed to the things which we have heard, lest at any time we should let [them] slip. {2} For if the word spoken by angels was stedfast, and every transgression and disobedience received a just recompence of reward; {3} How shall we escape, if we neglect so great salvation; which at the first began to be spoken by the Lord, and was confirmed unto us by them that heard [him]; {4} God also bearing [them] witness, both with signs and wonders, and with divers miracles, and gifts of the Holy Ghost, according to his own will? {5} For unto the angels hath he not put in subjection the world to come, whereof we speak. {6} But one in a certain place testified, saying, What is man, that thou art mindful of him? or the son of man, that thou visitest him? {7} Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


In Part 12 we had just begun to take a closer look at Psalm 8:5, which is being quoted in verse 7 and states:


For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour.


We discovered that Psalm 8:5 is referring to mankind, whereas in Hebrews 2:7 the Lord Jesus Christ is the One in view. With regard to the former, which seems like the greatest of understatements, one is immediately reminded of Psalm 8:4,

What is man, that thou art mindful of him? and the son of man, that thou visitest him?


However in thinking about the latter regarding the Lord Jesus Christ, what comes to mind is the holy affirmation found in Philippians 2:5-11,


Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: {6} Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God: {7} But made himself of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men: {8} And being found in fashion as a man, he humbled himself, and became obedient unto death, even the death of the cross. {9} Wherefore God also hath highly exalted him, and given him a name which is above every name: {10} That at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, of [things] in heaven, and [things] in earth, and [things] under the earth; {11} And [that] every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ [is] Lord, to the glory of God the Father.


In Part 12 we considered the phrase, For thou hast made him a little lower… but because it’s been three months since we have examined this chapter it might be helpful to review what we discovered about this first word again:


These two expressions, For thou hast made him a little or [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] and  lower or [chacer:H2637/TWOT:] are only found together is Psalm 8:5, so we will have to inspect them individually:

 

For Thou Hast Made Him A Little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] 


You might recall that the corresponding Greek wording in Hebrews 2:7, Thou hast made him a little consisted of three words, whereas the Hebrew counterpart only one:  for thou hast made him a little, as the following verses illustrate:


*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament


1 Samuel 14:6 is a great example of the Biblical principle “to save by many or by few” that is embedded in this verse; thou hast made him a little is expressed as by few: 


And Jonathan said to the young man that bare his armour, Come, and let us go over unto the garrison of these uncircumcised: it may be that the LORD will work for us: for [there is] no restraint to the LORD to save by many or by few. [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a]  


Genesis 30:30 recounts Jacob’s words to Laban, in which this term is rendered, [it was] little: For [it was] little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] which thou hadst before I [came], and it is [now] increased unto a multitude; and the LORD hath blessed thee since my coming: and now when shall I provide for mine own house also?


Verse 9 of Genesis 47:8-9 reveals Jacob’s reply to Pharaoh’s question regarding his age, in which this word is translated few: And Pharaoh said unto Jacob, How old [art] thou? {9} And Jacob said unto Pharaoh, The days of the years of my pilgrimage [are] an hundred and thirty years: few [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] and evil have the days of the years of my life been, and have not attained unto the days of the years of the life of my fathers in the days of their pilgrimage.


We want to bear in mind that the number 130 is made up of the factors 13 X 10. The number 13 is spiritually illustrative of “the time of the end,” as the 13,000th anniversary of earth’s creation took place in 1988, when the Great Tribulation of our day commenced, which coincides with the first Great Tribulation period of Jacob’s day as well as the 70-year Babylonian captivity. All three of these periods have in common the number 84. This breaks down this way: 7 years = 84 months (1st Great Tribulation); 70 years = 840 months (2nd Great Tribulation); 23 years = 8400 days (3rd Great Tribulation).


Here are some more examples of this word, For thou hast made him a little or m@`at:  


Deuteronomy 7:7 translates this as [were] the fewest: The LORD did not set his love upon you, nor choose you, because ye were more in number than any people; for ye [were] the fewest [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] of all people:


Judges 4:19 chronicles the death of Sisera (a type of Satan) by the woman Jael (who represents the elect), as he asked her for water, thinking she (and her husband Heber) were allies:  And he said unto her, Give me, I pray thee, a little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] water to drink; for I am thirsty. And she opened a bottle of milk, and gave him drink, and covered him.


Psalm 2:12 presents this grave warning:  Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish [from] the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a]  Blessed [are] all they that put their trust in him.


The following Scriptures are indicative of what is taking place today during our present day of judgment:


Isaiah 26:20 helps the child of God reflect on our present situation that can be reckoned as a light affliction (according to 2 Corinthians 4:17), when viewed from the perspective of the glorious eternal future that awaits each of God’s saints:  


Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee: hide thyself as it were for a little [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a] moment, until the indignation be overpast.


And Haggai 2:6 further underscores what the Almighty is doing spiritually today:  For thus saith the LORD of hosts; Yet once, it [is] a little while [m@`at:H4592TWOT:1228a],  and I will shake the heavens, and the earth, and the sea, and the dry [land]; 


Lower [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] 


This term, lower or chaser is the three-consonantal  shoresh or root of a number of words that convey the idea of lacking, whether in a positive sense, such as not lacking God’s blessings, provision, and wisdom as is the case with the elect; or by contrast, the non-elect who lack these spiritual blessings. This shoresh is made up of the letters Cheth/Samech/Resh, reading from left to right: the 8th, 15th, and 20th letters respectively of the Hebrew/Aramaic alphabet. The following Scriptures reveal some of the ways in which God employs this expression:


To begin with, verses 3 and 5 of Genesis 8:3-5 render these two words as abated and decreased with regard to the flood waters that began to recede: And the waters returned from off the earth continually: and after the end of the hundred and fifty days the waters were abated. [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] {4} And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat. {5} And the waters decreased [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] continually until the tenth month: in the tenth [month], on the first [day] of the month, were the tops of the mountains seen.


In Genesis 18:28 this term is expressed as there shall lack in this unique exchange that Abraham has with Jehovah:  Peradventure there shall lack [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] five of the fifty righteous: wilt thou destroy all the city for [lack of] five? And he said, If I find there forty and five, I will not destroy [it].


Deuteronomy 2:7 translates this as thee thou hast lacked: For the LORD thy God hath blessed thee in all the works of thy hand: he knoweth thy walking through this great wilderness: these forty years the LORD thy God [hath been] with thee; thou hast lacked [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] nothing.


1 Kings 17 is a historical parable and in verse 14 this term is rendered as fail: For thus saith the LORD God of Israel, The barrel of meal shall not waste, neither shall the cruse of oil fail [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705], until the day [that] the LORD sendeth rain upon the earth.


Nehemiah 9:21 reiterates God’s provision for the Israelites during their wilderness sojourn: Yea, forty years didst thou sustain them in the wilderness, [so that] they lacked [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] nothing; their clothes waxed not old, and their feet swelled not.


Psalm 23:1 translates this as want: [A Psalm of David.] The LORD [is] my shepherd; I shall not want. [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705]  


In similar fashion, Psalm 34:10 also acknowledges: The young lions do lack, and suffer hunger: but they that seek the LORD shall not want [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] any good [thing].


Lastly, Proverbs 13:25 pinpoints the compelling distinction that is so evident in our day between the righteous and the wicked, and once again renders this term as shall want:  The righteous eateth to the satisfying of his soul: but the belly of the wicked shall want. [chacer:H2637/TWOT:705] 


Than The Angels [’elohiym:H430/TWOT:93c]  


The next word that we want to investigate in Psalm 8:5 is than the angels, which is  not the usual word for angels or malak as one finds for instance, in verse 3 of Malachi 3:1-3, 


Behold, I will send my messenger [mal’ak:H4397/TWOT:1068a], and he shall prepare the way before me: and the Lord, whom ye seek, shall suddenly come to his temple, even the messenger [mal’ak:H4397/TWOT:1068a]  of the covenant, whom ye delight in: behold, he shall come, saith the LORD of hosts. {2} But who may abide the day of his coming? and who shall stand when he appeareth? for he [is] like a refiner's fire, and like fullers' soap: {3} And he shall sit [as] a refiner and purifier of silver: and he shall purify the sons of Levi, and purge them as gold and silver, that they may offer unto the LORD an offering in righteousness.


In this passage, malak is expressed twice as messenger, pointing altogether to the Lord Jesus Christ Who is indeed, the messenger of the covenant. Curiously the translators of the KJV rendered the Hebrew word, ’elohiym [’elohiym:H430/TWOT:93c] as  than the angels. ’Elohiym is the plural form for God, which is used over 2600 times in the Old Testament, as these next Scriptures testify:


We find this term in the very first verse in the Bible, in Genesis 1:1,

In the beginning [re’shiyth:H7225/TWOT:2097e] God [’elohiym:H430/TWOT:93c] created the heaven and the earth.


It’s extremely significant that the first word in this verse, in the beginning, is the Hebrew word for firstfruits or re’shiyth, (and in turn is related to the 20th letter of the Hebrew alphabet or Resh,  רֵ which means “head” or “chief”). The word, re’shiyth has the letter Bet (the second letter of the Hebrew alphabet) in front of it, serving as the preposition in the beginning.  We know that Christ became the first to rise from the dead at the foundation of the world as we read in verse 18 of Colossians 1:15-18, in which we find the Greek expressions for the following four epithets: 


  • The Beginning 
  • The Head Of The Body, The Church 
  • The Firstborn From The Dead
  • The Preeminence 


Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature: {16} For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether [they be] thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him: {17} And he is before all things, and by him all things consist. {18} And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all [things] he might have the preeminence


Psalm 25:5 acknowledges: Lead me in thy truth, and teach me: for thou [art] the God [’elohiym:H430/TWOT:93c] of my salvation; on thee do I wait all the day.


And Jonah 1:9 also reveals: And he said unto them, I [am] an Hebrew; and I fear the LORD, the God [’elohiym:H430/TWOT:93c] of heaven, which hath made the sea and the dry [land].


The last phrase in Psalm 8:5 is made up of three Hebrew words: ...and thou hast crowned him with glory and honour. However, these three terms only emerge together in this verse, so we will have to examine them individually.


And Thou Hast Crowned [`atar:H5449/TWOT:1608, 1608b] Him With Glory [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e] And Honour [hadar:H1926/TWOT:477b]


The term, and thou hast crowned, arises again in six other citations as the following citations indicate, and we can understand this to refer to Adam and Eve being crowned, before their fall into sin, after which they lost their initial lofty position of being king and queen of God’s creation, having surrendered it to Satan, when they sinned. God in His Divine Wisdom had already provided a solution to this sad incident by virtue of the the Work and Faith of the second man - The Messiah - as 1 Corinthians 15:45-49 clarifies: 


And so it is written, The first man Adam was made a living soul; the last Adam [was made] a quickening spirit. {46} Howbeit that [was] not first which is spiritual, but that which is natural; and afterward that which is spiritual. {47} The first man [is] of the earth, earthy: the second man [is] the Lord from heaven. {48} As [is] the earthy, such [are] they also that are earthy: and as [is] the heavenly, such [are] they also that are heavenly. {49} And as we have borne the image of the earthy, we shall also bear the image of the heavenly.


This comparison between Adam and Christ is also picked up in Romans 5:12-19; please note the interplay between “one” and “all” and “many,” which can be somewhat confusing because it alternates between the elect, mankind in general, the non-elect, Adam, and the Savior:


Wherefore, as by one man sin entered into the world, and death by sin; and so death passed upon all men, for that all have sinned: {13} (For until the law sin was in the world: but sin is not imputed when there is no law. {14} Nevertheless death reigned from Adam to Moses, even over them that had not sinned after the similitude of Adam's transgression, who is the figure of him that was to come. {15} But not as the offence, so also [is] the free gift. For if through the offence of one many be dead, much more the grace of God, and the gift by grace, [which is] by one man, Jesus Christ, hath abounded unto many. {16} And not as [it was] by one that sinned, [so is] the gift: for the judgment [was] by one to condemnation, but the free gift [is] of many offences unto justification. {17} For if by one man's offence death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ.) {18} Therefore as by the offence of one [judgment came] upon all men to condemnation; even so by the righteousness of one [the free gift came] upon all men unto justification of life. {19} For as by one man's disobedience many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one shall many be made righteous…


Unfortunately we were not able to continue the study as we had internet issues. We will pick up where we left off next Sunday, Lord willing.

Hebrews 2 - Part 14

May 2, 2021


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 14, and today’s date is May 2, 2021. I’ll read Hebrews 2:7-9,


Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


In our last study we lost our internet connection, so I would like to start today’s lesson by picking up where we left off, which was the expression, and thou hast crowned in Psalm 8:5, which is being quoted in Hebrews 2:7


For thou hast made him a little lower than the angels, and hast crowned him with glory and honour. 


And Thou Hast Crowned [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] 


The following examples illustrate some of the ways that God employs this term:


1 Samuel 23:26 records this word as compassed round about, as King Saul (who typifies God’s house that came under God’s judgment first, and David typifies the Lord Jesus Christ, as King Saul very literally persecuted him: And Saul went on this side of the mountain, and David and his men on that side of the mountain: and David made haste to get away for fear of Saul; for Saul and his men compassed [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] [H0] David and his men round about [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] to take them.


Psalm 5:12 is a beautiful affirmation of God’s care for His beloved saints: For thou, LORD, wilt bless the righteous; with favour wilt thou compass [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] him as [with] a shield.


Verse 11 of Psalm 65:9-13 translates this as Thou crownest: Thou crownest [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] the year with thy goodness; and thy paths drop fatness.


Verse 11 of Song of Solomon 3:6-11 appears to be pointing ultimately to Christ and His elect Bride: Who [is] this that cometh out of the wilderness like pillars of smoke, perfumed with myrrh and frankincense, with all powders of the merchant? {7} Behold his bed, which [is] Solomon's; threescore valiant men [are] about it, of the valiant of Israel. {8} They all hold swords, [being] expert in war: every man [hath] his sword upon his thigh because of fear in the night. {9} King Solomon made himself a chariot of the wood of Lebanon. {10} He made the pillars thereof [of] silver, the bottom thereof [of] gold, the covering of it [of] purple, the midst thereof being paved [with] love, for the daughters of Jerusalem. {11} Go forth, O ye daughters of Zion, and behold king Solomon [i.e., Christ] with the crown [`atarah:5850 - stems from H5849] wherewith his mother crowned [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] him in the day of his espousals, and in the day of the gladness of his heart.


Verse 8 of Isaiah 23:8-18 is another portrait of God’s judgment against His own house first: Who hath taken this counsel against Tyre, the crowning [`atar:H5849/TWOT:1608, 1608b] [city], whose merchants [are] princes, whose traffickers [are] the honourable of the earth? {9} The LORD of hosts hath purposed it, to stain the pride of all glory, [and] to bring into contempt all the honourable of the earth. {10} Pass through thy land as a river, O daughter of Tarshish: [there is] no more strength. {11} He stretched out his hand over the sea, he shook the kingdoms: the LORD hath given a commandment against the merchant [city], to destroy the strong holds thereof. {12} And he said, Thou shalt no more rejoice, O thou oppressed virgin, daughter of Zidon: arise, pass over to Chittim; there also shalt thou have no rest. {13} Behold the land of the Chaldeans; this people was not, [till] the Assyrian founded it for them that dwell in the wilderness: they set up the towers thereof, they raised up the palaces thereof; [and] he brought it to ruin. {14} Howl, ye ships of Tarshish: for your strength is laid waste. {15} And it shall come to pass in that day, that Tyre shall be forgotten seventy years, according to the days of one king: after the end of seventy years shall Tyre sing as an harlot. {16} Take an harp, go about the city, thou harlot that hast been forgotten; make sweet melody, sing many songs, that thou mayest be remembered. {17} And it shall come to pass after the end of seventy years, that the LORD will visit Tyre, and she shall turn to her hire, and shall commit fornication with all the kingdoms of the world upon the face of the earth. {18} And her merchandise and her hire shall be holiness to the LORD: it shall not be treasured nor laid up; for her merchandise shall be for them that dwell before the LORD, to eat sufficiently, and for durable clothing.


Him With Glory [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e] 


Now let’s turn our attention to the word, him with glory or kabowd which surfaces 200 times in the Old Testament as the following citations reveal:


Psalm 145:5, and 11-12  declare: I will speak of the glorious [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e] honour of thy majesty, and of thy wondrous works. ... {11} They shall speak of the glory [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e]  of thy kingdom, and talk of thy power; {12} To make known to the sons of men his mighty acts, and the glorious [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e]  majesty of his kingdom.


This is the same word that we find in two familiar notices:


Proverbs 25:2 maintains: [It is] the glory [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e]   of God to conceal a thing [dabar:H1697]: but the honour [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e] of kings [is] to search out a matter. [dabar:H1697]


And Psalm 19:1 extols: [To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David.] The heavens declare the glory [kabowd:H3519/TWOT:943d,e] of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork.


And Honour [hadar:H1926/TWOT:477b] 


The last word that we want to consider in Psalm 8:5 is and honour. This expression is also found in Psalm 145:5 and 12 that were just mentioned a few minutes ago and are translated as honour and majesty respectively:


I will speak of the glorious honour [hadar:H1926/TWOT:477b] of thy majesty, and of thy wondrous works. ... {12} To make known to the sons of men his mighty acts, and the glorious majesty [hadar:H1926/TWOT:477b] of his kingdom.


Verse 2 of Isaiah 35:1-10 includes this word expressed as excellency twice, in this chapter that appears to allude to our present day in which we are learning about the “delay in drawing” the great multitude and the transition into eternity:


The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose. {2} It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing: the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency [hadar:H1926/TWOT:477b] of Carmel and Sharon, they shall see the glory of the LORD, [and] the excellency [hadar:H1926/TWOT:477b] of our God. {3} Strengthen ye the weak hands, and confirm the feeble knees. {4} Say to them [that are] of a fearful heart, Be strong, fear not: behold, your God will come [with] vengeance, [even] God [with] a recompence; he will come and save you. {5} Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf shall be unstopped. {6} Then shall the lame [man] leap as an hart, and the tongue of the dumb sing: for in the wilderness shall waters break out, and streams in the desert. {7} And the parched ground shall become a pool, and the thirsty land springs of water: in the habitation of dragons, where each lay, [shall be] grass with reeds and rushes. {8} And an highway shall be there, and a way, and it shall be called The way of holiness; the unclean shall not pass over it; but it [shall be] for those: the wayfaring men, though fools, shall not err [therein]. {9} No lion shall be there, nor [any] ravenous beast shall go up thereon, it shall not be found there; but the redeemed shall walk [there]: {10} And the ransomed of the LORD shall return, and come to Zion with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads: they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.


The foregoing passages give us some idea of the perfection that mankind was fashioned in the image of God before the Fall; and as far as we know, this cannot be said of any other previous creation. However we are so far removed from that sublime state (after 13,000 + years of history) that we struggle to comprehend all that that pristine environment must have contained. Nonetheless, the child of God has been re-created in that perfect image in our souls in salvation, and shortly in our glorified spiritual bodies throughout eternity to serve God unceasingly.


Let’s now consider Hebrews 2:8, Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. 


Thou Hast Put [hupotasso:G5293] All Things [pas:G3956] In Subjection [hupotasso:G5293]


Verse 51 of Luke 2:40-51 records what took place during the Feast of Passover when the Lord Jesus was 12 years of age, which is the only notice between His birth and His baptism in 29 AD; these terms are rendered as subject unto and all:  


And the child grew, and waxed strong in spirit, filled with wisdom: and the grace of God was upon him. {41} Now his parents went to Jerusalem every year at the feast of the passover. {42} And when he was twelve years old, they went up to Jerusalem after the custom of the feast. {43} And when they had fulfilled the days, as they returned, the child Jesus tarried behind in Jerusalem; and Joseph and his mother knew not [of it]. {44} But they, supposing him to have been in the company, went a day's journey; and they sought him among [their] kinsfolk and acquaintance. {45} And when they found him not, they turned back again to Jerusalem, seeking him. {46} And it came to pass, that after three days they found him in the temple, sitting in the midst of the doctors, both hearing them, and asking them questions. {47} And all that heard him were astonished at his understanding and answers. {48} And when they saw him, they were amazed: and his mother said unto him, Son, why hast thou thus dealt with us? behold, thy father and I have sought thee sorrowing. {49} And he said unto them, How is it that ye sought me? wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business? {50} And they understood not the saying which he spake unto them. {51} And he went down with them, and came to Nazareth, and was subject unto [hupotasso:G5293]  them: but his mother kept all [pas:G3956] these sayings in her heart.


Romans 13:1 lays down this principle which the child of God is to observe, unless the law of the land goes against the higher law of the Bible: Let every [pas:G3956] soul be subject [hupotasso:G5293] unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.


Verses 27-26 of 1 Corinthians 15:20-28 provide a very unique commentary on Hebrews 2:8, in which these two terms are each repeated three times in each of these verses; we also witness the amazing dynamic between the Father and the Son within the Godhead: 


But now is Christ risen from the dead, [and] become the firstfruits of them that slept. {21} For since by man [came] death, by man [came] also the resurrection of the dead. {22} For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall all be made alive. {23} But every man in his own order: Christ the firstfruits; afterward they that are Christ's at his coming. {24} Then [cometh] the end, when he shall have delivered up the kingdom to God, even the Father; when he shall have put down all rule and all authority and power. {25} For he must reign, till he hath put all enemies under his feet. {26} The last enemy [that] shall be destroyed [is] death. {27} For he hath put [hupotasso:G5293] all things [pas:G3956] under [hupotasso:G5293] his feet. But when he saith all things [pas:G3956] are put under [hupotasso:G5293] [him, it is] manifest that he is excepted, which did put [hupotasso:G5293]  all things [pas:G3956] under [hupotasso:G5293] him. {28} And when all things [pas:G3956]  shall be subdued unto [hupotasso:G5293] him, then shall the Son also himself be subject [hupotasso:G5293] unto him that put [hupotasso:G5293] all things [pas:G3956]  under [hupotasso:G5293] him, that God may be all [pas:G3956] in all. [pas:G3956] 


Ephesians 1:22 also highlights the preeminence of the Savior: And hath put [hupotasso:G5293] all [pas:G3956][things] under his feet, and gave him [to be] the head over all [pas:G3956] [things] to the church,


This truth is also reiterated in Ephesians 5:24 in which the marriage relationship is a picture of the relationship between the Lord and His elect Bride: Therefore as the church is subject [hupotasso:G5293] unto Christ, so [let] the wives [be] to their own husbands in every thing. [pas:G3956] 


Philippians 3:21 reveals the glorious reality when God’s saints receive their glorified spiritual bodies on the day of resurrection: Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue [hupotasso:G5293] all things [pas:G3956] unto himself.


1 Peter 5:5 stresses the importance of humility in all relationships: Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all [pas:G3956]  [of you] be subject [hupotasso:G5293] one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.


Under [hupokato:G5270] His [autos:G846] Feet [pous:G4228]


The phrase, under his feet, consists of three Greek terms which are only found in two other passages, reminding us of the statement in Psalm 110:1-2, which took place at the foundation of the world: [A Psalm of David.] The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make thine enemies thy footstool. {2} The LORD shall send the rod of thy strength out of Zion: rule thou in the midst of thine enemies. (Incidentally for a detailed study of Psalm 110 please visit our website: www.bmius.org


Mark 6:11 declares: And whosoever shall not receive you, nor hear you, when ye depart thence, shake off the dust under [hupokato:G5270] your feet [pous:G4228] for a testimony against them. [autos:G846] Verily I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Sodom and Gomorrha in the day of judgment, than for that city.


Verse 1 of Revelation 12:1-5 is a spiritual portrayal of the Body of Christ that highlights our present day of judgment: And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under [hupokato:G5270] her [autos:G846] feet [pous:G4228], and upon her [autos:G846] head a crown of twelve stars: {2} And she being with child cried, travailing in birth, and pained to be delivered. {3} And there appeared another wonder in heaven; and behold a great red dragon, having seven heads and ten horns, and seven crowns upon his heads. {4} And his tail drew the third part of the stars of heaven, and did cast them to the earth: and the dragon stood before the woman which was ready to be delivered, for to devour her child as soon as it was born. {5} And she brought forth a man child, who was to rule [poimaino:G4165] all nations with a rod of iron: and her child was caught up unto God, and [to] his throne.


The term to rule or poimaino in verse 5 is identical to what we read in both Revelation 19:15 as well as in John 21:16  respectively, as this word can denote ruling the wicked who are under God’s wrath today, and by contrast, feeding God’s sheep and lambs which is the essence of the New Commission that God has ordained for His elect to fulfill in our current day of judgment: 


And out of his mouth goeth a sharp sword, that with it he should smite the nations: and he shall rule [poimaino:G4165]  them with a rod of iron: and he treadeth the winepress of the fierceness and wrath of Almighty God.


He saith to him again the second time, Simon, [son] of Jonas, lovest thou me? He saith unto him, Yea, Lord; thou knowest that I love thee. He saith unto him, Feed [poimaino:G4165] my sheep. 


He Left [aphiemi:G863] Nothing [oudeis:G3762]


It’s curious how God crafted the first part of verse 8 to say repeatedly that Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet (with the exception of the last enemy, death), especially in 1 Corinthians 15:27-28; by contrast, the latter part of the verse states, ...he left nothing [that is not] put under him… He first over-emphasizes the positive, and now mentions the negative, and shortly will discuss what still remains to be fulfilled. These two words, he left or aphiemi and nothing or oudeis appear together again in the following five references:


Mark 5:37 (and the parallel verse in Luke 8:51) states: And he suffered [aphiemi:G863] no man [oudeis:G3762]  to follow him, save Peter, and James, and John the brother of James.


Verse 12 of Mark 7:9-13 affirms: And he said unto them, Full well ye reject the commandment of God, that ye may keep your own tradition. {10} For Moses said, Honour thy father and thy mother; and, Whoso curseth father or mother, let him die the death: {11} But ye say, If a man shall say to his father or mother, [It is] Corban, that is to say, a gift, by whatsoever thou mightest be profited by me; [he shall be free]. {12} And ye suffer [aphiemi:G863]  him no more to do ought [oudeis:G3762]  for his father or his mother; {13} Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things do ye.


Verse 29 of Mark 10:28-31(and the parallel account in Luke 18:29)  proclaims: Then Peter began to say unto him, Lo, we have left all, and have followed thee. {29} And Jesus answered and said, Verily I say unto you, There is no man [oudeis:G3762] that hath left [aphiemi:G863] house, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my sake, and the gospel's, {30} But he shall receive an hundredfold now in this time, houses, and brethren, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and lands, with persecutions; and in the world to come eternal life. {31} But many [that are] first shall be last; and the last first.


But [de:G1161] Now [nun:G3568] We See [horao:G3768] 


The next phrase, but now we see, consists of three words which only surface again in verse 24 of John 15:12-25. This portion of Scripture includes, among other truths,  the definition of love, the difference between a servant and a friend, and how the world views both the Lord Jesus as well as His elect people: 


This is my commandment, That ye love one another, as I have loved you. {13} Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends. {14} Ye are my friends, if ye do whatsoever I command you. {15} Henceforth I call you not servants; for the servant knoweth not what his lord doeth: but I have called you friends; for all things that I have heard of my Father I have made known unto you. {16} Ye have not chosen me, but I have chosen you, and ordained you, that ye should go and bring forth fruit, and [that] your fruit should remain: that whatsoever ye shall ask of the Father in my name, he may give it you. {17} These things I command you, that ye love one another. {18} If the world hate you, ye know that it hated me before [it hated] you. {19} If ye were of the world, the world would love his own: but because ye are not of the world, but I have chosen you out of the world, therefore the world hateth you. {20} Remember the word that I said unto you, The servant is not greater than his lord. If they have persecuted me, they will also persecute you; if they have kept my saying, they will keep yours also. {21} But all these things will they do unto you for my name's sake, because they know not him that sent me. {22} If I had not come and spoken unto them, they had not had sin: but now they have no cloke for their sin. {23} He that hateth me hateth my Father also. {24} If I had not done among them the works which none other man did, they had not had sin: but [de:G1161] now [nun:G3568]  have they [horao:G3768] both seen [horao:G3768] and hated both me and my Father. {25} But [this cometh to pass], that the word might be fulfilled that is written in their law, They hated me without a cause.


There is still one remaining term for us to consider in Hebrews 2:8 which is the expression not yet in the last sentence: But now we see not yet all things put under him. 

  

Not Yet [oupo:G3768] 


This word emerges in 22 other references, and we will consider some of them:


Verse 4 of John 2:1-5 renders this word as not yet: And the third day there was a marriage in Cana of Galilee; and the mother of Jesus was there: {2} And both Jesus was called, and his disciples, to the marriage. {3} And when they wanted wine, the mother of Jesus saith unto him, They have no wine.{4} Jesus saith unto her, Woman, what have I to do with thee? mine hour is not yet [oupo:G3768] come. {5} His mother saith unto the servants, Whatsoever he saith unto you, do [it]. 


This term is expressed no less than five times in John 7:6, 8, 30, 39 which is a passage that spiritually points to our day and the spiritual Feast of Tabernacles, which is in actuality the Feast of the Bible, as Jesus replies to His family members:


Then Jesus said unto them, My time is not yet [oupo:G3768] come: but your time is alway ready. ... {8} Go ye up unto this feast: I go not [oupo:G3768][G0] up yet [G3768] unto this feast; for my time is not yet [oupo:G3768] full come. ... {30} Then they sought to take him: but no man laid hands on him, because his hour was not yet [oupo:G3768] come. ... {39} (But this spake he of the Spirit, which they that believe on him should receive: for the Holy Ghost was not yet [oupo:G3768] [given]; because that Jesus was not yet [oudepo:G3764]  glorified.)


Hebrews 12:4 also translates this word as not yet: Ye have not yet [oupo:G3768] resisted unto blood, striving against sin.


Verse 2 of 1 John 3:1-2 is a most encouraging Scripture for God’s people to meditate on during these difficult days: Behold, what manner of love the Father hath bestowed upon us, that we should be called the sons of God: therefore the world knoweth us not, because it knew him not. {2} Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet [oupo:G3768] appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.


Let’s stop here. Lord willing in our next study we will look at Psalm 8:6 which is being quoted in part in Hebrews 2:8. Please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.

Hebrews 2 - Part 15

 May 9, 2021


Good afternoon and welcome to BMI’s Sunday Online Fellowship. Thank you for 

joining us, and shall we ask God’s blessing upon our time together... This will be Hebrews 2 - Part 15, and today’s date is May 9, 2021. I’ll read Hebrews 2:7-9,


Thou madest him a little lower than the angels; thou crownedst him with glory and honour, and didst set him over the works of thy hands: {8} Thou hast put all things in subjection under his feet. For in that he put all in subjection under him, he left nothing [that is] not put under him. But now we see not yet all things put under him. {9} But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man.


As I mentioned at the close of our last study today we want to examine Psalm 8:6 which is being quoted in Hebrews 2:7-8 in part, and contains seven Hebrew words


Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all [things] under his feet:


Thou Madest Him To Have Dominion [mashal:H4910/TWOT*:1259]


This term is very important and used in a variety of different contexts. It was briefly mentioned in BMI’s Treasure of the Lamb video series, since is appears in Micah 5:2 as ruler:


But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, [though] thou be little among the thousands of Judah, [yet] out of thee shall he come forth unto me [that is] to be ruler [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] in Israel; whose goings forth [have been] from of old, from everlasting.



*Theological Wordbook of the Old Testament (TWOT)


Additionally we discovered this expression in Genesis 45:8 and 26 with regard to Joseph which does not come as a surprise, since he is such a magnificent spiritual portrait of God the Son: 


So now [it was] not you [that] sent me hither, but God: and he hath made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house, and a ruler [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] throughout all the land of Egypt. ... {26} And told him, saying, Joseph [is] yet alive, and he [is] governor [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over all the land of Egypt. And Jacob's heart fainted, for he believed them not.


Mashal also surfaces in verse 8 of  Genesis 37:5-11 with regard to Joseph's dreams, in which it is rendered as shalt thou indeed have dominion: And Joseph dreamed a dream, and he told [it] his brethren: and they hated him yet the more. {6} And he said unto them, Hear, I pray you, this dream which I have dreamed: {7} For, behold, we [were] binding sheaves in the field, and, lo, my sheaf arose, and also stood upright; and, behold, your sheaves stood round about, and made obeisance to my sheaf. {8} And his brethren said to him, Shalt thou indeed reign over us? or shalt thou indeed have dominion [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over us? And they hated him yet the more for his dreams, and for his words. {9} And he dreamed yet another dream, and told it his brethren, and said, Behold, I have dreamed a dream more; and, behold, the sun and the moon and the eleven stars made obeisance to me. {10} And he told [it] to his father, and to his brethren: and his father rebuked him, and said unto him, What [is] this dream that thou hast dreamed? Shall I and thy mother and thy brethren indeed come to bow down ourselves to thee to the earth? {11} And his brethren envied him; but his father observed the saying.


Verse 20 of Psalm 105:17-22 includes this expression as well:  He sent a man before them, [even] Joseph, [who] was sold for a servant: {18} Whose feet they hurt with fetters: he was laid in iron: {19} Until the time that his word came: the word of the LORD tried him. {20} The king sent and loosed him; [even] the ruler [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] of the people, and let him go free. {21} He made him lord of his house, and ruler[H4910] of all his substance: {22} To bind his princes at his pleasure; and teach his senators wisdom.



In verse 18 of  Genesis 1:16-18 God translates this term And to rule in conjunction with  His celestial timekeepers - the Sun (which spiritually refers to Christ) as well as  - the Moon (which represents the Bible or the Law of God): And God made two great lights; the greater light to rule the day, and the lesser light to rule the night: he made the stars also. {17} And God set them in the firmament of the heaven to give light upon the earth, {18} And to rule [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over the day and over the night, and to divide the light from the darkness: and God saw that [it was] good.


Psalm 22:28 describes God as He reigns over His everlasting spiritual Kingdom, as well as over the nations of the earth, in which this word is expressed as and he [is] the governor: For the kingdom [is] the LORD'S: and he [is] the governor [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] among the nations.


Psalm 103:19 also utilizes the word ruleth: The LORD hath prepared his throne in the heavens; and his kingdom ruleth [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over all. 


In verse 16 of Deuteronomy 15:5-6 God outlines part of His abundant blessings upon His people, provided that they obey Him:  


Only if thou carefully hearken unto the voice of the LORD thy God, to observe to do all these commandments which I command thee this day. {6} For the LORD thy God blesseth thee, as he promised thee: and thou shalt lend unto many nations, but thou shalt not borrow; and thou shalt reign [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over many nations, but they shall not reign [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over thee.


In Judges 8:22-23 Gideon highlights this significant Biblical truth, when the people of Israel wanted him to rule over them, by including this word four times (pointing to universality) in his response to them: 


Then the men of Israel said unto Gideon, Rule [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259]  thou over us, both thou, and thy son, and thy son's son also: for thou hast delivered us from the hand of Midian. {23} And Gideon said unto them, I will not rule [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over you, neither shall my son rule [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over you: the LORD shall rule [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over you.


In lieu of this we can see why Samuel (the last judge) was so troubled at Israel’s rebellious insistence in desiring an earthly king, just like all the other heathen nations as we read in 1 Samuel 8:4-7,


Then all the elders of Israel gathered themselves together, and came to Samuel unto Ramah, {5} And said unto him, Behold, thou art old, and thy sons walk not in thy ways: now make us a king to judge us like all the nations. {6} But the thing displeased Samuel, when they said, Give us a king to judge us. And Samuel prayed unto the LORD. {7} And the LORD said unto Samuel, Hearken unto the voice of the people in all that they say unto thee: for they have not rejected thee, but they have rejected me, that I should not reign over them. 


This adamant refusal to have the LORD as their prefect, righteous King and Master is also emphasized in the parable found in Luke 19:11-27,


And as they heard these things, he added and spake a parable, because he was nigh to Jerusalem, and because they thought that the kingdom of God should immediately appear. {12} He said therefore, A certain nobleman went into a far country to receive for himself a kingdom, and to return. {13} And he called his ten servants, and delivered them ten pounds, and said unto them, Occupy till I come. {14} But his citizens hated him, and sent a message after him, saying, We will not have this [man] to reign over us. {15} And it came to pass, that when he was returned, having received the kingdom, then he commanded these servants to be called unto him, to whom he had given the money, that he might know how much every man had gained by trading. {16} Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds. {17} And he said unto him, Well, thou good servant: because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities. {18} And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds. {19} And he said likewise to him, Be thou also over five cities. {20} And another came, saying, Lord, behold, [here is] thy pound, which I have kept laid up in a napkin: {21} For I feared thee, because thou art an austere man: thou takest up that thou layedst not down, and reapest that thou didst not sow. {22} And he saith unto him, Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, [thou] wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow: {23} Wherefore then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have required mine own with usury? {24} And he said unto them that stood by, Take from him the pound, and give [it] to him that hath ten pounds. {25} (And they said unto him, Lord, he hath ten pounds.) {26} For I say unto you, That unto every one which hath shall be given; and from him that hath not, even that he hath shall be taken away from him. {27} But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay [them] before me.


2 Samuel 23:3 also offers this exhortation:  The God of Israel said, the Rock of Israel spake to me, He that ruleth over [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] men [must be] just, ruling [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] in the fear of God.


This term surfaces in connection to Abraham’s eldest servant in verse 2 of Genesis 24:2-4, as he charges him with the responsibility of finding a wife for Isaac from among Abraham’s relatives: 


And Abraham said unto his eldest servant of his house, that ruled over [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] all that he had, Put, I pray thee, thy hand under my thigh: {3} And I will make thee swear by the LORD, the God of heaven, and the God of the earth, that thou shalt not take a wife unto my son of the daughters of the Canaanites, among whom I dwell: {4} But thou shalt go unto my country, and to my kindred, and take a wife unto my son Isaac.


These next two citations relate spiritually to the Lord Jesus in the first instance, and secondly to God’s elect, as God works in them ...to will and to do of his good pleasure (Philippians 2:13; Ephesians 2:10): 


Verse 13 of Psalm 19:12-14 petitions: Who can understand [his] errors? cleanse thou me from secret [faults]. {13} Keep back thy servant also from presumptuous [sins]; let them not have dominion [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] over me: then shall I be upright, and I shall be innocent from the great transgression. {14} Let the words of my mouth, and the meditation of my heart, be acceptable in thy sight, O LORD, my strength, and my redeemer.


Lastly, Proverbs 16:32 acknowledges: [He that is] slow to anger [is] better than the mighty; and he that ruleth [mashal:H4910/TWOT:1259] his spirit than he that taketh a city.


By the way this word mashal (H4910) מָשַׁל is comprised of the Hebrew letters (reading from right to left): Mem/Shin/Lamed.  There are also  five other identically spelled words that stem from this sheresh, which we will consider shortly. Keep in mind that sheresh typifies the Lord Jesus Christ, Who is the root out of dry gound” as we read in Isaiah 53:2,


For he shall grow up before him as a tender plant, and as a root [sheresh:H8328/TWOT:2471a] out of a dry ground: he hath no form nor comeliness; and when we shall see him, [there is] no beauty that we should desire him. 


Not only is Christ the Alpha and Omega as we read in the book of Revelation four times, but He is intimately related to every letter of the Hebrew/Aramaic and Greek alphabets that make up the 8,674 Hebrew words and the 5,624 Greek words found in the Word of God.  The five derivatives of mashal (H4910) are listed one right after the other in Jay P. Green’s Concise Lexicon of the Biblical Languages  in this order: H4911-H4915. Without spending too much time on this I will list one verse from each of these derivatives, keeping in mind that they are spelled identically to mashal (G4910), although they might reflect a different part of speech or different tense, and hence be pronounced differently:


מָשַׁל   


In Ezekiel 24:3 we have an example of both H4911 and H4912; the former, And utter is a verb and the latter, a parable, is a noun:


And utter [mashal:H4911] a parable [mashal:H4912] unto the rebellious house, and say unto them, Thus saith the Lord GOD; Set on a pot, set [it] on, and also pour water into it:


The thrust of the verb form is to liken or compare, or to speak a proverb or a parable. On the other hand, the noun form denotes a proverb, parable, or byword. מָשַׁל

H4913 is actually the proper name of a Levitical town of the tribe of Asher as we read in 1 Chronicles 6:74, 


And out of the tribe of Asher; Mashal [Mashal:H4913] with her suburbs, and Abdon with her suburbs,


                                                                     מָשַׁל     

H4914 is also found in one Scripture, and translated as the noun, me also a byword  in Job 17:6,


He hath made me also a byword [meshol:H4914] of the people; and aforetime I was as a tabret.


                                                               מָשַׁל   


H4915 appears in three references, and we will just look at one of them, in verse 10 of Zechariah 9:9-10, in which this noun is rendered and his dominion: 


Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he [is] just, and having salvation; lowly, and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass. 10 And I will cut off the chariot from Ephraim, and the horse from Jerusalem, and the battle bow shall be cut off: and he shall speak peace unto the heathen: and his dominion [moshel:H4915] [shall be] from sea [even] to sea, and from the river [even] to the ends of the earth.


Let’s get back to Psalm 8:6 which I will read again:


Thou madest him to have dominion over the works of thy hands; thou hast put all [things] under his feet:


Over The Works [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] Of Thy Hands [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


The next two expressions, over the works of thy hands - which has to do with the work of God’s hands - emerge together in 62 other verses, and we will look at a number of them:


A large percentage of these Scriptures are concerned with the works of the hands of men for salvation or the worship of false gods, both of which are an abomination to God, as Deuteronomy 31:29,


For I know that after my death ye will utterly corrupt [yourselves], and turn aside from the way which I have commanded you; and evil will befall you in the latter days; because ye will do evil in the sight of the LORD, to provoke him to anger through the work [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of your hands. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Deuteronomy 3:24 affirms: Lord GOD, thou hast begun to shew thy servant thy greatness, and thy mighty hand [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]: for what God [is there] in heaven or in earth, that can do according to thy works [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a], and according to thy might?


Isaiah 5 is a chapter that deals with God’s judgment beginning at His own house first and we read the following indictment in verse 12: 


And the harp, and the viol, the tabret, and pipe, and wine, are in their feasts: but they regard not the work of the LORD, neither consider the operation [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of his hands. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Without a doubt God’s greatest work is the work of redemption as Isaiah 60:21 acknowledges: Thy people also [shall be] all righteous: they shall inherit the land for ever, the branch of my planting, the work [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of my hands [yad:H3027/TWOT:844], that I may be glorified.


Isaiah 64:8 likewise asserts, But now, O LORD, thou [art] our father; we [are] the clay, and thou our potter; and we all [are] the work [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of thy hand. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Isaiah 64:8 relates to Romans 9:20-21 with respect to God’s election program (illustrated by the twin brothers Jacob and Esau before they were even born): 


Nay but, O man, who art thou that repliest against God? Shall the thing formed say to him that formed [it], Why hast thou made me thus? {21}  Hath not the potter power over the clay, of the same lump to make one vessel unto honour, and another unto dishonour?


One discovers this theme of the work of God’s hands in many of the Psalms as these next citations show:


Psalm 19:1 extols: [To the chief Musician, A Psalm of David.] The heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament sheweth his handywork. [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Psalm 92:4 adds: For thou, LORD, hast made me glad through thy work: I will triumph in the works [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of thy hands. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Psalm 102:25 speaks of both Creation as well as the atonement at the foundation of the world: Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens [are] the work [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of thy hands. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Psalms 111:7 exalts God’s greatest work pertaining to the sacrifice of the Lord Jesus, Who is indeed the Word of God: The works [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of his hands [yad:H3027/TWOT:844] [are] verity and judgment; all his commandments [are] sure.


Psalm 138:8 is a very comforting passage: The LORD will perfect [that which] concerneth me: thy mercy, O LORD, [endureth] for ever: forsake not the works [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of thine own hands. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


Psalm 138:3 also serves to remind us of the promise found in Philippians 1:6, 


Being confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun a good work in you will perform [it] until the day of Jesus Christ:


Psalm 143:5 is an encouragement to reflect upon all of God’s works as outlined throughout the Bible,  I remember the days of old; I meditate on all thy works; I muse on the work [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of thy hands. [yad:H3027/TWOT:844]


By comparison God’s saints are reminded to not forget the works of His hands as verse 2 of Psalm 103:1-5 reveals:


[A Psalm] of David.] Bless the LORD, O my soul: and all that is within me, [bless] his holy name. {2} Bless the LORD, O my soul, and forget not all his benefits: {3} Who forgiveth all thine iniquities; who healeth all thy diseases; {4} Who redeemeth thy life from destruction; who crowneth thee with lovingkindness and tender mercies; {5} Who satisfieth thy mouth with good [things; so that] thy youth is renewed like the eagle's.


Song of Solomon 7:1 pictures the spiritual re-creation of the elect as represented by the Bride of Christ: How beautiful are thy feet with shoes, O prince's daughter! the joints of thy thighs [are] like jewels, the work [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of the hands [yad:H3027/TWOT:844] of a cunning workman.


This analogy of beautiful feet was also used in connection with the sending forth the Gospel to reach the nations of the elect in Isaiah 52:7 which is quoted in Romans 10:15 respectively; please note the phrase, the feet of him in Isaiah as compared to the feet of them in Romans:   


How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him that bringeth good tidings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good tidings of good, that publisheth salvation; that saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth!


And how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things!


By contrast, God makes this assertion with regard to the unsaved in Psalm 28:5,  Because they regard not the works of the LORD, nor the operation [ma`aseh:H4639/TWOT:1708a] of his hands [yad:H3027/TWOT:844], he shall destroy them, and not build them up.


Thou Hast Put [shiyth:H7896/TWOT:2380] & His Feet [regel:H7272/TWOT:2113a]


The last two words that we want to examine in Psalm 8:6 are: thou hast put and his feet. These two expressions only surface together again in the subsequent two notices:


Verse 1 of Psalm 110:1-2 reveals that this event took place in the resurrection at the foundation of the world, once the atonement was fulfilled on behalf of all the elect, and today we see that Christ is ruling this world with a rod of iron (as Revelation 19:15 states), keeping in mind the principle that to sit is equivalent to ruling. Do you recall how Jesus sat on Jacob’s well in John 4 as He spoke with the Samaritan woman? That well represented the water of salvation, so by sitting on the well we understand that Christ is in charge of dispensing the water of salvation during that very, very long “day of salvation.”


[A Psalm of David.] The LORD said unto my Lord, Sit thou at my right hand, until I make [shiyth:H7896/TWOT:2380] thine enemies thy footstool. [regel:H7272/TWOT:2113a] {2} The LORD shall send the rod of thy strength out of Zion: rule thou in the midst of thine enemies.


Verse 16 of Jeremiah 13:15-16 and 19-25 also refer to God’s judgment on His own house first: Hear ye, and give ear; be not proud: for the LORD hath spoken. {16} Give glory to the LORD your God, before he cause darkness, and before your feet [regel:H7272/TWOT:2113a] stumble upon the dark mountains, and, while ye look for light, he turn it into the shadow of death, [and] make [shiyth:H7896/TWOT:2380] [it] gross darkness. ... {19} The cities of the south shall be shut up, and none shall open [them]: Judah shall be carried away captive all of it, it shall be wholly carried away captive. {20} Lift up your eyes, and behold them that come from the north: where [is] the flock [that] was given thee, thy beautiful flock? {21} What wilt thou say when he shall punish thee? for thou hast taught them [to be] captains, [and] as chief over thee: shall not sorrows take thee, as a woman in travail? {22} And if thou say in thine heart, Wherefore come these things upon me? For the greatness of thine iniquity are thy skirts discovered, [and] thy heels made bare. {23} Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? [then] may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil. {24} Therefore will I scatter them as the stubble that passeth away by the wind of the wilderness. {25} This [is] thy lot, the portion of thy measures from me, saith the LORD; because thou hast forgotten me, and trusted in falsehood.


Let’s stop here. Lord willing, in our next study we will focus on Hebrews 2:9, But we see Jesus, who was made a little lower than the angels for the suffering of death, crowned with glory and honour; that he by the grace of God should taste death for every man. Please stay tuned for the remainder of our Hymn Sing.